How much water does a pine tree need


How Much Water Does A Pine Tree Drink A Day – Everything You Need To Know!

Lawn Care | Facts & Problems

ByMark Jaoson Updated on

Let us tell you one thing – human needs water, and plants need too, and there is no rocket science! But do you know how much water does a pine tree drink a day?

Well, the basic rule for drinking pine is 10 gallons of water for every single inch of tree diameter. That means a 12-inch plant will absorb nearly 120 gallons of water. There are also records that average pine trees can absorb up to 150 gallons of water a day when there is unlimited water.

Often the amount of water consumed varies by species and size. So if you want to get familiar with the details,stay connected with us till the end!

1 How Much Water Does A Pine Tree Drink A Day?

2 How Often to Water a Pine Tree

2. 1 Expert’s Advice

3 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

3.1 Do pine trees drink a lot of water?

3.2 How do you know if a pine tree has too much water?

3.3 How long can a pine tree go without water?

4 Final Words!

How Much Water Does A Pine Tree Drink A Day?

In a nutshell, you should apply a total of 10 gallons of water for every 1-inch diameter while watering– this is the clear-cut answer on how much water does a pine tree need daily. While measuring the trunk, take the diameter at the height of your knee.

Contrarily, you canalso measure the diameter byholding a ruler or a piece of dip-stick to get actual inches.

Feel free to give this basic watering formula a look to know how you can measure:

The diameter of tree x 5 minutes = total time of watering

Make sure to water your pine tree on a daily basis after planting in order to establish durable roots. It absorbs around aninch of water per week from home irrigation or rain. We suggest maintaining your tree by regular watering in the first one-two years of tree’s life.

Do you want a detailed answer on how much water do pine trees need?Well, when it comes down to a healthy, vigorous tree of 100-feet tall with about 200,000 leaves, it can easily absorb a total of 11,000 gallons of water.

Indeed, Pine trees can absorb different amounts of water at different stages from planting to the end. Pine needles play a vital role in moisture collection. And needless to say, this particular plant is capable of absorbing water through its needles.

A mature Eastern pine can consume more than 100 gallons of water per day.

And guess what? They can absorb even more when there is unlimited water.

How Often to Water a Pine Tree

If your pines seem pretty small in size, they need a certain amount of water and slightly wet soil, ask why? Because these are still growing their roots and other parts gradually.

Pine species like Pinus pinea (Italian stone pine) and Pinus Virginiana(scrub pine/Virginia pine) are able to grow indoor places for a pretty short period of time.

But remember, you shouldn’t allow their soil to easily dry out, meaning you need to deliver adequate amounts of water after a while, for which they can grow way quicker than usual.

Apart from that, if your tree seems old, ensure watering it when the weather appears to be drier enough. Feel free to give your old pine trees a large amount of water before winter arrives.

The pine tree won’tget damaged or ruined by strong winds or cold temperatures, especially if it’s well hydrated.

In the fewest possible words, your older pine tree may need water only once per year, or sometimes may require it every once per month, depending on the overall weather condition.

Expert’s Advice

Applying excessive amount of water can be equally harmful! So try to stay away from providing too much water, unless your plant is exposing any significant symptoms of drought field.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Do pine trees drink a lot of water?

Pine trees need more water in the summer months or hot days. Less water is required in spring and autumn. And it needs a very small amount of water in winter or some of the time it doesn’t need water at all, yep.

How do you know if a pine tree has too much water?

Simple, when the area around the pine tree seems very wet. The needles of the pine tree dry up or fade and fall off. Moreover, the needles turn brown and if algae or mushrooms are seen near the tree, it means that the pine tree has loaded excessive water.

How long can a pine tree go without water?

Without water, an average pine tree may seem unaffected in the first year. But in the next year, the mature pine needles turn kind of yellowish. If this situation continues, the tree may eventually die by dropping the needle.

Final Words!

