How to extract resin from trees


The handcraft of resin extraction - The "Pecherei"

As you already know, the gum base of our Alpengummi consists of the natural raw materials tree resin & beeswax. But how and where is the tree resin actually obtained?

What do you actually understand by the craft of resin harvesting, in german “Pecherei”?

“Pechen” (pitching) is the name given to the process of extracting resin from black pine trees and is a centuries-old tradition in Austria. Especially the handcraft of resin harvesting in Lower Austria - the “Pecherei”, which was included in the UNESCO list of intangible cultural heritage in 2011, has long strengthened the region and is a proud craft. In the last century, however, the valuable domestic resin was displaced by petroleum products and imported cheap goods.

We at Alpengummi would therefore like to seize the opportunity to help this old craft regain recognition.We therefore do not only want to use the resin as an ingredient, but also help this dying craft to flourish again by promoting resin, the “Pecherei” and transparency about the ingredients (which is actually unusual for conventional gum bases!).

The “Pecher” first removes the bark of the black pine © Bergfalke GmbH

The annual work of the “Pecher”

The working year of a “Pecher” (the name of the person who wins the resin) is split up - according to the seasons - with different main activities. In principle, seasonal work begins in spring, when the most demanding work is done by cutting off the bark of the trees.

Afterwards, the resin can flow from the “wound” into a pot - led by wooden slats. After harvesting, when winter is approaching and the trees are hibernating, so to speak, other work is done. For example, the wooden slats for the next season are made and the tools are brought back into shape so that the work process can begin again smoothly in spring!

The resin can flow along the wooden slats into the pot © Bergfalke GmbH

Effects on the trees

The traditional handcraft of the “Pecherei” takes care that the effects on the tree are kept as low as possible! In the early days of resin harvesting, the bark was burned off over the entire circumference of the trunk, causing the tree to die. Nowadays, however, the modern form of resin extraction does not affect the tree’s viability, as not all the bark is removed. This allows the tree sap to continue to flow, thus ensuring that the crown is supplied with water and nutrients. After the trees have been tapped for resin extraction, they can continue to live (they just grow a little slower) and can even be harvested again. Although the wood from these trees is generally of lower quality and is therefore mostly used as firewood, the cross-sections also have a high designer value due to their interesting shape!

A cross section of a pine tree used for resin extraction © Bergfalke GmbH

The most used tree for resin extraction

The black pine is the tree most commonly used for harvest extraction in Austria. Already in the glorious Roman times it was used for resin extraction, as it is the tree with the highest resin content of all conifers. Resin was used in many areas, including to waterproof ships (so without resin, shipping would not have been possible!). Under Empress Maria Theresa, the foothills of the Alps in the southern region of the Vienna Basin were reforested with the Lower Austrian black pine (pinus nigra austriaca) in order to stop erosion and harvest this valuable raw material.

The handcraft of the “Pecherei” - a tradition in Austria

For a long time, resin extraction and processing represented the economic basis of life for many families in the region. After the professional craft had lost its value in the 1950s (in its peak, around 7000 families could still make a living from this craft), black pine was also used less. Nowadays, only a handful of “Pecher” practice this craft, which is why harvest extraction in Lower Austria was included in the UNESCO list of Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2011. Alpengummi would like to help this beautiful craft to gain new recognition and support the “Pecherei” in Austria!

The KEAföhrene Association

The association “[KEAföhrene]()” owes its name to the colloquial word “Kien”, which describes the particularly resinous parts of the tree (e. g. also in the word Kienspäne). The “verkienten” parts of the tree are particularly durable and tough and so in dialect not only the trees but also people with seemingly similar characteristics are called “Keaföhrene”. The members of the non-profit KEAföhrene - association consist of persons, companies and communities, who have made it their goal to bring the associated cultural heritage to the public. They offer a colourful mixture of products, information and activities around the black pine and the “Pecherei”. Alpengummi is also a member of this unique association.

With this article we would like to show you that traditional handicrafts in Austria should get more attention again. Because promoting the local economy and especially regional products is not only good for the environment, but also for ourselves!

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How to Forage & Use Pine Resin

Learn how to forage and harvest pine resin, then use it to make a first aid salve, a decongestant balm, and a pine resin sore muscle rub!

