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Plumeria, Frangipani For Sale at Florida Colors Nursery

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    P. Isabella Plumeria

    Florida Colors Introductions Collection

    MSRP: $55. 00

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    P. Isabella Mysterious plant originating in Colombia South America. Like all Plumeria species from the wild, the flowers are white with a small yellow center. Slight frangipani fragrance. Large...

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    Vivace Plumeria

    Florida Colors Originals Collection

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    Vivace: A beautiful 4" cherry red flower good bloomer. Stunning cherry red flowers cover this tree in early spring. Medium growing tree well branched tree. faint fragrance. Blooms early over long...

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    Redlands Sunset FCN Plumeria

    Florida Colors Originals Collection

    Now: Now: $60. 00 - $75.00

    Redland's Sunset: This medium grower with beautiful Orange multi colored 3" flowers. Collectors who enjoy having a rare addition to their collection. Florida Colors Plumeria Nursery seedling...

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    Stormy FCN Plumeria

    Florida Colors Originals Collection

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    Stormy: 2022 introduction This striking beauty offers gorgeous muliti color 3” blooms with darker red center and heavy striations. The inflo creates a striking bloom bouquet that pop against the...

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    Excalibur Plumeria Fertilizer IX - NPK 11-11-13 Includes Shipping

    Excalibur Plumeria Fertilizer© by Florida Colors Nursery

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    Excalibur Plumeria Fertilizer IX (NPK 11-11-13) 9 month slow release (Includes Shipping) NOW WITH BORON. Excalibur Plumeria Fertilizer was developed by combining Florida Colors Nursery’s expertise...

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    Excalibur Plumeria Fertilizer VI - NPK 11-11-14 Includes Shipping

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    Excalibur Plumeria Fertilizer VI (NPK of 11-11-14) Includes Shipping NOW WITH BORON. Excalibur Plumeria Fertilizer was developed by combining Florida Colors Nursery’s expertise growing plumeria with...

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    Excalibur BOOST Plumeria Fertilizer NPK 10-12-14 Includes Shipping

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    Excalibur BOOST Plumeria Fertilizer (10-12-14 with micronutrients)Free shipping! Florida Colors Nursery is following up the successful launch of Excalibur Plumeria Fertilizer© formulated...

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    Musk Rainbow aka George Brown Plumeria

    Australia Collection

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    George Brown aka Musk Rainbow, Dwarf George Brown. Very rich crimson, purplish red. Unique among the fruit salad /tri-color types. Excellent, most intoxicating fragrance - strawberries, raspberries...

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    Vivace Plumeria

    Florida Colors Originals Collection

    Now: Now: $52. 00 - $65.00

    Vivace: A beautiful 4" cherry red flower good bloomer. Stunning cherry red flowers cover this tree in early spring. Medium growing tree well branched tree. faint fragrance. Blooms early over long...

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    Spellbound JJ Plumeria

    Jungle Jack Collection

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    Jungle Jack's Spellbound:We really love violet hues, and this gorgeous 3" mauve beauty develops cupped tips with streaky purple edges in the heat. Standard growth habit. Lovely, strong floral...

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    Thornton Raspberry Plumeria

    United States Collection

    Now: Now: $30. 00

    Thornton Raspberry 3 1/2" Bright pink with white. Superior growth habit. Unusual strong sweet - Cool Aid fragrance. Elliptical slightly overlapped rounded petals and a dark orange center. Dark pink...

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    Redlands Sunset FCN Plumeria

    Florida Colors Originals Collection

    Now: Now: $60.00 - $75.00

    Redland's Sunset: This medium grower with beautiful Orange multi colored 3" flowers. Collectors who enjoy having a rare addition to their collection. Florida Colors Plumeria Nursery seedling...