Hope you understand all the nooks and crannies on how much water does a pine tree drink a day. From planting a tree to getting an evergreen pine tree, it should be watered properly.

Pine trees need to dealwith drought from time to time, depending on climate and compensate for needs through rainfall. If it doesn’t rain, be sure to soak your pine tree roots thoroughly with plenty of water.

Of course, this is very important to know if you want to take better care of the pine tree and keep it alive for long. So keep the plant nourished with the right amount of water, and happy planting!

You Can Also Read:

  • How To Pick Up Pine Cones in Yard? 6 Ways for You
  • What to Charge Per Hour to Spread Mulch? Know the Exact Pricing Tactics!
  • What Is Considered A Small Lawn? Know and Expand Your Ideas

Mark Jaoson

Hi, I’m Mark Jason, the founder Of Inside The Yard. Anyone who feels inspired by the beauty of greenery, welcome to Inside Yard, a place that appreciates gems like you. I and my team would feel honored to have you join us here, where we share multiple contents on maintaining and creating your own green space. Whether it’s a garden you dream to make or simply for the love of your potted plant staying at the balcony, we want to help you live and love through this green peace.

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How Much Water Does a Pine Tree Need? (Explained) – LeafyJournal

Almost all of us admired those landscapes with pine trees or the next-door neighbor’s backyard adorned with tall pines. And so if you wish to have a few pine trees at your place, we won’t get surprised! 

While planning to plant pine trees there are a few queries you might have. For example, how much water you’ll need to provide a pine tree. 

You can get the answer here in brief along with much other detail that you can’t avoid while taking care of a pine tree!

How much water does a pine tree need?

Pine trees require different amounts of watering during different phases of their life. A mature pine tree needs 1 to 3 inches deep water in its soil every week, which requires 1.4-1.5 gallons of water every day. Whereas a baby pine needs to be watered twice or thrice in a week 1 to 2 inches deeply. 

Table of Contents

Pine trees are very popular and adored all around the world. Talk about their height or those aesthetic leaves, pine trees are beautiful in every way.

Pine trees at different stages require a different amount of water. Moreover, how much water they need depends on a pine tree’s diameter too.  

Let’s know pines, at their different stages, needs how much water! 

Mature/Full-grown pine tree:

Though a full-grown pine tree doesn’t need watering every other day, once in a week they should be provided 10 gallons of water. That means a mature pine needs 1.42-1.5 gallons of water every day to stay healthy.

Newly planted pine tree:

A pine that’s just been placed in the earth surely requires much water to strengthen its roots. Based on the diameter of the trunk of the tree, 1 to 1.5 gallons per inch diameter is the daily need of a newly planted pine.

Baby/small pine tree:

Baby pine trees or pine trees are a bit bigger version of newly planted ones. These tiny pines require less than newly grown ones. Baby pine trees demand about 0.25 – 0.4 gallons of water a day until the shrubs grow taller. 

They should be kept 2 inches damp all the time.

Ponderosa pine tree:

Ponderosa, a species of pines is known for its high drought toleration ability. But while growing from their early stage they need much water. 

That’s why they should be watered 1 inch a day, which according to the trunk diameter rule is equivalent to 1.5 to 2 gallons for a day.

Large pine tree:

Pine trees that are longer and larger than average ones need 1.4 -1.5 gallons of water in their root daily. This means a damp ground of 18-20 inches should be maintained. 

However, they don’t need to be watered every day since they are mature pine trees. 

Potted pine tree:

A pine tree planted on a pot should be watered deeply. To grow and stay green they need 0.4-0.5 gallons of water daily. To hold its hydration, it’s better to keep 1 inch from the top moisture all the time.

How do I know if my pine tree needs water?

You might be sitting in calm thinking your pine tree is getting enough water. But what if you’re guessing it wrong? To know if your pine tree needs water, you have to observe a few signs thrown by the tree as well as test the soil.  