Learn how to harvest resin from pine trees and use it to make salves and more!

Resin is a substance that oozes or exudes from pine trees, and some other plants, to help heal wounds or seal off insect damage. Depending on what time of year you forage, and the age of the resin, it may be soft and sticky, or it may be in hard chunks.

Pine resin has benefits for humans too! It’s antimicrobial and increases circulation, making it useful in products such as:

  • first aid salves for minor scrapes and nicks
  • drawing salves for splinters and boils
  • rubs for aches & pains
  • soap for various skin conditions
  • balms for chapped or dry skin

It has a fresh piney scent that smells pleasant to most people, dependent upon the type of tree you harvest it from. Some species of trees produce more resin than others.

Clumps of resin on a fallen Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) tree.

Types of Pine to Harvest Resin From

You can forage resin from all types of pines. Around our area, we mainly have eastern white pine (Pinus strobis), Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana), and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), so that’s what we use. Other pines to collect resin from include pinyon (Pinus edulis) and Ponderosa (Pinus ponderosa). The resin from spruce or some firs is also useful.

One evergreen you don’t want to accidentally confuse with pine is Yew (Taxus spp). Please read Green Deane’s article on Yew, over at Eat the Weeds to learn more about its toxicity.

The Arbor Day Foundation has an awesome interactive “What Tree Is This?” feature on their site. It should help you get started recognizing the types of pine that grow around you.

You can also check your local or state resources – they have tons of helpful information available! We found the Virginia Department of Forestry’s Common Native Trees of Virginia Guide (which you can freely download on their site) really helpful when starting to learn our trees.

This pine tree barely missed falling on our chicken coop during a winter storm! When we went to clean it up, we noticed the treasure trove of resin clumps all along one of the main trunk branches.

How to Sustainably Harvest Pine Resin

We strictly gather from trees that have fallen during storms – winter is a perfect time, since yearly snow and ice storms always bring down a few pine trees. Sometimes the tree will have a supply of resin from previous wounds, other times we cut the tree into smaller sections for moving it out of our yard, or from the chicken/goat area, and resin will ooze from those branch cuttings.

Harvesting resin from a storm-fallen white pine (Pinus strobis), which fell and crushed one of our plum trees. Resin oozed out where the branches were cut with a chain saw to make cleaning it up easier. (Don’t harvest from cuts like this, if a tree is still standing/living.)

If you must gather from living trees do so carefully. Remember that resin is like a bandage over a tree wound. Since it’s an important part of tree healing, you don’t want to just rip or dig it off of a living tree. It’s best to harvest the resin when chunks of it have fallen to the ground, or if you find some dripping further down the trunk, past the wounded area.

An old butter knife is perfect for popping off cold chunks, or scraping the softer bits from a fallen tree. Since the resin is sticky, collect it in a paper cup, piece of parchment paper, or a jar dedicated to resin collecting.

resin oozing from the top section of a young pine tree that was nicked off

When to Harvest

You can harvest pine resin year ’round. The colder weather of winter is an especially good time to forage for storm-fallen trees and branches. The resin is also hardened by cold temperatures, making it easier to collect.

Using Pine Resin in Salves, Soaps & More!

When it comes to pine resin, a pretty common problem occurs when someone tries to directly melt resin, then add it to a salve or soap. This is messy and can cause recipe complications. It works much better to infuse the resin into oil, strain out any tree bark and remaining debris, and then incorporate the resin infused oil into your recipe.

We’ll tell you exactly how to do that below!

First though, you’ll want to crush or break any bigger pine resin chunks into smaller pieces or powder if possible. This gives more surface area for the resin to more fully dissolve into the oil.

Crush frozen resin chunks into smaller pieces and powder, using freezer paper and a hammer.

How to Crush Pine Resin

You’ll need:

  • large chunks of resin
  • parchment paper or freezer paper
  • a freezer
  • a hammer

Place the chunks of resin on a sheet of parchment or freezer paper, and freeze them for several hours, until hardened. Fold the freezer/parchment paper around the pieces, then use a hammer to carefully break them up into smaller pieces or powder. (We always do this task outside on our porch, or sidewalk.)