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    Florida Colors Introductions Collection

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Plumeria for Sale - Buying & Growing Guide

Planting instructions

by John Haryasz | Horticulture Writer and Landscape Designer – last update on January 17, 2022

Choose a planting site that receives at least six to eight hours of full sun, any less, and your plumeria will not thrive or bloom. The spot you pick should provide protection from heavy winds or freezing temperatures. As with many tropical plants, plumerias prefer moist, well-draining soil. They will do best with slightly acidic soil with a pH range of 5.5 to 6. Test your soil to determine if you will need to amend it. Dig a hole that is two times the width and height of the plant’s root ball. Amend the soil you have removed from the hole for pH, drainage, and nutrients. Adding a cactus potting mix, some grit, and rich compost to your garden soil will help get your plant off to a good start. Using some of your newly mixed soil, make a small hill in the bottom of the hole. Loosen the soil around the roots of the plumeria plant and place them over the small hill. Backfill the hole while keeping the roots loose to spread out as they grow, then water deeply. In warm climates with cold winters, you can dig up your plumeria and overwinter it indoors. You can also choose to grow this plant in a container year-round, which makes it easier to move inside when the outdoor temperatures get too cold.

Watering and nutrients

Plumerias will need frequent watering until they are firmly established. It usually takes about two months for the roots to spread out. After that, they become reasonably tolerant to most drought conditions. Weekly watering is generally sufficient. Plumeria plants love water, but they do need to be allowed to dry out between waterings. A good indicator of your plant needing water is if the top few inches of soil are dry to the touch. They are pretty forgiving when it comes to surviving extended drought periods. It is better to err on the dry side as plumeria plants will not tolerate soggy roots. Periodic feedings are beneficial for your plumeria plants, whether in the ground or in containers. A consistent feeding schedule will help plants remain vigorous and blooming. Quit feeding before the plant enters the dormant stage in the fall. Resume the fertilizations again in the spring.

Pollination

Plumerias are self-pollinating, with both male and female flowers on the same plant. Having multiple plants or other pollinators is not necessary. Plumerias have very few natural pollinators. Deep-throated blooms make it difficult for most pollinators to extract pollen or nectar. Sphinx moths, thrips, and tiny ants are a few that do have that ability.

Pruning

You may choose to prune your plumeria to encourage branching. This type of pruning encourages the plant to take on a fuller, more bush-like form. Pruning can also aid in the removal of dead or diseased branches. The best time for any pruning is before new growth begins in the spring or while the plant is dormant in winter. Pruning during any other time can interfere with your plant’s blooming and growth.

Pests and diseases

There are several pests that commonly afflict plumeria plants. Most of the problems with insects occur when the plant’s growing conditions are not ideal. Dry soil or shaded locations invite attacks from mealybugs, scales, spider mites, and whiteflies. A fungus known as “rust” can appear on the leaves in the fall, but it is rarely harmful. It is usually a result of too much moisture and not enough air circulation.

Do plumerias plants go dormant?

Plumerias go dormant during winter or when temperatures dip below 50 degrees Fahrenheit. When that happens, plumerias drop their leaves and need little to no sunlight or water. They can be stored in a dark area such as a closet, garage, or greenhouse. The plants can either be stored in their containers or as bare-root plants.

Can plumerias grow in containers?

Whether your plumeria is a potted plant or a dedicated houseplant, the needs are similar. As with in-ground plantings, your container-grown plumeria must have plenty of sunshine. Well-drained, moist potting soil and a container large enough to accommodate the plant’s roots are critical. A phosphorus-rich fertilizer will help keep the plant healthy during the blooming season.

How are plumerias plants propagated?

It is possible to propagate plumeria plants by both cuttings and seeds. Cuttings are easier and preferred as they will provide a flowering plant much sooner. Plant the cuttings about two inches deep into a light potting mix. Water deeply and keep the cuttings moist until they have developed a robust root system.

How can I keep my plumeria blooming?

Meeting the plumeria’s basic needs is the best way to ensure continuous blooms. A minimum of six hours of direct sunlight along with moist, well-drained soil is a priority. Feeding your plumeria with an appropriate fertilizer improves overall health.

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Customer Reviews

Anonymous

Verified Buyer August 6, 2021 at 6:45pm

Plumeria

Plants arrived in good condition but I di not anticipate seeing any blooms until nest season

Anonymous

Verified Buyer June 22, 2020 at 12:38pm

Plumeria plant

Big plant can't wait to see it bloom this year. Healthy well rooted specimen

Plumeria – Zeebee Market

The species Plumeria is named after Charès Plumier, a French botanist who lived in the 17th century. Although plumeria flowers have become closely associated with traditional Hawaiian flower necklaces since the 1800s, they are native to the tropical regions of the Americas, from Mexico to northern South America and the Caribbean. You can buy plumeria, which we grow in the greenhouse, on our website.

