How to grow tree ferns in pots


Tree Fern Growing Guide - How To Grow, Plant & Maintain

Tree ferns are some of the most elegant and beautiful plants for your unique property development needs. In most cases, these ferns tend to have a tree-like design which comprises of a thick and large trunk with spreading lance-shaped fronds at the top section.

Some trees are known to reach as high as 6ft, and some of the popular types are the Cyathea and Dicksonia. Both of these trees both grow slowly, and they also have distinctive trunk shape growing at an average of 1-2 inches every year.

Key Facts

Common name Tree Fern
Latin name Dicksonia and Cyathea
Flowering time -
Planting time Spring to autumn
Height and spread Up to 5-6m in height and up to a 5m spread
Aspect Sheltered
Hardiness Moderate
Can be potted?Yes

These types of trees thrive in shady and damp conditions, which is where they are mostly found in their natural environment. More so, these trees also grow in the woodlands whereby the soil humus is potent, and it retains sufficient moisture.

One of the most amazing factors about this type of plant is that it can be purchased as what seems like a lifeless log, but after some time, a tree grows which is full of life. These trees tend to also thrive under tree canopies in areas such as woodlands and forests, where the soil is rich in humus.

How to plant tree ferns

In most cases, the tree ferns are mostly bought as logs. All you need to do is to plant the log in a sheltered location which is rich in humus and to levels of as much as 10cm deep. While this might not be a caveat, it will go a long way to ensure the log is stable until the tree grows. Once the tree is planted, you might only need to engage in the watering procedure and no other significant farming procedure.

You want to ensure that sufficient water reaches into the crown and and that you also provide the log with sufficient amount of water as well. This procedure has to be conducted as regularly as possible, preferably daily until the tree achieves the appropriate growth goals. During winter, you might also want to maintain the tree in damp soil conditions in relation to what you deem suitable.

Once the tree grows, ensure that it has sufficient water such that it does not become dry.If you plan to plant in a pot or a container, then the tree is best planted in a mixture of compost.

Tree fern winter care

While these trees tend to be frost hardy down to as much as – 10 degrees Celsius, they can only take this type of temperature for so long. For this reason, ensure that you provide your trees with sufficient protection, especially at the crown of the plant and the location where the fronds emerge from each spring as well.
Using a garden fleece, wrap the entire trunk in several layers and always avoid polyethylene.

Following this, place a ball of straw into the central section of the crown, especially where the fronds are found for added protection.

You should then pull the fronds in cohesion and tie them with a robust string. A good recommendation for you would be to add a layer of leaf mound around the base of the trunk for added protection and nutrient delivery.

Protecting pot grown tree ferns in winter

Pot grown plants are easy to move into a sheltered location, and you are recommended to ensure the pot is wrapped in a bubble for optimal protection. These trees can also be position in a greenhouse during the winter or transferred into a conservatory to avoid direct sunlight. At times, the snow falls heavy, and this means that plants often find it challenging to naturally acquire the basic needs for growth and development.

For this reason, you want to protect the plants growing outdoors to avoid causing damage to the fronds. A good recommendation would be to place some straw on the crown and fold the fronds as well. More so, you might also consider the container grown plants, which should be placed in a location with sufficient shelter and with the container bubble wrapped.

Apply this technique also during late October, but ensure that you remove them during spring, especially before the fronds start growing. You might need a significant amount wrapping before you achieve a much more exposed garden.

How to care for tree ferns

One of the main benefits of these trees is that they are simple to care for, and will only require some level of informed decision making. This is especially true during the winter time of the year whereby regular watering is required as the old dead fronds are replaced with lively ones.

A good recommendation would be to cut back to around an average of 20cm from the trunk, to ensure that you cut to the appropriate level. You can also use the old fronds from the main trunk as they grow since this is important for maintaining health.

Feeding

For the first few months, it is recommended that you proceed with caution when it comes to applying nutrients and supplements for the unique needs of your plant. This is mainly because any mediocre planting techniques might compromise the growth and development of fern tree.

During the second year of development, you can easily use supplements such as the multi-purpose liquid feed, especially during the growing season. During the spring season, you may also add granules around of the base of the trunk, and this will play an important role in encouraging the development of new fronds. A significant portion of gardeners have experienced notable success when it comes to supplementing fern trees, and you should consider this as well.

