How do i find my family tree free


How to Find Your Ancestors for Free

How to Find Your Ancestors for Free

By Family Tree Editors

Table of Contents

Free Genealogy Websites

Ancestry.com Free Features

FamilySearch Features

FindMyPast Free Records

Free Genealogy Records

Free Genealogy Software


Totally Free Genealogy Websites

Finding your ancestors for free seems like an impossible task. Everywhere you turn, subscription-based access seems to be the only way to gain the family tree information you’re desperately seeking. But before you take out that second mortgage, take some time to do research on these totally free genealogy websites. We’ve included websites where you can build your family tree, search records, find genealogy books to borrow and reach out to volunteers who may help you with some of your genealogy research—all for free.

AccessGenealogy

This grab-bag of free genealogy records keeps growing.

Allen County Public Library

Though based in Indiana, this library’s online reach extends much further—reflecting its status as the nation’s second-richest genealogy library.

Ancestral Findings

This site offers free lookups of marriage, birth, death, immigration, land, military and census records in dozens of different resources.

Ancestry Library Edition

Your local library may offer you access to Ancestry.com’s immigration, census, vital and other records through Ancestry Library Edition. The library has to pay, of course, but it’s free to you as a patron.

Books We Own

The next best thing to owning essential genealogy resources is finding someone who has what you need and will do a free lookup for you.

Facebook

The world’s biggest social networking site is a useful tool for finding cousins and getting help with research from volunteers. There are countless pages dedicated to helping beginner genealogists, specific states and heritages, surnames, projects and much more.

FamilySearch

More than 2,000 online collections make this the internet’s largest home to free genealogy data.

Genealogy Bargains

This site points frugal genealogists to deals across the web—from free records access promotions and webinars to discounts on subscriptions and resources.

Genealogy Gophers

Smart, intuitive searching is the hallmark of the partnership with Family­Search here, which quickly combs 80,000 digitized books.

Google Books

Has someone already written a local or family history book relevant to your genealogy? Use Google Books to find out.

HathiTrust

To get the most out of this digital library, you must log in with credentials from a participating institution (such as a university). But there’s plenty here accessible to the general public, too.

HeritageQuest Online

Free to your home computer courtesy of your library card via participating institutions, HeritageQuest is now “powered by” (but not owned by) Ancestry.com.

Internet Archive

The long list of collections here ranges from 2.4 million library items to specialized collections for California and Portugal. Plus the Wayback Machine can find vanished genealogy sites from the early internet.

Library of Congress

Though not specifically focused on genealogy, the nation’s library has plenty to offer online. The Library’s genealogy collection began as early as 1815 with the purchase of Thomas Jefferson’s library.

Midwest Genealogy Center

This site from the Mid-Continent Public Library in Independence, Mo., taps one of the nation’s largest genealogy collections.

National Archives and Records Administration

Read all about the genealogical treasures stored at the National Archives, order military and other records, and browse historical maps and photos.

Olive Tree Genealogy

Since its launch in 1996, this modest website has grown into a useful collection of how-to help and databases.

Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness (RAOGK)

For research tasks in a distant library or archive, turn to this directory of volunteers and locations where they can do research tasks. (Please note you may be asked to reimburse small expenses such as photocopying or postage.)

RootsWeb

This venerable free site still serves up how-to articles, databases of surnames and US locations, mailing lists, pedigree files and much more—making it an oldie but a goodie.

USGenWeb

This volunteer site, with its state and county pages and special projects, remain as vibrant as ever.

WeRelate

Contributors here collaborate to build a single, unified family tree, with pages for more than 2.8 million people and 400,000 places. Register to add your tree; upload your family tree as a GEDCOM; and share documents, photos and stories.

WikiTree

More than half a million genealogists have contributed to this unified family tree, which now boasts nearly 18 million ancestral profiles (including living people, though they’re private except for invited people). Uniquely, more than 4 million profiles include information about DNA tests at various sites, which may help you confirm or reject your relation to that profile.

WorldCat/ArchiveGrid

Find your family history in 2 billion items at 10,000 of the world’s libraries, then click to see holdings nearest you using WorldCat. (You may also be able to borrow the books you discover using interlibrary loan.)