In their natural habitat, Plumerias thrive in dry scrub forests, but they have found their place in warm climates around the world, especially in South and Southeast Asia where they grow as garden ornamentals.

In the tropics Plumeria looks like a rather low tree up to 7 meters high, with several roots and thick branches. At the ends of the branches are bunches of leathery leaves up to 50 cm long. The leaves are usually green, sometimes with purple and even black hues. They can be oval or oblong.

In Asia, plumeria flowers adorn Buddhist and Hindu temples. The trees are known as "temple trees".

Plumeria has become famous all over the world for its fantastic fragrant flowers. They are collected in clusters and appear on the tree in spring along with new leaves. They often bloom throughout the summer months. Flowers of different shapes and colors consist of five or more petals and reach 5-10 cm in diameter. Most of all they smell in the morning hours. They can be opened in different ways: from fully open to tulip-shaped. The largest and most fragrant flowers usually form at the beginning of the flowering period. The size of the flower also depends on how old the plant is and how it is cared for.
Flowers have several basic shades: white with yellow in the middle, yellow, red and multi-colored. How intense the red hues are depends largely on the temperature - the warmer it is, the stronger these hues. It also depends on how old the flower is, because the color fades over time when exposed to sunlight.
All parts of the plant contain a white sap which is secreted at the slightest injury. Be careful, the juice can cause skin irritation and allergic reactions.

Cultivation of Plumeria - how to care for Plumeria

How then to grow this exotic beauty? There are three basic rules - VERY direct sunlight, sufficient watering and occasional fertilizing with fertilizers containing relatively high phosphorus.
Plumeria is a large tree that likes to have plenty of room for its roots, so choose a large growing pot. Be sure to have holes in the bottom and drainage. The larger the container, the larger your Plumeria will be and the larger the trunk will be. For seedlings of 2-3 years of age and for rooted branches, it is recommended to use containers from 5 liters. However, always look at the stage of development of the root system. An oversized pot can lead to negative consequences - rotting of the stem and roots.

Choose a looser, more water- and breathable soil mix. It should not lose its airiness over time.

Plumeria care is, for the most part, minimal. Although Plumerias do not like wet feet, they should be watered liberally when watering and then allowed to dry out a bit before being watered again. They also need to be fertilized approximately every two to three weeks throughout the active growing season. Cut back on watering in mid-fall and stop watering completely once the plants go dormant in the winter. Resume regular watering in the spring when new growth appears. A fertilizer with a high phosphate (phosphorus) content, such as 10-30-10, will help encourage flowering. Giving them too much nitrogen will only result in more foliage growth and less flowering. Plumeria can be pruned as needed up to 30cm off the ground in late winter or early spring (before new growth), however any heavy pruning can reduce flowering.

How to grow Plumeria

You don't have to live in the tropics to grow Plumeria in your home garden, you need to be aware of its growing requirements. Plumeria, often grown in the garden as an ornamental shrub or small tree, needs to be grown in well-drained, slightly acidic soil. They also need at least six hours of full sun.

Although the plants are quite tolerant of both salt and wind, they are not cold tolerant and must be protected. Therefore, they should be grown in containers in colder regions. In areas that can be warm most of the time, but still quite prone to cold winters, the plant can be dug up and overwintered indoors. Alternatively, you can submerge a container-grown Plumeria into the ground, bringing it indoors as soon as the temperature starts to drop. Once warm temperatures return in the spring, you can move the plants back outside.

When growing Plumeria in pots, use a coarse, well-draining potting mix - cactus mix or perlite and sand. On hot days in direct sunlight, Plumeria evaporates a lot of water, so the soil must retain moisture, but at the same time pass it. A few minutes after watering, the remaining water should flow out of the vessel through the drainage holes.

Transplantation

Transplantation is usually carried out in the spring. If it is not possible to further increase the size of the pot (since the cultivation pot is already huge), the root system is pruned. The root ball is taken out and cut from the sides and bottom by 5-7 cm, and then planted back into the vessel. The spaces that are then vacated are filled with new fresh soil mass.