Dry soil:

Dry soil around the root is the most common sign that your pine is underwatered. Dig a few inches deeper near the root with a screwdriver and if you can’t do that smoothly because the soil is hard to go through then your tree needs water. 

You can also test the soil by taking a plum full of soils from 5-6 inches deeper, If the soil there isn’t cool or soft, the tree is crying for water.

Unseasonable leaves shedding:

If your pine tree is dropping leaves earlier than usual, like in the summer, then it’s because it lacks moisture.

Discolored needles:

Needles that have lost the natural color are another signal that your pine tree is not getting enough water. Needles of a pine tree, when don’t get enough moisture turns yellow or brown and fall off at the end.

How often do I need to water my pine trees? How long can a pine tree go without water?  

Except for newly planted ones, pine trees don’t need frequent watering. Mature pine trees need watering once a week to look healthy and green. But on dry days, regular watering is needed to avoid drought stress.

Newly planted pine trees require water 2 or 3 times a week for the first 2 years. Thus they can settle their roots firmly.

Pine trees have a natural ability to put up with dry weather. Even in the driest areas, a mature pine tree can live for around 6 months without any water.

However, where the tree is planted also decides its longevity without water. Pine trees that are planted in clay soil cannot go long without water. But a pine that’s growing in sandy earth can survive without water for a good time.

How to water a pine tree?

If you have a pine tree, then you must learn how to take care of it properly. So that it grows healthy and lives long. However, how healthy and green a pine tree can look depends much on how it’s been being watered. 

Here we’ve shared five easy steps following which you can water your pine tree correctly.

Use a hose:

The first step is to arrange a hosepipe to water the tree adequately. Any hose, soaker, or garden one will do the work.

Connect it to the water source:

Then find a nearby water source to connect the hose. Make sure the water isn’t too hot or salted.

Set the water pressure:

Before starting watering fix the water pressure to a light stage. If it’s a baby pine, then keeping the pressure high can harm the plant.

Water from various angles:

Turning the water source on, make the water flow in slow motion. Water the surface around the pine tree from different angles. 

Take breaks during irrigation:

Lastly, maintain a break of 10-15 minutes after each cycle and check the moist level around the root area with a water probe or screwdriver.

Can you overwater a pine tree?

Watering a pine tree more than its requirement is a big no. It can invite various problems for the tree which can make you work too hard to save it.

Pine trees usually don’t need a lot of water after it has reached the grown-up stage. They can be watered once a week in the depth of 1-3 inches from the base. Moreover, a few species of pines are highly able to carry on without water, even for months. 

If you overwater a pine tree the soil pockets around it can get clogged with water thus the roots may drown and be destroyed. Slowly the tree will lose its greenery as the needles will turn brown and then drop excessively. 

Overwatering can make the whole tree brown and put an end to its life. So you cannot and should not water pine trees excessively.

How to tell if a pine tree is overwatered?

To avoid any major damage caused by overwatering it’s wise to know the symptoms earlier. Here’s how can you know if a pine tree is overwatered:

Saturated soil:

The soil around a pine tree shows the first sign of overwatering. While observing the ground if you find the surface too wet and muddy, take an attempt to go a bit deep into the ground. 

If the soil from 6-10inch depth feels muddy and watery then you know the answer.

Change in the needles:

Too much water can cause discoloration to pine needles. Those green needles will suddenly turn brownish having spots on them when overwatered.

Needle drop:

Pines are evergreen trees. So they hardly drop their needle in bulks unless there is an imbalance. If you notice too much needle fall, it’s a result of overwatering the tree.

Mushrooms:

Mushrooms need a drastically damp area to grow. So if you see mushrooms around the trees’ roots, it’s because the soil there is too damp. 

Cankers:

A rotten root creates fungus that causes canker in a pine tree’s bark. So if you find any spot or discharge in the bark, it’s overwatered.