Its offshoot ArchiveGrid searches more than 4 million descriptions of archival records from 1,000 different institutions. Learn about historical documents, personal papers, family histories and other materials that may mention your ancestors. A clickable map makes it easy to find archives near you.

David Fryxell and Sunny Jane Morton

More Resources

NATIONAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

NGS Recommends…
18 Important Free Websites for Genealogy Research

GENEALOGY EXPLAINED

26 Free Genealogy Websites

AMY JOHNSON CROW

7 Free Genealogy Websites That You Might Be Overlooking

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Ways to Use Ancestry.com for Free

Even outside of a free trial, the savvy researcher can take advantage of Ancestry.com without having a paid subscription. Check out these seven free features of Ancestry.com (and its sister sites):

  1. Search the free index collections, which include both US and international records
  2. Use the free Ancestry.com card catalog
  3. View record previews
  4. Take a peek at public member trees
  5. Learn from Ancestry Academy’s how-to videos
  6. Watch Ancestry on YouTube
  7. Test with AncestryDNA (You’ll need to pay for a test, but you won’t need a paid Ancestry. com subscription to view your results or contact matches.)
  8. Search free records on Ancestry.com’s sister sites

Nancy Hendrickson

More Resources

FAMILY HISTORY DAILY

How to View Thousands of Free Records on Ancestry Without a Subscription

ANCESTOR SEARCH

Free Databases at Ancestry.com

ARE YOU MY COUSIN?

How To Do Free Genealogy Research on Ancestry.com

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Four Features of FamilySearch

FamilySearch.org is the world’s biggest, all-free, all-genealogy website, with the most global record content. Here are four features you should know about if you want to research your ancestors for free.

Historical Records

At last count, FamilySearch is home to more than 4 billion historical, high-quality genealogical document record images, painstakingly gathered over the course of several decades from repositories around the world.

FamilySearch Wiki

The FamilySearch Wiki hosts nearly 100,000 articles to get you started (or help you break through a brick wall) with your current research question.

Family History Library Catalog

The catalog of the entire Family History Library is searchable on FamilySearch.org. Search the catalog by place to explore what resources are available for your locale of interest.

FamilySearch Digital Library

In addition to the shelves of the Family History Library, the Digital Library offers search results on about half a million titles made available through libraries, genealogy societies and university libraries.

Sunny Jane Morton

More Resources

AMAZON

Unofficial Guide to FamilySearch.org: How to Find Your Family History on the World’s Largest Free Genealogy Website

FAMILY HISTORY HELP BY CAROL HILL

How to get HELP on FamilySearch.org

PORTSMOUTH PUBLIC LIBRARY

Guide to FamilySearch Resources

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Free Records on FindMyPast

Most of the giant genealogy websites, including Findmypast, allow users to create free guest logins and at least search their record collections for free. But viewing the actual record transcriptions and images you’ll find in search results generally requires the proper subscription. Findmypast’s free portal gives full access to the following to those who create their free registrations:

  1. 1940 United States Census and all Canadian censuses
  2. Parish registers, cemetery records and marriage indexes
  3. Passenger lists and travel records
  4. Irish Catholic parish records
  5. 1881 Census of England, Wales and Scotland

More Resources

THE GENEALOGY GUIDE

4 Ways You Can Get Records at FindMyPast For Free!

ARE YOU MY COUSIN?

Get the Most from A FindMyPast Free Trial

DUMMIES

How to Set Up a Findmypast.com Free Trial

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Free Genealogy Records

Here are some websites for tracking down more free genealogy records. Also keep in mind many public libraries, state archives, historical societies and universities host free digitized records on their own websites—so if you want to find your ancestors for free, you may have to do some extra digging.

It’s also possible to find free genealogy records at subscription genealogy sites, if you know where to look. Plus, be on the lookout for temporary, free full access to record collections on subscription sites, usually available around a specific holiday or anniversary of a historic event. You can easily find these at GenealogyBargains.com.