Tree fern complications

Broadly speaking, these trees tend to grow without any complications. With that being said, one main complication would be when the fronds fail to grow appropriately, and the trunk decreases in size. This is mainly caused due to a lack of water and optimal ecosystem conditions. In this case, ensure that the tree the appropriate basic needs for optimal development.

Container Cultivation

Tree ferns can be grown in containers, and outdoors or in large conservatories or greenhouses that have sufficient light. In addition to this, the location has to have filtered light and adequate humidity, along with using loam based ericaceous compost as well. You may also consider adding as much as 20 percent of the peat free potting elements for optimal humus.

Following this, you should also apply a unique plant supplement to ensure that the plant grows appropriately. The supplement can be applied as much as once a week during the growing season or by adding a controlled release supplement at the base of the plant.

Propagation

With the appropriate health and development conditions, these particular plants can be propagated from the spores that occur on the underside sections of the leaves. Having said that, cold temperatures or challenging living conditions may compromise the development of spores.

Therefore, the simplest technique to propagate the tree ferns would be to use the offsets. Simply put, these are the young plants that grow the trunk and the roots. More so, the offsets develop gradually, so you might consider leaving them to mature until they can be easy to handle. Following this, consider the following steps:

Sever the offsets cleanly from the parent roots or trunks

Put them in a container with loam-based ericaceous compost, which is deep enough for the trees to sit in
Water the trees and place them in a container with a propagator with an average temperature of 16-20 degrees celsius
Once the novel growth development is seen, you can then consider introducing them to the rugged outdoors
A fern that is provided with the appropriate living conditions grows fast and might achieve outstanding heights over a few years.

An excellent example would be the trunk of the Australian tree fern, which often starts as a low and broad clip which will grow to sizes of as much as 6 feet. This often occurs in as little as one year, and the tree grows upward into a singular and small truck that is festooned with ginger finger like projections.

Additionally, the fronds are wide, and the bright green triangular leaves and foliage will spread to as much as 15 feet. The leaves won’t change in color during the fall season and the tree also does not have any fruits or flowers.

Growing Conditions

Classified as a tropical plant, the tree fern is highly adaptable to a host of unique growing climates, and it also thrives due to its perennial properties. In fact, according to the U.S Department of Agriculture rates its hardiness levels at 8 to 11, and it can thrive at temperatures that range in between 65 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

More so, the ferns can also grow in various types of soil conditions including sandy, clay, and loam, but the most preferable are growing in rich and moist soil with humus. While the tree ferns love the shade in general, they also tend to survive well in conditions with medium shade to locations that have full sun.

It is also important to note that the tree fern is not entirely resistant to drought and you may have to consider regular watering. With sufficient amounts of moisture and the appropriate growing conditions, you tree fern can reduce its expected growth span by as much as half. This is because these plants tend to be tolerant of various living conditions which make them a highly preferred plant species.

One important factor is that a healthy tree fern will require sufficient humidity and supplements. At the same time, the tree should also be kept away from excessive sunlight and winter conditions. Similar to all plants in the ecosystem today, they require specific living conditions to achieve the best growth results.

Where to plant tree ferns

Tree ferns tend to thrive in damp soil or full or partial shade. Therefore, a good recommendation for you would be to consider a sheltered location to achieve the best results. With that being said, these trees will grow well in the full sun, but will also require additional water to maintain optimal growth and development results.

Propagation

Just as previously mentioned, propagation is best done through the spores. For this reason, it’s a procedure that is best left to professional growers.

Repotting

A good recommendation for you would be to repot the plant annually into larger pots with fresh and free draining potting soil. When the plant achieves the ideal size that is available in the growing space, then you should consider stopping the repotting to control the growth. In the final instance, the tree will most likely outgrow both the pot and the room as well.

Varieties

There are various types of tree ferns. For instance, one of the most common is the one sold as the Australian tree fern and is usually classified as a Cyathea Cooperi. Having said that, there are well over 1,000 types of tree ferns, which are all found in the subtropical and tropical conditions. The Tasmanian and the New Zealand species tend to be affiliated with the Dicksonia Antarctica. Furthermore, this plant tends to have a narrower as when compared to the Australian tree fern, but with almost similar growing conditions.