Final Thoughts: 

A fully grown pine tree needs 1. 4 to 1.5 gallons of water every day. But they don’t need to be watered constantly as watering once a week covers the demand. A newly planted pine tree requires 1 to 1.5 gallons of water each day, regularly. Generally, pine’s water absorption depends much on their age.

How much water a tree consumes per day. Transpiration of plants and trees.: uvova — LiveJournal

How much water a tree consumes per day. Transpiration of plants and trees.: uvova — LiveJournal ?
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year and during which there were human casualties, the automobile infrastructure was partially destroyed, and on TV they showed terrible pictures of houses floating down the river, I thought about the real reasons for such a serious increase in the water level.

Official versions of such large-scale floods: snowmelt, heavy rains and large-scale logging of the taiga to sell timber to China:

"Russian President Vladimir Putin agreed with the opinion of one of the residents of the Irkutsk region, who said that the flood would not be so large-scale, if not for massive illegal logging."
(Interfax)

El-Murid soon wrote about the real cause of the flood in Tulun:

"The catastrophe with the rise of water by 14 meters is not explained by some kind of rain or snowmelt, as the official version says. The explanation is more prosaic: Irkutsk HPP released water, raising the water level in the Bratsk reservoir from the normative 392 meters to 402 meters - the maximum mark possible. The task was to generate additional electricity for BrAZ, which is part of Rusal.The result was the impossibility of discharging water after not very heavy rains - downstream from Bratskoye reservoir Ust-Ilimsk with 80 thousand inhabitants and dozens of other villages. Therefore, at this stage, Tulun was sacrificed, in which there are half as many people."

The answer to the question was found, but another one arose: how much can deforestation affect the increase (release) of water? After all, trees consume a considerable amount of moisture, pumping out up to 200 liters daily (especially in spring). In addition:

"The shrinking area of ​​forests is not able to carry out snow retention on the same scale, as a result of which snowmelt occurs over a vast area with much greater dynamics, this leads to more dynamic and sharp rises in rivers, which the existing irrigation facilities cannot cope with , calculated for a different flood regime. Endless cuttings contribute to the drainage of swamps - the basis of the taiga, which leads to the appearance of dry wood massifs, which burn on an unprecedented scale. "

It can be added that in the forest lowlands, when trees disappear, moss dies, a square meter of which can hold up to 4 liters of water on average.

For example, in our Brotherville, too, every year the number of trees slowly but surely decreases, and the water level in the lake rises, gradually flooding the edge of the forest. But our situation is the opposite - because. the reason for this was the beavers, who made a real mess: heaped trees and built dams, blocking their paths to the ditches for the outflow of excess water.

But my site itself is also in a lowland, and with the onset of serious heavy rains or during the spring melting of snow, the ground on it turns into a sponge and puddles appear in some places. But I noticed that the lowest part of the site, where spruces and willows grow, is much drier than the upper one - where there are no trees at all. And this is even despite the presence of drainage, through which a significant part of the water goes into the forest. This begs the question: how much moisture can trees absorb? And can they drain the area? I went online to find out.

For some reason, there was very little information, but we managed to find something. For example, I discovered such a thing as transpiration. I don’t remember, we studied this phenomenon in childhood at biology lessons, because of the prescription of years and due to progressive senile insanity, I managed to forget a lot. and the water slowly leaves:

Spruce is the most suitable tree for draining the soil, because. its root system is located literally under the grass roots, i.e. quite shallow. Therefore, it is easy to transplant. In addition, practice shows that spruces have a high survival rate and endurance during floods / droughts. But shallow roots are also its minus - they most often fall during hurricanes. The second minus is the only tree that the bark beetle eats.

Oak is also not bad, but after many years, when it grows up, your grandchildren will curse you for it! )

Therefore, I tell you, the best option for our latitudes near Moscow is birch or pine:

- due to the lack of accurate data and difficulties in the calculation. .