VITAL

The Ancestor Hunt

Archives.gov

FamilySearch Wiki

ResearchGuides.net

USGenWeb

VitalRec.com

CENSUS

Census Finder

Census Online

Internet Archive

My Free Census Records

ResearchGuides.net

CHURCH

The Ancestor Hunt

FamilySearch Wiki

FreeReg

Random Acts of Geneological Kindness
(links on left)

NEWSPAPERS

Chronicling America

Elephind

GenDisasters.com

Google News Archive

Online Historical Newspapers

Old Fulton New York Post Cards

ResearchGuides.net

DIRECTORIES

MyHeritage

Internet Archive

Google Books

Online Historical Directories

WorldCat

MILITARY

FamilySearch Wiki

ResearchGuides. net

USA.gov

More Resources

ARE YOU MY COUSIN?

Free Genealogy Records – A Guide To Frugal Genealogy Research

USA.GOV

Genealogy and Family History

ANCESTRY

Free Genealogy Records: Where to Find Them and How to Contribute

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Free Genealogy Software

If your research has ranged much beyond one family, you’re probably scouting for a way to organize your family tree. Genealogy database software could be just the ticket—and you don’t have to spend and arm and a leg to get enough power to accomplish the task. Several great options are just a free download away.

Ancestral Quest

Basics

This software has all the essential features for working with your family tree.

Gramps

Gramps is a free software and community project, created, developed and governed by genealogists. Features include family groups, charts, events, repositories list, and much more.

MyHeritage Family Tree Builder

Use this software to create your family tree offline or on a secure site at MyHeritage. com. You can print decorative family tree charts from your online tree (order larger copies for a fee). The program supports 36 languages and its SmartMatching technology searches for matches to your ancestors in other users’ trees.

Legacy Family Tree Standard Edition

This free version of the popular software includes family and pedigree views, a to-do list, research log, event reminders and more.

RootsMagic Essentials

You’ll get many of the core features of the award-winning RootsMagic software in this free version: the Source Wizard, loads of reports and charts, unlimited data capacity and more.

Lisa Louise Cooke

More Resources

CYNDI’S LIST

Free Genealogy Software

THE GENEALOGY GUIDE

6 Best Free Genealogy Software Downloads!

ARCHIVES.COM

Genealogy Software & Family Tree Research

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FamilyTreeMagazine.com is a participant in the Amazon Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program. It provides a means for this site to earn advertising fees, by advertising and linking to Amazon and affiliated websites.

General Genealogy

Author

Family Tree Editors

26 Totally Free Genealogy Websites to Search Your Family History

Free access to genealogy information is just a few clicks away – no membership required!  You might find anything from copies of your grandparents’ death certificates to a newspaper article about your great-grandfather’s business. Your free ancestry search starts here!

Pro tip: a great way to get your feet wet in this hobby is with a free trial at one of the big genealogy sites. MyHeritage has a free 14-day trial which gets you instant access to 16.9 billion records and over 3.5 billion family trees. Click here to learn more about this offer.

Check out these 26 totally free genealogy websites to help you explore your family history and grow your family tree.

Totally free genealogy websites

Trace your family tree for free online with these totally free genealogy websites:

  • MyHeritage – Search over 10 billion global historical records, birth, marriage and death records from 32 countries, 25 million pages of historical newspapers dating back to 1803, and more than 6.3 billion names – all with a 14-day free trial. Use it free for two weeks and cancel if it’s not for you. Read our complete MyHeritage Review.
  • Ancestry Free Trial – You can get access to all of Ancestry.com records for a 14-day free trial.
  • Family Search – The largest free genealogy website in the world.
  • National Archives – Federal military, census, immigration, land, naturalization records and more.
  • Library of Congress – Access free digitized images of newspapers, books, films, maps, personal narratives, photos, prints, and drawings.
  • Chronicling America – Part of the Library of Congress website, Chronicling America has searchable images of US newspapers from 1792-1963.
  • Allen County Public Library – Located in Fort Wayne, Indiana, the Allen County Public Library has one of the largest genealogy collections in the United States.
  • Ancestry Free Indexes – Want to do a free Ancestry search with no subscription? Ancestry.com has a number of free collections which include census records, immigration records, military records, prison records, wills, biographies, and a large number of Jewish records from eastern Europe. See our complete Ancestry.com review.
  • FindAGrave – Over 170 million burial and cemetery records have been submitted to Find-A-Grave.
  • Ellis Island – Through this website, you can explore the history of Ellis Island, get tips on genealogy research, and search the 65 million Ellis Island database entries for your immigrant ancestors.
  • Castle Garden – Records for 11 million immigrants to New York from 1820-1892 can be searched online.
  • USGenWeb – County and state resources, compiled and maintained by volunteers, the USGenWeb sites can provide historical information about places, local cemeteries, local birth, and death records, obituaries, and links to other genealogy resources related to the area and its people.
  • Fulton History – A searchable repository of old newspapers published in the United States and Canada, Fulton History has historical photos and newspapers from 1795 to 2007, with new data added weekly.
  • MyHeritage Family Tree Builder – This free software gets high ratings in its features, ease of use, and customer support.
  • David Rumsey’s Historical Maps – With over 90,000 maps and related images viewable online, this map collection can help you see where your ancestors lived and how boundaries and place names changed over time.
  • Sanborn Maps – A map collection within the Library of Congress, this collection of fire insurance maps published by the Sanborn Map Company can be used to see how cities evolved over time. See What are Sanborn Maps?
  • Google Maps – Google Maps can help you find places, look at the distance between places, and see topographical or satellite images of geographical areas.
  • Free BMD – If you have ancestors from England or Wales, Free BMD may help you find birth, marriage, or death records.
  • Google Books – Many out of print books have been scanned and can be read for free on the Google Books page.
  • Internet Archive – This is a good place to look for a family genealogy book or local history book.
  • Reclaim the Records – An activist group of historians, genealogists, researchers, and open government advocates, Reclaim the Records identifies information that should be in the public domain but has been restricted by the government, archive or library that holds it.
  • Jewish Gen – If your ancestors were Jewish, this website has more than 20 million records from all over the world to help you trace your Jewish heritage.
  • AfriGeneas – This site is dedicated to genealogy research for African Americans.
  • DeadFred – A free genealogy photo archive, Dead Fred lets you search for photos of your ancestors, and provides a forum to post photographs for other researchers to find.
  • Cyndi’s List – Cyndi’s list doesn’t have genealogy records. It tells you where to go to find records and other genealogy-related information on the internet.
  • DAR – The Daughter of the American Revolution website has a genealogy section with information on starting a family tree.

The best free genealogy websites reviewed

Ancestry Free Indexes

Not everything on Ancestry.com is behind a paywall.  Free genealogy records include census records, immigration records, military records, prison records, wills, biographies, and a large number of Jewish records from eastern Europe.  There’s a good representation of international records, as well as those from the United States. These free collections are a great way to get started in genealogy.

Ancestry Free Trial  

You can get access to all of Ancestry.com records for a 14-day free trial. This requires a credit card, and you have to cancel before the 14 days are up to avoid getting charged.  It’s a great way to try before you buy, and have access to Ancestry’s billions of genealogical records.

Family Search

An arm of the LDS Family History Library, this site has genealogy records from all over the world that you can search or browse, and the collection grows daily as more records are digitized.  You can print or save records, or add them as sources to your online tree that you build within their site.

Look for genealogies and family trees that others have added to the site, find books on your ancestors, and search the FHL holdings, and find a library near you where you can access more information.  

National Archives

The United States National Archives holds many genealogy records of genealogical importance.  Most of the records are not available online, but you can use their website to identify records you are interested in and educate yourself on the records that are available.  

When you identify a record of interest, you can view it by ordering a copy of the microfilm, accessing it at a regional National Archives research room.

Library of Congress

The Library of Congress website lets you access digitized images of newspapers (mostly from the 1800’s and 1900’s), books, films, maps, personal narratives (mostly from the Veterans History Project),  photos, prints and drawings from a variety of sources. Go to the library catalogs for archival finding aids and search engines to find out what is available.

Chronicling America

Were your ancestors in the news?  You may be able to find out on this site. Part of the Library of Congress website, Chronicling America has searchable images of US newspapers from 1792-1963.  

You can search for a newspaper and browse the available images or use the advanced search function and search by state or newspaper, keywords, and dates.