Watering

Watering should be regular, the amount depends on the size of the pot and soil mixture. The red plumeria needs less water and is more tolerant of some drought than its relative the Singaporean evergreen plumeria 'Plumeria obtusa'. Always test the moisture content of the soil with your finger, it should be dry to a depth of a few centimeters. If the plant does not have enough moisture, the leaves begin to wither, turn yellow and fall off. The tree can stop in the plant and even be in a period of calm. Excessive watering has almost the same symptoms as dehydration: leaves turn yellow and fall off, roots and stems may begin to rot. This is a nightmare for the Plumeria grower, as it happens after a few days, and the only way to save the plant is to cut it into pieces. Be especially careful when watering on cloudy days and when temperatures fluctuate.

Fertilizer

Plumeria love to eat. Future flowering depends on the fertilization process, and the right nutritional supplements will improve plant health and bloom next year.
Immediately after the spring awakening of Plumeria, when new leaves begin to appear, apply a balanced diet (for example, 10-10-10). Then you start using flowering plant fertilizers with higher levels of phosphorus (middle value) and micronutrients. This leads to more abundant and high-quality flowering. Important: Fertilizers with a high nitrogen content are not suitable for Plumeria, as this leads to rapid growth of branches, elongation of intermediate buds and delays flowering.

Lighting

Plumeria require at least 6 hours of direct sun to bloom regularly. In the shade and with a small amount of sunlight, Plumeria does not bloom, the shoots become thinner and longer.

In autumn, when the light period becomes shorter, Plumeria's growth slows down and it goes into a dormant period (quiet period). Leaves may fall partially or completely. This is normal and should not worry you. In nature, Plumeria stand “naked” for a certain time, when daylight hours become shorter or when the temperature drops to 10 degrees. Place the Plumeria jar in a cool place and water very infrequently. The room can be placed closer to the window, where the temperature is below the average for the room. Leafless feathers take up little space and can overwinter in a cool, dry, and dark place.
The dormant period lasts at least one month. With the onset of spring, Plumeria is placed closer to a sunny window and you can see the first signs of life and often even flowers. Depending on the variety, either flowers or leaves appear first. According to some reports, good lighting during this period (at least for one month) can lead to more stately flowering.
The end of the growing season is the best time to prune. Use a clean, preferably alcohol-washed, knife or pruner. Excessively long or weak and deformed branches are pruned. The resulting residues can be cut into cuttings. Dark or black branches and shoots should also be pruned to prevent the spread of infection.

Plumeria tends to grow and cannot be made meander by pruning. Natural tortuosity is visible where the flowers form, a kind of “fork” is formed with two or three shoots. They also have the same width as the twig. This Plumeria differs from many other plants. Only after this “fork” can one decide whether the plant has bloomed or not, and if the stalk looks like a snake onion, then it is cut off from another plant, and not from a seedling. Sometimes the upper part is cut off to limit the height of the plant, but this can also affect flowering.

Then they look like a cane with leaves on top. Plants that receive enough direct sunlight may develop side shoots after pruning.
You can speed up the appearance of branching by using a paste with lanolin, which includes 6-benzylaminopurine (or BAP for short, from the group of cytokines, plant hormones). Sometimes flower growers use this paste for propagation, for example, phalaenopsis (the paste is applied to dormant buds and after a while a "kid" grows). The top of the cut branch shoot is processed.

Plumeria is propagated by cuttings and seeds.

Propagation from cuttings is the only way to get a special variety of plant. They are usually cut during the growing season from well-developed, healthy branches. The cuttings should be firm at the bottom, because green cuttings take root much worse. If you are going to grow a plant in a vessel, it is better to cut the cuttings like a “fork”, then you will get a more compact climbing plant. The length of the cutting should be 25-40 cm, but shorter cuttings can also be used (they take root a little worse and take longer to grow).
The stalk is cut obliquely with a sharp knife or secateurs, the edges of which are treated with alcohol or other disinfectant. The large cutting surface promotes the formation of many roots. Then dry the cuttings in a dry, warm place for 3-7 days.
If you can cut the cuttings yourself to reduce the chance of getting rotten ends, use the following method. A month before preparing the cuttings, insert a thin round strip of bark 1 cm wide into the place where you plan to cut the cuttings. To prevent the branch from breaking, attach an elastic band along the stem and tie a few sticks. When the time is right, simply cut the cuttings just below the bark sediment. Then the cuttings are processed in the same way as in the traditional harvesting. This method is used for especially sensitive varieties and in cases where the variety is difficult to root, because the likelihood that the roots will form well in this case increases significantly.