Be aware that if you use a coffee grinder to grind up resins, or sticky-tending things like propolis, it will leave behind a sticky residue that’s difficult to clean out.

Using Pine Resin

Now that you’ve collected pine resin, it’s time to put it to use!

In this section, you’ll learn to make pine resin oil and three kinds of pine resin salve, plus how to incorporate the infused oil into other kinds of products, such as soap, too.

Two jars of freshly infused oil: The one on the left is made with ponderosa pine resin and a ratio of 1 part resin to 3 parts oil. The jar on the right is made with 1 part Virginia pine resin and 8 parts of oil. Both have a wonderful woodsy resinous scent!

Infused Oil

Pine resin infused oil can be used to make natural products such as salve, body butter, lotion, and soap!

To make the oil, you’ll need:
  • pine resin that has been crushed or powdered (see above for how)
  • oil of your choice (see more on that below)
  • a glass canning or mason jar, to use for infusing
  • small saucepan with several inches of water, to create a double boiler effect
  • a stainless steel or heatproof strainer
  • a little extra oil to use when cleaning up (coconut oil works really well for this)
Resin to Oil Ratio:

How much resin and oil you use, will depend on how much resin you’ve collected, and how strong you want your oil to be.

  • For most skincare applications, you can use roughly 3 to 4 times as much oil as crushed resin. So if you collect 1/4 cup of resin, then use about 3/4 cup to 1 cup of oil.
  • If you don’t have a lot of resin to work with, you can use a higher ratio instead – such as 1 part resin to 8 parts oil. An example would be 1 tablespoon resin to 1/2 cup of oil. (There are 8 tablespoons in 1/2 cup of oil.)
  • If using in soap, use 2 to 3 tablespoons resin for a pint jar of oil. (Which equates to about 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 cups of oil.)
Row of resins: Ponderosa pine (left), Eastern white pine (middle), and Virginia pine (right).
Types of Oil to Use:

Olive oil is a classic choice for salves and balms, and is usually used for soapmaking infusions. Sunflower oil is another good choice, especially for those prone to eczema or sensitive skin. However, both olive and sunflower are slower to absorb into your skin and may feel a bit greasy because of that trait.

To create a slightly faster absorbing product, try using rice bran oil, apricot kernel oil, safflower oil, or jojoba oil for your infusion instead.

Instructions to make the oil:
  1. Place the pine resin is a canning jar, or other heatproof container.
  2. Add the oil and stir a few times.
  3. Cover the jar loosely with a flat metal canning lid.
  4. Set the jar down into a saucepan filled with several inches of water.
  5. You want the water to come up the sides of the jar, but not so much that the jar floats.
  6. Place the pan over a medium-low burner and heat for 2 to 4 hours.
  7. Stir every so often, scraping along the bottom of the jar, to help keep the pine resin from settling in a single clump.
  8. Keep a close eye during infusing time and don’t let the water in the pan dry out.
  9. After the resin has had time to infuse into the oil, remove from heat and strain the oil through a fine mesh sieve into a jar, while it’s still hot.
  10. After straining, immediately wipe out the remaining debris/resin with an old rag or paper towel, then clean the strainer with hot water and dish soap, so the residue from the remaining resin doesn’t stick to it.
  11. The infused oil should have a shelf life of at least 12 months.
  12. You’ll eventually notice some sediment at the bottom of the infusing jar – that’s fine and normal. Just carefully pour out your oil when using for recipes, leaving the sediment behind in the jar.

Tip: If your original infusing jar still has a bunch of resin stuck to the bottom and you can’t clean it out, add more plain oil, cap the jar, and tuck it away in a warm place – like the top of your fridge, or a warm room – to infuse the slower way for a month or two.

Tin of pine salve on the resin-covered tree it’s made from.

Pine Resin Salve (3 recipes)

While basic pine salve is wonderful on its own, it can also be tweaked for specific purposes – such as making a balm for painful joints/arthritis, or a chest rub for coughs – simply by switching up the essential oils used.

You could also mix and match with herbal infused oils, such as using mullein or bee balm infused oil as a sub for part of the resin infused oil in the decongestant balm, or by adding cayenne and/or ginger to your infusion if making a sore muscle rub.