Tips
  • Consider the growing the tree fern in dense or partial shade with sufficient room for the frond growth
  • Plant the trees in humus rich soil and add some lead mold during the planting season in the soil
  • Provide sufficient winter protection during mild winters and the appropriate basic needs
  • Ensure the tree is watered every day for optimal growth and development.
  • Water daily for six months, once planted and kept the plant moist after that. Never allow to dry out
  • Ensure the tree has sufficient nutrients and the correct application of fertilizer and supplements
  • Never grow the tree in salty or dry conditions since this might compromise growth

Tree Ferns - Tree Fern Hints and Tips

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Tree Fern Hints and Tips

Tree ferns are amazing plants that create a wide canopy of verdant green fronds. They are native to Australia and Tasmania and grow happily in our climate at the rate of roughly 1 inch per year as long as they have some winter fleece protection. Our tree ferns are a variety called Dicksonia antarctica (Soft Tree Fern) which is the most popular and easy to grow out of all tree ferns.

 

IMPORTANT: If you have just bought your tree fern and there are still risk of frosts, you will need to fleece it straight away.

 

Where should I grow my Tree Fern?

Tree ferns are happiest growing in shade, but they can grow in sun as long as they are very well watered. They dislike exposed or windy positions.

 

Winter protection

Your tree fern will need protecting in winter in all but the mildest areas of the UK. It is most important to protect the top of the trunk where the fronds emerge until the last frosts (usually around late April) – it cannot be allowed to freeze. In the winter the fronds will die down but do not cut them off until the following spring. Fold the fronds in before wrapping up your tree fern for winter. Pack the top of the crown with straw and then wrap round well with horticultural fleece.

 

How do I plant it?

Tree Ferns can be planted in a pot or in the ground. The bottom part of the trunk needs to be buried enough so that the tree fern is stable. Apart from the very small sizes which are pretty sturdy, it is a good idea to stake your tree fern to hold it firmly.

 

Can I plant it in a pot?

Tree ferns will live happily for years in pots. This is often a good idea for smaller sizes (which tend to be a bit more tender than larger sizes) as you can move the whole pot into a greenhouse or shed during the winter. Don’t let the pot dry out – it is a good idea to stand it in a tray of water every now and again.

 

What type of soil should I use?

Tree Ferns like slightly acidic, humus-rich soil. We recommend using a mixture of 50% ericaceous compost, 25% leaf mould and 25% general purpose compost (preferable peat-free). Leaf mould is just leaves that have rotted down – you can buy it or go foraging under trees!

 

How much watering and feeding does it need?

Tree ferns need a lot of water and It is vital to water your tree fern regularly, particularly in the first 6 months while it is getting established. Water into the top of the crown and the base regularly and also spray the trunk with water. The trunk is made up of aerial roots and they will appreciate a drink too. (If your tree fern isn’t getting enough water in the growing season, you may find that the fronds reduce in size over the years).

Feed your tree fern with Tree Fern Feed regularly during the growing season (we sell this). Follow the instructions and water the feed into the crown of the plant.

 

 

 

 

 

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8 tree ferns that can be grown in pots or in the garden

Image - Wikimedia / Hedwig Storch

tree ferns This is one of the most amazing plants in the world: their trunk is more or less thin, but their leaves can easily exceed two meters in length. From afar, they look like palm trees, but do not confuse them - there is nothing in common between them (palms are angiosperms, and ferns are gymnosperms).

These plants are also much older; in addition, fossils dating back about 420 million years have been found. They don't produce flowers, but that doesn't stop them from being one of the most beloved plants in gardens, patios, and terraces.

  • 2.8 Fibrous dixonia
  • 3 How to grow a tree fern?
  • 4 Where can I buy tree fern?
  • What are ferns?

    Fern is a gymnosperm plant characterized by large fronds (leaves), usually pinnate, usually greenish in color . They may or may not have a stem that serves as a stem, formed by the rhizome of the roots. They reproduce by spores that form in sporophils and they are found on the underside of the pinna and look like this:

    Do you see those little reddish dots? They are called sporophylls, from which spores arise.

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    Where do they live?

    Ferns they live in shady and humid regions of the world. However, the vast majority of tree ferns only grow in temperate or warm (including tropical) climates.