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#trees, #flood

Tags: #trees, #flood, Brotherville, Mordor, apocalypse, bloggers, reminders, politics, events

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  • Daily water consumption for transpiration by a whole woody plant

    SUMMARY

    Calculated daily water consumption for transpiration by whole trees and shrubs. Improved methods for determining the leaf area and total leaf surface. Populus pyramidalis has a high transpiration rate and total leaf area, and the amount of water it evaporates per day can exceed 2000 kg. Of the shrubs, Cotinus coggygria (from 154. 0 to 364.0 kg) is able to evaporate the largest amount of water per day, as it is a large shrub with a high transpiration rate. The lowest values ​​are characterized by Crataegus altaica (maximum 172.8 kg), Ligustrum vulgare (1.45-4.72 kg) and Cornus sanquinea (2.25-15.66 kg).

    ABSTRACT

    Daily water consumption on transpiration by entire trees and bushes is calculated. Methods for determining leaf area and total leaf surface are improved. Populus pyramidalis differs by high values ​​of transpiration intensity and total leaf surface, and the amount of water evaporated per day can exceed 2000 kg. Out of bushes Cotinus coggygria is able to drain the greatest amount of water per day (from 154.0 to 364.0 kg), as it is a large bush characterized by high intensity of transpiration. Crataegus altaica (maximum 172.8 kg), Ligustrum vulgare (1.45–4.72 kg) and Cornus sanquinea (2. 25–15.66 kg) have the lowest values.

    Introduction

    The tasks of studying the water regime of plants can be very diverse. They are connected with the solution of many important issues, such as the development of new territories, landscaping and protective afforestation. The daily water consumption for transpiration by woody plants is an important indicator of the possibility of recommending them for planting in places with different soil water availability and determining the degree of their influence on the microclimate.

    The total leaf area significantly affects the water loss of individual plants. Large leaf area plants generally transpire more than small leaf area plants. There are large differences in transpiration per unit leaf area among different species. However, these differences can be misleading, because the unequal total leaf area can compensate for the difference in intensity per unit leaf area. For example, the rate of transpiration per unit leaf area of ​​frankincense pine is lower than that of some hardwoods, but the total leaf area of ​​one pine seedling is so much greater that water loss per seedling is also greater. Thus, one frankincense pine tree can lose as much water per day as a hardwood tree with a crown of similar size [6].

    In E. Libbert [7], one can find data that one birch tree loses up to 400 liters of water per day during transpiration, and a beech plantation returns to the atmosphere through transpiration about 60% of the precipitation falling on it. K. Willy and W. Dethier [1] indicate the ability of a medium-sized tree to transpire more than 200 liters of water per day, 1 ha of corn - 3,500,000 liters of water per growing season, and 1 ha of a mature maple forest - about twice as much, while cacti in The Arizona desert consumes no more than 2750 liters of water per 1 hectare for a whole year. According to S.I. Popova, N.V. Yakovleva [8] 17-year-old poplar growing along the canal evaporates 73 m 3 water, pedunculate oak - 20 m 3 , and green ash - 13 m 3 .

    A single tree can evaporate 200-400 liters per day, and a deciduous forest in the humid Southern Appalachians loses 42-55 cm of water per year. Several hundred kilograms of water are consumed by plants for every kilogram of dry matter produced, and about 95% of this water simply passes through the plant and is lost during transpiration [6].

    In the hot climate of Central Asia, water loss by one vine bush in areas well supplied with soil moisture can exceed 2 liters per hour [5].

    The loss of water by plants for transpiration can be considered as its exchange for carbon, and in this sense, transpiration is necessary for plant growth. Consequently, fast-growing plants require a lot of water, much more than is contained in the plants themselves. The rate of water loss depends mainly on temperature, relative humidity and air movement [11].

    Methods for determining the water consumption of whole plants are complex and difficult to implement in the field, since they cannot fully reflect the natural environment of plant growth and its use is limited. Let's dwell on some of them.