1. Basic Pine Resin Salve

This basic salve recipe is useful for general first aid purposes, such as minor scrapes and scratches, or on chapped, dry skin spots. It’s can also be helpful as a drawing salve, for when you have a stuck splinter, or a painful boil. (Apply and cover with a band-aid overnight.)

Ingredients for the basic salve:
  • 1.55 oz (44 g) pine resin infused oil
  • 0.25 oz (7 g) grated beeswax or pastilles
2. Decongestant Resin Balm

The phlegm moving properties of pine are enhanced with eucalyptus, peppermint, and white camphor essential oils, to help break up congestion and open up your sinuses. You may alternatively choose to use part resin infused oil and part bee balm or mullein oil. (Example: 1 oz resin oil + 0.6 oz bee balm oil.) If you don’t have white camphor essential oil, try using rosemary EO in its place. This balm is not intended for young children.

Ingredients for the decongestant balm:
  • 1. 55 oz (44 g) pine resin infused oil
  • 0.25 oz (7 g) grated beeswax or pastilles
  • 16 drops eucalyptus essential oil
  • 5 drops peppermint essential oil
  • 2 drops white camphor essential oil
3. Pine Resin Sore Muscle Rub

Pine resin helps increase circulation, relieving aches, pains, and tired muscles. Here it’s combined with cypress and clove essential oil, to help boost the warming pain relief effect. If you don’t have cypress EO, try using cedarwood Himalayan or juniper berry essential oil instead. This rub is helpful for achy joints and other muscle and joint issues that feel better when you apply heat (such as heating pad, hot water bottle, or warm bath) to them.

Ingredients for the sore muscle rub:
  • 1.55 oz (44 g) pine resin infused oil
  • 0.25 oz (7 g) grated beeswax or pastilles
  • 24 drops cypress essential oil (or juniper berry, or cedarwood Himalayan)
  • 1 drop clove essential oil
Directions to make the salve, balm, and rub:
  1. Weigh the infused oil into a heatproof container, such as a half-pint canning jar.
  2. Weigh the beeswax and add it to the jar.
  3. Place the jar down into a small saucepan filled with several inches of water, forming a makeshift double boiler.
  4. Place the pan over medium to medium-low heat.
  5. Heat until the wax melts, then remove the pan from the burner.
  6. Add the desired drops of essential oils to the melted beeswax and oil mixture.
  7. Pour into a two ounce tin or glass jar.
  8. Label and store your salve/balm/rub out of direct heat and light.
  9. Shelf life of salves, balms, and rubs is usually at least one year, or as long as the product smells good.
bar of homemade cold process soap surrounded by fresh pine needles and pine cones

Pine Resin Soap

You can also use your infused oil to make soap! If you’re making cold process soap, it’s suggested to have a more diluted oil (such as a ratio of 2 to 3 tbsp crushed resin per pint jar of oil.) Resin will speed up the soapmaking process and a high amount can cause your soap to seize up.

We have a whole tutorial with two recipe variations (one with tallow or lard, or one with vegan butters) over at our sister site, The Nerdy Farm Wife:

How to Make Pine Resin Soap {+2 recipes}

You can collect your own pine resin and use it to create salves, soap, balms, rubs, and more!

More Uses for Pine Resin Infused Oil

Try using your infused oil to make body butter, creams, or other products for your skin!

Simply replace plain oil in a skin care recipe, with part or all infused oil in its place. For example – if your favorite body butter recipe calls for 2 ounces of oil, you may wish to use 1 ounce plain oil + 1 ounce pine resin infused oil, to create your own pine resin body butter.

Pine resin can also be used to make homemade beeswax wraps (a tutorial that will eventually make its way to this site), and can be chewed as a natural chewing gum. It’s an acquired taste… and some pines, such as ponderosa, should be avoided internally during pregnancy, but it’s fun to try old-fashioned resin gum at least once in your life!

Our articles are for information and idea-sharing only. While we aim for 100% accuracy, it is solely up to the reader to provide proper identification. Be sure to seek out local foraging classes and plant walks, and invest in mushroom and foraging guides suitable for the area you live in, since some wild foods are poisonous, or may have adverse effect.