But what makes this one of my favorite free websites is the newspaper directory which shows you what papers were published where your ancestors lived, and where you can access their archives.

Allen County Public Library

Located in Fort Wayne, Indiana, the Allen County Public Library has one of the largest genealogy collections in the United States.  Their website has good information on starting your family history research. Online, you can access their free searchable database, links to digitized copies of books, and search their catalog for items you may be able to access at the library.

FindAGrave.com

One of my favorite free genealogy websites, Find A Grave has over 170 million burial records.  In addition to birth, death, and burial information, many submissions include names and vital information for spouses, parents, and children.  Some even include an obituary or biographical information.

Ellis Island

Passenger lists can be a great resource for your research – especially the ones from Ellis Island. Between the 1890s and the 1920s, many immigrants to the United States were processed through Ellis Island.  Through this website, you can explore the history of Ellis Island, get genealogy tips for your research, and search the 65 million Ellis Island database entries for your immigrant ancestors.  

Castle Garden

Before Ellis Island, Castle Garden was the main immigration processing center in New York.  Records and passenger lists for 11 million immigrants to New York from 1820-1892 can be searched online. The results may include information such as the ship they arrived on, the person’s age, birthplace, origin, destination, and who paid for their passage.  

USGenWeb

County and state resources, compiled and maintained by volunteers, the USGenWeb sites can provide historical information about places, local cemeteries, local birth, and death records, obituaries, and links to other genealogy resources related to the area and its people.

Fulton History

A searchable repository of old newspapers published in the United States and Canada, Fulton History has historical photos and newspapers from 1795 to 2007, with new data added weekly.  You can browse the folders of digitized documents or search for specific words and phrases on the search page.

MyHeritage Family Tree Builder Software

This free software gets high ratings in its features, ease of use, and customer support.  You can download and use the program for free. This software provides you a template for building a family tree and lets you sync the tree with your MyHeritage online tree.  

You can publish charts, view maps, and get hints using this software. Advanced features are available for purchase, but the basic software is useable without the upgrades. See our guide to genealogy software.

David Rumsey’s Historical Maps

Family history is linked to world history.  With over 90,000 maps and related images viewable online, this map collection can help you see where your ancestors lived and how boundaries and place names changed over time.  

Explore timeline maps, or look at aerial photos of places. This collection is searchable or can be browsed by what, where, who and when. The maps date from 1223 to current day.

Sanborn Maps

A map collection within the Library of Congress, this collection of fire insurance maps published by the Sanborn Map Company can be used to see how cities evolved over time.  

There are over 25,000 sheets from more than 3,000 cities in the USA. The maps show types of construction for buildings in the city, whether buildings are residential or commercial, as well as listing the main buildings within the city and their use.

Google Maps

For current day geographical research, Google Maps can help you find places, look at the distance between places, and see topographical or satellite images of geographical areas.  

When you’re traveling to do genealogy research, you can use its navigation functions to find businesses, cemeteries, historical museums, and libraries in the area. Sign in with your Google account and you can make personal maps with dropped pins for areas of interest.

Free BMD

If you have ancestors from England or Wales, Free BMD may help you find birth, marriage, or death records.  Its goal is to transcribe and the Civil Registration Indexes from 1837-1992. The project is ongoing, and not all records have been transcribed, but there are more than 270 million records currently available online.  

The indexes can be searched, and the original index can be viewed, when available. Indexes give volume and page of the actual record held by the Registry office. The site has links to help you order a certificate. Once you pinpoint a date and place using this site, you can then go search the parish registers for church records on sites like FindmyPast, Ancestry, and FamilySearch.

Google Books

Books are a great source of information in genealogy research, especially if your family was a pioneer or early settler of an area.  Many genealogies, family or area history books, and biographies will give sketches of ancestors and more information than you might find in a birth or death certificate.  

It’s also very important to understand the local histories for the places your ancestors lived. Many out of print books have been scanned and can be read for free on the Google Books page.  For more recent books, you can find links to booksellers or to locate a library near you that may have the book.

Internet Archive

A non-profit online library, Internet Archive contains books that can be read for free or borrowed online for up to two weeks.  This is a good place to look for a family genealogy book or local history book. Even school yearbooks and government documents can be found on this site.  