Cuttings can be stored for several months in a warm and dry place, but cuttings harvested a few weeks before are best for breaking up. The relatively long shelf life is very convenient and allows cuttings to be transported over long distances or sent by mail. Sometimes it happens that with improper storage or when using dirty cutting tools, the cuttings should rot in places before planting, but this is not visible from the outside. Such a cutting will rot a few days after planting. To prevent this from happening, the cutting edge of questionable cuttings is usually updated. Then you can make sure everything is ok and then dry them for a few days.
The lower end of the cutting is immersed in water and then treated with a special rooting agent. Fungicides are sometimes used to prevent stem rot. Cuttings are planted in a mixture of perlite sand and good soil mixture. It is safer to use the triple pie method. It consists in filling the pot 1/3 of the loose soil mixture, then 1/3 with perlite sand and placing the cuttings in the pot so that the lower edge of the cut is completely covered with perlite. Add loose soil mixture on top. Finally, the bottom insert should be about 10 cm into the mixture. The pot with the cuttings is placed in a warm and bright place. General warmth, a heat source from below, and sunlight help the cuttings to root quickly. Cuttings that are sold in the fall, winter, or early spring need more light.
Plumeria cuttings root within 90 days, usually within two months. The correct sign that the roots have begun to grow is the appearance of leaves, but not flowers. You gradually increase the amount of watering and after a while plant in a larger vessel. It is then cared for as an adult plant. Plumeria grown from a cutting can begin to bloom in the first year if flower buds have formed before the cutting. The plant usually flowers within the next year.
Propagation by seed is rarely used, usually by enthusiasts and professional growers who want to get a new variety, since not all characteristics are thus transferred to another plant. Be patient as the seedlings won't start flowering until 3-5 years old. This is one of the cheapest ways to grow a Plumeria plantation, but also the most insecure. It is impossible to say in advance which flowers you will receive. Although the seedlings will get almost the same flowers as the variety you took the seeds from, it cannot be said that they are the same. Genetic studies have shown that the DNA of the seedlings is different from the mother, although the flowers are very similar. Keep this in mind when buying - real plants of the same variety can only be obtained by propagation using cuttings.
Plumeria flowers are fertilized by wind, insects and even hummingbirds. Double seed pods grow very quickly during the first month and after two months reach their maximum size, sometimes up to 30 cm in length. They can be both short and thick, and thin and long, brown-green shades. Seeds ripen 8-10 months after flowering, then the previously mentioned seed box opens and the seeds scatter in all directions. To prevent this from happening, you can place the seed box in a gas bag (or other thin loose fabric) so that there is room around the box for free air circulation. Or, if you make observations every day, you can observe the moment when the box begins to dry and opens, and then is removed from the tree. There can be from 25 to 100 seeds in a box, depending on the variety. The seeds are similar to maple seeds, with "wings" and are 1 to 4 cm long. They can be stored in a cool, dry place for several months or even years, but germination deteriorates over time. Seeds can either be bought in online stores, or plucked from trees, going to some tropical country.

The seeds are planted at a shallow depth, laid horizontally and the wing removed. In the literature, it is often recommended to plant seeds "tail" up, but in this case it is more difficult to achieve uniform moisture in the soil mixture. Seedlings appear within a week (for more information, see the article "Growing plants from seeds"). Seedlings grow quite quickly in warm sunny places and reach a height of about 30 cm in the first year. After 3 years, they can be 1 meter and higher.
During the first and second year, it is not recommended to put the seedlings on the "wintering".
Seedlings begin to bloom in 3-5 years (sometimes they write various posts on the Internet about Plumeria, which bloomed already 11-15 months after planting). Often the first flower bud appears, but the flower does not develop and dries up, and Plumeria begins to squirm in this place. The next flower bud forms a full flower cluster. Do not be surprised if the first flowering is invisible, usually from the fourth inflorescence you can see what has appeared.
Important: when growing Plumeria from seeds, you can get anything. Some seedlings will never bloom or will bloom little and little. The intensity of the plants of some specimens can also interfere with the process of growing Plumeria in a vessel. You need enough space to grow Plumeria seedlings, and even if that sounds boring, you may have to toss some of the plants or donate them to someone as a light-loving ornamental plant.