    Determination of water loss in whole plants, uprooted with roots and exposed for an hour in the same place where the plant was before the start of the experiment, was carried out by O. Stocker [14] when working in the deserts of Egypt. An interesting method for determining the water consumption of a whole tree, developed by E.V. Zhemchuzhnikov, A.V. Veretennikov and A.A. Kotelnikova [2]. Accounting for water lost for transpiration is carried out by weighing whole crowns (which are sawn off from the trunk immediately after felling the tree) on special scales, previously suspended on brackets. The Anwelk method developed by A. Arland [10] allows you to quickly study transpiration in a large series of plants in the field using technical scales. In this case, whole plants are removed from the soil with the upper part of the root system, which is immersed in paraffin in order to prevent water loss. To determine the loss of water by whole plants, gasometric methods can be used, based on direct measurement of the amount of water vapor released by leaves during transpiration [10; 12; 13].

    The aim of the work was to improve methods for determining the area of ​​leaves and total leaf surface, as well as to study the characteristics of daily water consumption for transpiration by whole woody plants introduced in the Chui valley.

    Research materials and methods.

    The objects of the study were deciduous woody plants of two life forms introduced in the Botanical Garden of the National Academy of Sciences of the Kyrgyz Republic: 15 species of trees and 16 species of shrubs.

    To calculate the daily water consumption for transpiration by a whole woody plant, we simultaneously determined the area of ​​individual leaves and the total leaf surface during the growing season according to the method developed by us [3; four]. The proposed method allows us to determine the total area of ​​leaves in woody plants with a simple leaf plate. Using stereometric formulas for calculating the volume of the crown of woody plants and the area of ​​leaves, the total leaf surface was determined. Measurements of the total leaf area of ​​an individual tree or shrub should be taken every 10-15 days during the growing season.

    The intensity of transpiration was determined using field transpyrometers according to the Yevtushenko-Shpot method [9]. Calculations of the daily water consumption for transpiration by a whole tree and shrub were carried out twice a month from June to August.

    Research results and discussion

    Table 1 shows the minimum and maximum daily water consumption for transpiration by a whole tree for 2002–2004. The experiments performed showed that the daily water consumption for transpiration of the studied tree species was not the same, which is due to differences in the data on the intensity of transpiration and the total leaf area. During the day, the lowest transpiration rates occur in the month of May, when the leaf surface of trees is just beginning to form. In the future, as the size of the leaves increases, the amount of transpired water from the total leaf surface of the tree increases. In September, with the beginning of leaf fall, plants reduce the mass of evaporated moisture, as the total leaf surface decreases.

    Table 1.

    Daily water consumption for transpiration by a whole tree, kg Species 2002 2003 2004 Min. Max. Min. Max. Min. Max. 1

    Populus pyramidalis

    660.0 2007.5 1045.0 2832.5 1047.6 1935.0 2 Crataegus altaica 83.20 165.3 121.5 148.5 124.2 172.8 3 Juglans regia 192.0 244. 4 190.0 342.0 215.2 294.0 4 Quercus robur 223.2 572.0 211.2 379.5 291.0 390.0 5 Quercus imbricaria 326.8 602.0 303.4 389.5 369.6 466.4 6 Acer pseudoplatanus 336.0 513.5 179.4 350.0 204.0 402.0 7 Acer platanoides 323. 2 646.4 240.0 299.0 414.4 518.0 8 Acer saccharinum 682.5 1155.0 462.0 693.0 616.0 834.9 9 Carpinus betulus 142.0 255.3 152.0 168.0 111.6 219.8 10 Ulmus pinnato-ramosa 176.0 448.0 195.0 240.0 210.0 252. 0 11 Sorbus intermedia 186.0 240.0 168.0 248.5 254.4 282.4 12 Aesculus hippocastanum 297.0 442.2 126.0 297.0 251.6 370.0 13 Cercis canadensis 150.0 276.0 150.0 300.0 130.0 286.0 14 Padus racemosa 168.0 240. 8 108.0 148.0 112.3 191.8 15 Betula procurva 275.0 391.6 265.0 400.0 224.0 302.4