  • a half pint canning jar, for infusing

  • a flat metal canning lid, to cover the infusing jar

  • small saucepan with several inches of water, to create a double boiler effect

  • a stainless steel or heatproof strainer

  • a half pint canning jar, for making the salve

  • a 2 ounce tin or jar, to store your salve

For the Infused Oil
  • 1+ TBSP crushed pine resin
  • 1/4+ cup oil of your choice
For the Basic Salve
  • 1.55 oz pine resin infused oil
  • 0.25 oz grated beeswax or pastilles
For the Decongestant Balm
  • 1. 55 oz pine resin infused oil (can use half of this as mullein or bee balm infused oil instead)
  • 0.25 oz grated beeswax or pastilles
  • Essential Oil: 16 drops eucalyptus, 5 drops peppermint, 2 drops white camphor (or rosemary)
For the Sore Muscle Rub
  • 1.55 oz pine resin infused oil (can add a pinch of ground cayenne and/or ginger to the infusion, if you'd like a boosted effect)
  • 0.25 oz grated beeswax or pastilles
  • Essential Oil: 24 drops cypress (or juniper berry, or cedarwood Himalayan), 1 drop clove
To Make the Infused Oil
  • Place the pine resin is a canning jar, or other heatproof container.

  • Add the oil and stir a few times.

  • Cover the jar loosely with a flat metal canning lid.

  • Set the jar down into a saucepan filled with several inches of water.

  • You want the water to come up the sides of the jar, but not so much that the jar floats.

  • Place the pan over a medium-low burner and heat for 2 to 4 hours.

  • Stir every so often, scraping along the bottom of the jar, to help keep the pine resin from settling in a single clump.

  • Keep a close eye during infusing time and don’t let the water in the pan dry out.

  • After the resin has had time to infuse into the oil, remove from heat and strain the oil through a fine mesh sieve into a jar, while it’s still hot.

To Make the Basic Salve, Decongestant Balm, and Sore Muscle Rub
  • Weigh the infused oil into a heatproof container, such as a half-pint canning jar.

  • Weigh the beeswax and add it to the jar.

  • Place the jar down into a small saucepan filled with several inches of water, forming a makeshift double boiler.

  • Place the pan over medium to medium-low heat.

  • Heat until the wax melts, then remove the pan from the burner.

  • Add the desired drops of essential oils to the melted beeswax and oil mixture.

  • Pour into a two ounce tin or glass jar.

Resin to Oil Ratio for the Infused Oil: How much resin and oil you use, will depend on how much resin you’ve collected, and how strong you want your oil to be. For most skincare applications, you can use roughly 3 to 4 times as much oil as crushed resin. That would equate to 1 tablespoon resin for about 1/4 cup of oil. (If you don’t have enough resin, use a higher ratio, such as 1/2 tablespoon resin for 1/4 cup of oil.)

Our articles are for information and idea-sharing only. While we aim for 100% accuracy, it is solely up to the reader to provide proper identification. Be sure to seek out local foraging classes and plant walks, and invest in mushroom and foraging guides suitable for the area you live in, since some wild foods are poisonous, or may have adverse effect.

Post Tags: #pine

Resins 🥝 how to dissolve, how to get rid of, how to clean

  • Why remove resin?
  • What you need to know about resin?
  • How to remove resin from a board?
  • Other methods and means
  • Safe recipes
  • When the walls are already sheathed
  • Footage

The interior made of natural wood looks very solid, presentable, soft and pleasant. Coniferous material is especially valuable, which even during operation contributes to the natural healing of all residents of the house. But there is one problem that arises when laying softwood - how to get rid of resin on the boards, which must be solved correctly. How to remove resin from a tree in a pine bath or steam room? That is what this article will be about.

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Why remove the resin?

Coniferous wood species such as pine, spruce, larch are unusually beautiful, but they emit natural resins not only after sawing, but also during growth. This resin is a very viscous, fluid substance, so the process of interior decoration is much more complicated, because:

  1. Boards in places where the resin flows out become extremely sticky and quickly adhere to any tools and materials that they come into contact with.
  2. Gum bleeds usually appear a little darker than the entire board, so a uniform finish cannot be achieved.
  3. Staining with a leaking substance is impossible, and unprofitable. Paint or varnish will not harden on resin stains, respectively - there will remain convex, unprotected from the harmful effects of moisture, areas of the coating that stand out by their color.