Pests

Among insects, spider mites have been observed, which are especially active in dry and hot weather. Among diseases, satellites from a watering can are often found - rotting of the trunk and roots. Sometimes the leaves are affected by the fungus in the form of small dark dots. Then you should spray the leaves with a fungicide and remove the most affected.

home care, growing from seeds, species, photo

Author: Elena N. https://floristics.info/ru/index.php?option=com_contact&view=contact&id=19Category: indoor plants reprinted: Last amendments:

Content

  • Botanical description
  • Briefly on cultivation
  • PLUMARIA PLAMISE
  • PLAMENTION CARE
  • Lights
  • Watering plumeria
  • Spraying
  • Fertilizing
  • Dormancy
  • Pruning
  • Transplanting plumeria

    Representatives of the genus are shrubs or small trees. Homemade plumeria is valued for its flowers - white, pinkish, yellow. But the most important thing is the aroma of these flowers. Plumeria bloom almost all summer. The flowers are large - up to 10 cm in diameter.

    Plumeria is rarely grown in our latitudes, so it is not easy to buy plumeria. Under indoor conditions, the plant can reach a height of 2 m, although it is best to grow plumeria in greenhouses.

    Growing at a glance

    • Flowering: lasts almost all summer from the end of spring.
    • Light: bright sunlight: the plant needs at least 6 hours of direct sunlight daily to flower.
    • Temperature: from mid-spring to autumn - 25-30 ºC, in autumn the temperature is gradually lowered, and the plant should spend the winter at 16-17 ºC.
    • Watering: moderate, in spring and summer - as the topsoil dries out, in winter it is enough so that the earthen ball does not dry out completely.
    • Air humidity: increased. It is recommended to keep the plant pot on a pallet with wet pebbles and spray the leaves with warm water in the morning and evening in the heat.
    • Top dressing: with the appearance of the first young leaves - twice a month with a mineral fertilizer for flowering plants. From the beginning of autumn, feeding is gradually reduced, and in October it is completely stopped.
    • Rest period: 1-1.5 months from mid-October to March. Before going to rest, the plant sheds its leaves.
    • Pruning: after the period is out, based on the fact that the flowers are formed at the ends of the shoots of the current year.
    • Transplant: in early spring: young plants - annually, adults - once every two years.
    • Substrate: two parts of soddy soil and one part of humus, peat soil and sand.
    • Propagation: by seeds and cuttings.
    • Pests: spider mites.
    • Diseases: stem and root rot, untimely leaf fall due to improper conditions and insufficient care.
    • Properties: plumeria juice is poisonous!

    Read more about growing plumeria below.

    Photos of plumeria

    See large photos of plumeria with the name of the genus and species. Will open in a new window!

    Plumeria care at home

    Lighting

    Southern windows are considered the optimal location for a plumeria indoor plant, since the plant will bloom only if it is under direct sunlight for at least 6 hours a day. In principle, the plant grows well on both western and eastern windows. On the north side, the plant will not bloom due to lack of lighting. Indoor plumeria can be taken out in the summer to the garden, but the plant must be accustomed to direct rays gradually, as well as provide protection from drafts and precipitation. Also, do not put the plant in the sun immediately after purchase - burns may appear on the leaves.

    Temperature

    From mid-spring through the summer, the plumeria plant needs a high temperature of 25 to 30 °C. In autumn, the temperature is gradually reduced, and in winter it should not be lower than 16 ° C.

    Watering Plumeria

    In spring and summer, indoor plumeria is watered immediately after the topsoil has dried. Water the plant with soft settled water. In winter, watering is reduced, making sure that the earth ball does not dry out. Water should not stagnate in a pot - this can destroy the plant, therefore, when the temperature drops or on rainy days, the plumeria is watered very carefully.

    Spraying

    Plumeria at home responds very well to spraying during the growing season. Water for spraying should be taken soft, let it stand for at least a day before spraying. Also, the pot can be placed on a tray with wet pebbles or expanded clay, making sure that the water in the tray does not touch the bottom of the pot. Water should not fall on the flowers.