Reclaim the Records

An activist group of historians, genealogists, researchers, and open government advocates, Reclaim the Records identifies information that should be in the public domain but has been restricted by the government, archive or library that holds it.  

They file a freedom of information (FOI) requests for documents and take the matter to court if the records are not released. All the records they gain access to are digitized and placed online and are available at no cost. Links on their page take you to the records that can be viewed and downloaded.

Jewish Gen

If your ancestors were Jewish, this website has more than 20 million records from all over the world to help you trace your Jewish heritage.  In addition to a beginner’s page that provides information on how to get started, there is an online genealogy course, discussion groups, and family finder registration to allow communication between people who are searching for the same family.  

Their searchable databases include Jewish family trees, community data, burial registries, holocaust data, and country-specific information such as birth, marriage, death, military, and census records.

AfriGeneas

This site is dedicated to genealogy research for African Americans.  There is an online interactive guide for beginners, searchable online records, forums, chats, and links to additional resources.  

A unique approach this site takes is collecting slave data from descendants of slaveholders to help break through the lack of public records for African Americans prior to the Civil War.

DeadFred

Seeing the faces of your ancestors gives genealogy research a little extra excitement.  A free genealogy photo archive, Dead Fred lets you search for photos of your ancestors, and provides a forum to post photographs for other researchers to find.  

If the original photo is owned by the Dead Fred archive, and you can show you are a direct descendant, they will send you the original for free, all you pay is postage.

Cyndi’s List

Cyndi’s list doesn’t have records.  It tells you where to go to find records and other genealogy-related information on the internet – many of which are free websites. Categorized and cross-referenced, this comprehensive database is a great starting point when doing research.  

You can search for links by location (such as Minnesota birth records) or search by topic (such as Organizing your Research).  

DAR

The Daughter of the American Revolution website has a genealogy section with information on starting a family tree.  There is also a Genealogical Research System (GRS) to search ancestors, members, or descendants. The results will give you basic information found in the records, and a link to purchase associated records.  

FAQ

What is the best free genealogy website?

The best genealogy website will depend on what you’re researching in terms of time and place. The biggest free site by far though is FamilySearch.org.

Is FamilySearch a free site?

Yes, FamilySearch is completely free to use and tops my list of free genealogy websites. It is owned by the Church of Jesus Christ and Latter-Day Saints. Note that some record collections have special licensing terms that require you to view the collection at a local Family History Center or affiliate library.

Can you view census records for free?

Yes, U.S. census records can be viewed for free on FamilySearch.org.

Are there any free genealogy websites like Ancestry?

The only free website like Ancestry for research and record access is FamilySearch.

What is the most accurate genealogy website?

The most accurate genealogy website depends on what you’re looking for. No one website is the best for every situation. It is important to use multiple sources to get the most accurate information possible.

Keep learning

  • Ancestry vs FamilySearch vs MyHeritage vs FindMyPast

Find your ancestors in Family Tree

Are you trying to find an ancestor or deceased family member? If so, we encourage you to search our Family Tree, the largest single family tree in the world. It contains over a billion names. The tree is free and public, and the ancestor you're looking for may already be in it.

Gather everything you know about your deceased relative - their full name, birth or death information, if possible the names of parents, spouses or children - and follow these steps to find out if they are listed on Family Tree. Or click on the button below and go directly to our "Search" page.

Family Tree Search is a quick way to start building or adding more information to your family tree

If you want to find a relative who might be in the Family Tree, go to the FamilySearch website and then in the Family Tree tab select Find . Get ready to sign in or create a free FamilySearch account. (You can also access this page via the tab Search and select Family tree .)

On the Find page, enter what you know about your deceased relative. The system will open a page with a simplified search bar that works for the initial search. However, for best results, we recommend that you open the advanced search function by clicking More Options .

Tree Search looks and functions much like the FamilySearch Historical Record Search tool. We did it on purpose, of course. Any search strategies you have learned for this page will be equally useful here. Let's go through each filter individually and see how they work.

1. Names

Let's consider some recommendations for filling in the fields for full name.