    Since, Populus pyramidalis is characterized by high values ​​of transpiration intensity and total leaf surface, the amount of water evaporated by it per day can exceed 2000 kg. Another example, Aesculus hippocastanum and Cercis canadensis , characterized by a large total leaf area, but having a low transpiration intensity, which ultimately affected the daily water consumption for transpiration, not exceeding 440.2 and kg respectively. More than 1000 kg per day is able to evaporate

    Three-year data on the daily water consumption for transpiration by a whole tree indicate that it depends on both the total leaf area and the intensity of transpiration. The low intensity of transpiration of some tree species, characterized by a large total leaf area, is of paramount importance for the amount of water evaporated per day.

    Table 2 presents data on the daily water consumption for transpiration by a whole bush. A significant amount of water per day is able to evaporate Cotinus coggygria (from 154.0 to 364.0 kg) , as it is a large shrub with a high transpiration rate. More than 100 kg per day can be transpired by Rhus typhina, Viburnum lantana and Philadelphus lewisii, although the first due to the high intensity of transpiration, the latter two are due to the higher total leaf surface. Enough water evaporated per day Elaeagnus angustifolia (up to 91.80 kg), Forsythia suspense (up to 92.80 kg), Spiraea vanhouttei3. The lowest values ​​are Ligustrum vulgare (1.45–4.72 kg) and Cornus sanquinea (2. 25–15.66 kg). The remaining types of shrubs occupy a middle position. Table 2.

    Daily water consumption for transpiration by whole shrubs, kg

    No. Species 2002 2003 2004
    Min. Max. Min. Max. Min. Max.
    1 Rhus typhina 27. 60 105.75 32.43 86.60 23.50 63.45
    2 Syringa amurensis 15.90 24.96 12.60 45.21 16.55 39.00
    3 Elaeagnus angustifolia 21.90 91.80 16.30 68.64 12.00 60.00
    4 Philadelphus lewisii 37.00 194.30 42.00 103. 50 56.70 117.00
    5 Forsythia suspensa 36.00 57.00 16.50 56.70 25.60 92.80
    6 Euonymus maackii 18.26 29.48 15.27 27.60 15.50 29.58
    7 Viburnum lantana 33.00 133.50 38.00 112.20 49.20 102.00
    8 Cheonomeles japonica 10. 76 20.00 7.51 13.44 7.90 18.00
    9 Symphoricarpus albus 9.90 32.60 6.00 35.90 6.20 36.38
    10 Ligustrum vulgare 1.45 3.65 1.80 6.20 2.72 4.72
    11 Cornus sanquinea 2.25 15.66 2.22 9.90 3. 20 8.10
    12 Berberis oblonga 7.25 14.50 7.10 13.10 6.75 9.57
    13 Cotinus coggygria 154.00 364.00 132.00 216.00 133.00 179.20
    14 Spiraea vanhouttei 33.30 83.70 16.00 38.00 27.00 59.00
    15 Caragana boisii 14. 00 32.60 16.00 42.00 26.00 44.00
    16 Spiraea losiocarpa 10.00 20.00 8.50 14.20 8.20 15.00

    Conclusion. The data obtained on the daily consumption of water for transpiration by a whole woody plant make it possible to determine the degree of influence of a particular species on air humidification, and therefore on the microclimate. In addition, according to the results of our research, it is possible to recommend trees and shrubs that differ in the amount of daily water consumption for transpiration for planting in areas with different water availability. The rational formation of tree plantations, taking into account their need for irrigation, makes it possible to save irrigation water, which is an important factor in summer.

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    9. Shpota L.A. Field methods and devices for the physiological control of the state of plants in the field and natural growing conditions. Bishkek: Ilim, 1992. 154 p.
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