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What do you need to know about resin?

Resin removal is best done only after the board has been sanded. Although compliance with this rule will not be a guarantee that the "resin" will not prove itself again. Sometimes such a substance begins to ooze under the influence of certain factors after the finishing work is completed. This factor must be taken into account before giving preference to coniferous decoration of the house.

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How to remove resin from a board?

In order to correctly prepare all the elements for laying the floor, wall sheathing or ceiling, it is necessary to correctly get rid of the resin on the boards. This can be done in several ways.

Mechanical removal

In this case, in order to remove the resin from the boards, it is necessary to wait for the complete solidification of the fluid mass. Then, armed with a knife, remove each piece by hand.

Important! After removing all unwanted sagging, it is necessary to sand the surface of the wood with sandpaper or a special tool.

Solvents

You can also use household chemicals to dissolve the resin. The following agents are suitable for this purpose:

  • alcohol;
  • white spirit;
  • turpentine;
  • refined gasoline;
  • acetone;
  • nitro thinner.

Important! The use of any of these solvents does not affect the structure and shade of softwood. But when using it, it is advisable to protect yourself with gloves, a respirator so that caustic volatile vapors do not provoke irritation of the skin and mucous membranes.

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Other ways and means

You can also get rid of resin on the boards with the help of folk methods, which consist in the use of available kitchen and pharmacy solutions, powders.

The following methods effectively help to solve the problem:

  • Ammonium chloride or ammonia solution. Such a tool is diluted with acetone in a ratio of 2: 1. Apply to the surface with rubbing movements until foam is formed. Remains of foam and resin are removed after 20 minutes with a clean, damp cloth.
  • Potash and soda in equal proportions (50 g each). Both substances are mixed and poured into 1 liter of hot water. To enhance the effect, you can add 250 ml of acetone.
  • Caustic soda. It is dissolved in half a liter of cold water. You can also add 250 ml of a solvent such as acetone.

Important! Any of these products can only be applied to a sanded, but not painted surface. Otherwise, acetone will dissolve the paint and the finished finish will not look the most attractive way.

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Safe recipes

In order not to damage the wood either mechanically or chemically, or in case of a small amount of resin, use the following products to get rid of the resin on the boards:

  • 25 g of wood or any liquid soap mixed with 50 ml of ammonia and 1 liter of hot water;
  • acetic solution of concentrated acid and water in a ratio of 1:50.

Important! The last resort is also well suited to remove alkali residues after using any other substance or solution to get rid of the resin on the boards. It helps a lot, including when you wash ready-made walls and you need to remove the remnants of the cleaner from the joints of the crowns.

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When the walls are already sheathed

If the resin began to appear from the boards after they were laid on the walls, it is unlikely that you will have the desire to spend a lot of time pointwise removing each piece of “resin” with solvents or a knife.

In this case, you can burn through all the places of formation of coniferous tree sap with a blowtorch, then clean them with sandpaper of a suitable grit.

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Video

When choosing a softwood board, remember that you will not be able to completely get rid of the resin on the boards. It can appear at any, the most unexpected moment for you. But this is actually not such a global problem, because it is possible to remove the “sap”, and the beauty, environmental friendliness and benefits of such wood cannot be compared with any modern plastic or other material. Let your home be filled with only the pleasant aroma of pine needles and always look cozy. And with minor resin problems, you now know how to deal with it.

How to remove pine resin from hair and objects?

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Content:

  1. Anti-tar in hair
  2. How to wash off resin?
  3. Other tar control methods
  4. How to remove tar from a car?
  5. Car tar control

Sometimes, while walking through a coniferous forest, you can find a viscous resin on your body. This situation is especially not encouraging when it is found in the hair. If you do not know how to get rid of it, then this can become a huge problem. Do not cut the affected area. To neutralize this sticky substance, there are several effective and simple ways.