  • Enter the person's last name in the Last Name field.
  • Use the Name Variation tab to list maiden names, nicknames, aliases, other spellings of the first name, middle surnames, and any name changes that may have occurred during the person's lifetime.
  • 2nd floor

    Entering the gender of a person Male or Female if known, will narrow your search results.

    3. Events from life

    In the line "Add event from life" enter the information you know about where this person was during his life. Be sure to change the filter from Any to Birth , Marriage , Residence or Death . This will probably make your search more accurate.

    4. Family members

    In section Add family members , enter what you know about the person's spouse, father, mother, or other relationship. You can use the same guidelines and strategies for entering names here as before.

    5. Exact Search

    Directly below the Family Members section is the radio button Show exact search . Be careful using this option. Use it only when the system produces search results in such a volume that you cannot analyze. The actual data in Family Tree may differ slightly from the names, dates, and places you enter, so it's best to be flexible with your search criteria.

    It is important to note that by enabling the checkbox Show exact search , it is not necessary to immediately search for exact criteria. The system opens fields opposite all search filters on the screen, which you can select or leave blank. It is strongly recommended that you fill in only those fields for which you absolutely need to search by exact criteria. Start your search using a small number of these fields. In other words, you can search for exact criteria for a specific date of birth without using other fields.

    After entering the information you know, press Search to search for your ancestor's profile in Family Tree. When the system returns the search results, click on the name to see a summary of that person's information. Then click on the name in the dropdown box to go to the person's page.

    Helpful Hints for Finding the Right Person

    Too Many Results

    Use the gray button filters at the top of the page to quickly narrow your search results:

    In the search, as shown in these screenshots, I first enter my great-grandfather's name. As you can see, this broad search brought up a lot of results - too many to explore. If I click on the filter Birth and select a specific region of the world, I can immediately decrease that number.

    No results or matches

    If your initial search was unsuccessful, use the search bar on the right side of the screen to change your criteria. Note: Depending on your screen size, the search bar may be initially hidden. If so, press Search in the right corner to open it.

    To broaden your search, you can change things that might be too specific, such as the exact year. Increasing the date range for a particular event can be an effective way. You can also try selecting Birth or Place of residence instead of Any in the Life Event section. If applicable, use the "Name Option" line to enter your maiden name, alias, or other spelling of the first name. Then press Search .

    If you still can't find the person you want after editing your search, that person may not have been added to Family Tree. In this case, you can add this person yourself.

    To add a person to the Tree, you will need their name, and then you can enter as much additional information about them as possible, such as where the person was born or where they lived.

    Hint: If you are missing information about your ancestor, try to find it in the historical record, for example, in a birth certificate, marriage certificate, military card or death certificate.

    Using the "Settings" option to customize your search results

    Experienced researchers will certainly appreciate the functionality of the "Settings" section that appears at the top of the search results page. In Preferences, you can make important decisions about formatting and exporting search results.

    For example, the first option in the "Settings" section is to choose whether to display search results as a page of data or as a fixed table: data page. The format makes it easy to scroll through and find matching results.

    In contrast, with a fixed table, we can analyze a small subset of the search results that we think are promising and see how they match what we knew about the person.

    Next in the Preferences panel is the Language Options section. Here you can choose to view the information as it was originally entered into FamilySearch, or view it with minor edits, which we call "translations," to make it easier to read. A simple example would be "January 1855" which, if refined or translated, would be "January 1855".

    Last but not least in the Preferences panel is the option to download search results to your computer. Perhaps you have your own methods of accounting and filtering information. If yes, then you can download the information in any of the following file formats: XLS, XLSX, CSV, ODS, TSV and ODS.

    Find your ancestors in FamilySearch Family Tree!


    Ready to learn something new about your ancestors? There is room for everyone in our Family Tree. We want everyone to help in its creation!