    Top dressing

    After the beginning of the appearance of new leaves in spring, the plant is fed with complex fertilizers. After that, the plumeria is fed with fertilizer for flowering plants twice a month. If the plant stands outside in the summer, then after a time the plumeria can be fertilized foliarly - the fertilizer is diluted twice from the concentration proposed by the manufacturer and the leaves are sprayed on both sides. Do this in the evening once a week and a half. With the advent of autumn, the frequency of feeding is reduced, and in winter it is completely stopped.

    Dormant period

    When growing plumeria indoors, the plant goes into dormancy in winter - depending on the type of plant, dormancy lasts 3-6 weeks. At this time, the plant usually sheds only the old leaves, while the younger ones remain on the tree. At the end of the dormant period, new leaves and flowers begin to appear on the plants.

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    Pruning

    When the plant comes out of dormancy, it must be pruned. When forming a plumeria crown, it must be taken into account that flowers appear at the ends of shoots that have grown in the same year. For pruning, use a very sharp knife or secateurs, which must first be treated with alcohol. Cut branches can be used for propagation by cuttings.

    Plumeria transplant

    Plumeria flower is transplanted in early spring: young trees every year, older ones every two years. The pot should be 2-3 cm larger than the previous one. If there is no larger pot, then you can cut the roots by 5 centimeters, and fill the remaining space in the pot with fresh substrate. The soil is made up of turf, peat, humus soil and sand (2:1:1:1). At the bottom you need to pour expanded clay or broken bricks to 1/5 of the height of the pot. Some flower growers pour eggshells instead of expanded clay.

    Growing from seeds

    Seeds are sown in pots 6 cm in diameter. When shoots appear and the root system gets stronger, the young are transferred to 9-centimeter pots. The earth mixture is used the same as when transplanting plumeria. Plants grown from seeds usually differ from the parent plumeria. Home plumeria usually begins to bloom in the second or third year.

    Propagation by cuttings

    Propagation cuttings should be cut at an oblique angle, and is best in late winter - early spring. The cut point is dipped in water, and then in a root formation stimulator. They plant a plumeria stalk in a tricky way: the pot is filled in three layers - a third with a soil mixture (described above), a third with perlite and again a soil mixture. The cutting is placed vertically so that its lower end is completely in perlite. It is advisable to use the bottom heating, because. the temperature for normal rooting should be at the level of 25-28 ° C. Provide bright lighting (if necessary - fluorescent lamps), water carefully. The appearance of leaves indicates the rooting of the plumeria cuttings - this usually happens after 2-3 months. Watering is gradually increased, then transferred to a large pot and looked after as an adult specimen. Flowers usually appear the next year, or maybe the same.

    Toxicity

    Plumeria sap is poisonous, may cause irritation if it comes into contact with mucous membranes or skin. If the juice gets on the skin or mucous membrane, you should immediately rinse this place with plenty of clean running water.

    Diseases and pests

    Plumeria sheds leaves. If a plumeria sheds its leaves before the winter comes, then you should not be afraid - this is a natural phenomenon.

    Plumeria does not grow. If the plant has stopped growing, the leaves lose turgor, hang down, turn yellow, fall off - most likely the plumeria is not watered enough.

    • Periwinkle: growing from seeds, types and varieties

    Plumeria rots. If we add rotting stems and roots to the above symptoms, then, most likely, watering is excessively plentiful.

    Plumeria pests. The main enemy of plumeria is the spider mite.

    Species

    Plumeria alba

    It grows naturally in the Antilles. These trees grow up to 10 m in height. The leaves are linear in shape, the underside of the leaf plate is densely covered with white hairs, the edges of the leaf are slightly raised; the leaf reaches a length of 30 cm, and a width of up to 7. The flowers smell very pleasant, not very large - up to 2.5 cm in diameter, white with a yellow eye.

    Plumeria rubra

    Grows mainly in Venezuela and Mexico. Trees lower than white plumeria - up to 5 m in height, deciduous. The leaves are ovoid, up to 15 cm wide, almost 0.5 m long; the underside of the leaf is both pubescent and smooth; leaf apex is usually blunt, but sometimes sharply pointed. Flowers are collected in brushes at the top of the shoots, up to 5 cm in diameter. Depending on the variety, the flowers are pink, white, red, yellow, purple. Different varieties may also have different leaf shapes.


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