Anti-tar in the hair

This trouble can be dealt with effectively and quickly with the help of improvised means. To do this, we need:

  • shampoo;
  • soda;
  • vegetable oil;
  • acetone;
  • nail polish remover;
  • gasoline or thinner;
  • alcohol;
  • fine-tooth comb.

Depending on the condition, your hair type and the amount of sticky mixture you may also need:

  • cellophane film;
  • pipette;
  • hair dryer with comb attachment;
  • cotton pads.

How to wash off resin?

First of all, it is necessary to separate the strands stained with resin from clean hair. Cellophane film will help us with this:

  1. Separate the hair with resin.
  2. Lay these strands on cellophane.
  3. You can start cleaning your hair.

Option 1

Solvents such as nail polish remover, acetone or alcohol remove gum from coniferous trees. Step-by-step instructions will help to cope with the problem:

  1. We apply any selected agent on a cotton pad.
  2. If possible, without touching the hair, wipe the resin.
  3. We place the cleaned strands under the cellophane.
  4. Wipe until the sticky mass is completely gone.

The process will go much faster if you have someone to help you. These products can cause irritation, so try not to come into contact with the scalp.

Option 2

If there is a lot of resin and it has already hardened, use gasoline or thinner. These funds are used as follows:

  1. Pipette a few drops onto contaminated areas.
  2. Avoid contact of thinner or gasoline with skin and hair.
  3. Wash your hair several times with shampoo.

Other ways to deal with tar

There are less extreme ways to get rid of tar.

Method 1

Fine hair can be easily cleaned with a comb and vegetable oil. This method is safe. For this you need:

  1. Take vegetable oil and soak your hair with resin.
  2. Comb your hair with a fine-toothed comb.
  3. Wash your hair with plain shampoo.

This option is not suitable for coarse and thick hair.

Method 2

There is another effective and proven method to solve the problem. It is highly effective, and your hair will quickly restore its attractiveness. We perform the following steps:

  1. Take 400 ml of hot water and dissolve 2 tbsp. spoons of soda.
  2. Wash the contaminated strands in this solution several times.
  3. We wash the hair with shampoo after the traces of the sticky mass have completely disappeared.

Method 3

Resin is quickly removed on cooling. It is necessary to perform the following actions:

  1. Take ice.
  2. We cover the soiled area with ice and wait for some time until the viscous mass hardens.
  3. Frozen resin remains to be crushed and removed.
  4. Wash hair with shampoo in warm water.

Method 4

In this case we need a hair dryer with teeth. It is necessary to do the following:

  1. We heat the contaminated strands with a hair dryer.
  2. Wipe the softened sticky mass with a dry cloth.
  3. When most of the resin is thus removed, without turning off the hair dryer, comb the hair strands with the nozzle.
  4. From time to time we clean the nozzle of the hair dryer.

All sticky hair can be completely removed in this way. You may not even have to wash your hair.

How to remove tar from a car?

In hot weather, after a car ride, you can find resin from coniferous trees on your vehicle. Naturally, you are unlikely to be able to remove such pollution with ordinary water. There are some simple solutions to clean your car quickly. Effective agents in the fight against tar are:

  • stain remover;
  • gasoline;
  • peanut butter;
  • Sprite drink.

Vehicle tar control

Check which of the above products you have available. Familiarize yourself with the proposed methods and choose for yourself the one that you consider the simplest, most convenient and effective.

Method 1

Sprite is often used to control a variety of contaminants. In our case, it will help soften the resin well. You should not have any problems with the purchase of this drink. We perform the following manipulations:

  1. Fill sticky spots with soda and wait for a while until the substance begins to act.
  2. Remove the remaining dirt with a soft cloth.
  3. Wipe the operation site with a damp cloth, and then wipe everything dry.

This method is suitable for fresh stains. If the resin from coniferous trees has had time to harden, then Sprite will no longer be effective. To do this, you need to choose another way to deal with the resin.

Method 2

Gasoline and peanut butter have shown excellent results in the fight against pine velcro. It is necessary to act according to the following scheme:

  1. Apply the selected agent to the contaminated area and leave it for 10-15 minutes.
  2. Remove resin elements with a cotton cloth.

Method 3

If the resin has been on the car for a long time, then we need a special stain remover for cars.


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