    Select a deceased ancestor and see if their name is among the 1.2 billion names in the FamilySearch Family Tree! Find a person's profile and enjoy stories, photos, timelines and more about them. Then think about what you know about this person and what you can add to their profile. Perhaps one of the relatives will thank you in the future!

    order the pedigree

    • DEMILICAL STUDITION
      of your genus until 1750

      Study of the history of your family, Search for ancestors, description of their lifestyle

      9000 more Learn more than Search for documents
      in state archives

      Compilation of archive requests, obtaining archival certificates and copies of documents

      Reasons to conduct research

      You will learn the history of your ancestors

      Genealogical research includes generational painting, description of the historical situation of the life of ancestors and historical and geographical research

      You will emphasize the status

      Deep knowledge of one's roots used to be a property of aristocrats and intellectuals. This value has been preserved to this day.

      You will strengthen the family

      Studying your pedigree will surely create new bonds among family members. Family history should be passed on to children!

      Before/After contacting us

      Often people who begin to restore the history of the family do not even remember their great-grandfather
      . Using archival material, we help restore
      their family tree, on average, 12 generations deep. The result is there!

      Archival search

      Using archival documents, you can restore your genealogy, confirm it with documents and find interesting facts about your ancestors

      Historical and cultural research

      When the genealogy is restored, we conduct a study on the specific territory and locality and life circumstances of your family

      Writing a report

      A report on genealogical research has a volume of approximately 40-60 pages. The history of your family is divided into chapters and stages, described in detail by our specialists and illustrated with documents, works of art, tables and diagrams. Also, the customer receives his family tree and a family diploma about his last name.

      Presentation to the customer

      At the request of the customer, the results of the study are presented to family members. From experience we can say that it turns into a common family holiday!

      You should contact us if:

      You don't know anything about
      the history of your family

      It happens that it is difficult to take even the first step, or due to workload there is not enough time to restore the history of the family. Then it can be entrusted to professionals!

      You collected the amount of information yourself, but you want more

      Sometimes it happens that a person has collected documents, interviewed relatives and restored the pedigree to a certain depth, and got into a dead end because he does not know how to go further, and how to contact the archives. We will help!

      You know about one lineage of your family and want to complete it

      It happens that a lot is known about one of the parents, but nothing about the other. It makes sense for the family to restore the balance!

      Pages of our reports

      In the report to the customer, we include everything that we could find about his family: archival documents, information about the awards of ancestors, historical and cultural research of the territory of residence, information about how the history of the country influenced the history of the family, and much more !

      Download an example of a real report to the customer!

      Work algorithm

      Primary data

      The customer provides us with the available information about the history of his family. Also at this stage, if possible, interviews are conducted with older family members in order to determine the direction of the search. The result of the work at the first stage is the definition of a range of archives and a documentary complex for further search. Duration: approx. 2 months.

      Archival search

      We work with state and departmental archival institutions, obtain certificates and copies of documents, systematize and arrange. First, the pedigree is restored to the maximum depth, then work is carried out to expand and specify the history of the genus. Duration: approx. 4-6 months.

      Preparing and submitting a report

      We collect a report on the research done, model and arrange a family tree, provide documents in the form of paper copies and in the form of an electronic database. Based on the results of the study, a presentation is made to the customer.

      Ordering a genealogical research from us,
      you will get the following results:

      KNOWLEDGE

      The history of your family has been restored to the 18th century, systematized, supported by documents and described by professional historians.

      STATUS

      Knowing the history of one's family is the prerogative of the upper class.
      You will get it!

      CONTINUITY

      Knowing your own history will allow you to gather a family around a common cause and restore the connection between generations.

      Popular questions about our services:

      The country's archives contain documented data on birth, marriage, military service and awards, and other personal data.
      Searching the archives will help you find documents that tell about the history of your ancestors. Copies of certificates will be in the personal archive.

      Yes, most likely. Almost every person has information in state archives, as they contain a variety of documents that record ordinary events of human life - certificates from notaries, records of education, information about buying and selling real estate, and so on. And all these once completely uninteresting papers can become a real treasure for a researcher. Sometimes just the name of a great-great-great-grandfather unknown to you before can be considered a valuable find!

      To restore the pedigree: standard genealogical sources: registers of births, confession lists, revision tales.
      To expand history: act material, minutes of party meetings, court cases, personal files of party workers, archives of large enterprises, documents from museum funds, etc. (8-10 knees).
      At the same time, genealogists conduct a historical and geographical study of the places of residence of your ancestors and reconstruct everyday life at one time or another.


      Learn more