    Types of tree ferns for cottages or pots

    Blechnum gibbum

    Image - Wikimedia / Krzysztof Ziarnek, Kenraiz

    Known as the pale or robust fern, this fern native to New Caledonia is characterized by a very dense crown of green leaves 3-4 meters long. The trunk is short, up to 1 meter high. about 20 centimeters thick.

    It is fairly easy to grow: it needs fertile, moist soil (don't let it dry out completely in summer), and as if that weren't enough, it can handle both light frosts (down to -3ºC) and high temperatures (38ºC).

    Cyathea australis

    Image - Flickr / Poet Pete

    Known as the rough tree fern, this plant is native to southeast Queensland, New South Wales and southern Victoria in Australia. Can reach 12 meters in height. , rarely 20 meters, with a trunk thickness of about 30 cm. The leaves are long, 4 to 6 meters long, the upper surface is dark green and the underside is pale green.

    It is grown both in gardens and in pots, in fertile and well-drained soils. The frequency of watering should be high, as it does not withstand drought. On the other hand, it tolerates light frosts down to -3 ° C, if they are punctual and short.

    Cyathea arborescens

    Image - Wikimedia / Xemenendura

    Known as the giant fern or shrimp stick, this is a fern native to the Antilles. can reach 9 meters in height , with a thin stem 7 to 13 cm thick. The leaves reach a length of up to 4 meters, green.

    Due to its origin it is cultivated under delicate conditions. They live outdoors only in a humid tropical climate, without frost. It can also be stored indoors, such as on a patio protected from the sun. Requires very frequent watering.

    Cyathea Cooperi

    Image - Wikimedia / Amanda Coffin

    Known as Queensland Tree Fern, Australian Tree Fern, Lace Tree Fern, Scaly Tree Fern or Cooper Tree Fern, this is a native Australian plant. Grows up to 15 meters in height. , with a barrel thickness up to 30cm. Its leaves are green, 4-6 meters long.

    It can be grown in partial shade in fertile gardens or in large pots in temperate climates. Resistant to frost down to -4 °C if short and short term. Keep in mind that at these temperatures it may lose its foliage, but it recovers well in spring. High temperatures (30, 35 or even 38ºC) will not affect you if you have damp soil.

    Cyathea dialbata

    Image - Wikimedia / CT Johansson

    Known as silver fern, silver fern, kaponga or pong, this plant is endemic to New Zealand. May exceed 10 meters in height. , with a dense crown consisting of leaves 4 meters long, on the underside of white or silver. Its trunk does not exceed 30 centimeters.

    The care he needs is similar to that of his sister. C. Cooperi : Fertile soil or substrate, frequent watering and in a temperate climate. Resistant to light frosts down to -2ºС, although it prefers not to fall below 0º.

    Cyathea medullary

    This tree, known as the black fern, is endemic to New Zealand. Reaches a height of 6-7 meters. , with a completely black trunk, the thickness of which does not exceed 35 cm. Its leaves or leaves reach 5 meters in length.

    This is a relatively easy plant to grow and requires a warm temperate climate, frequent watering and soil rich in organic matter.

    Dixonia Antarctica (currently Balantium antarctica )

    image - Flickr / Jungle Garden

    Known as Dixonia, this is a fern native to Australia, particularly New South Wales, Tasmania and Victoria. Can reach 15 meters in height. , although they usually do not exceed 5 meters. Its trunk thickens by about 30 cm and is crowned with very long leaves from 4 to 6 meters.

    It can usually be found in temperate gardens, with a mild climate (up to 30 ° C maximum) and humid. Requires soil rich in organic matter and frequent watering. Its cultivation in the Mediterranean is not recommended due to its low resistance to extreme temperatures (minimum 35-38°C). Otherwise, it is resistant to frost down to -5ºС.

    Fibrous Dixonia

    Image - Wikimedia / CT Johansson

    Known as the golden fern, this is a fern native to New Zealand. reaches 6 meters in height , with a trunk thickness of 30cm. The fronds or leaves are 3 to 4 meters long, so this is undoubtedly one of the smallest tree ferns.

    Its cultivation consists in cultivation in fertile, well-drained and moist soils. Irrigation should be frequent. Withstands light and occasional frosts down to -2ºС.

    Article subject:

    Cyathea tomentosissima, a tree fern that won't leave you indifferent

    How to grow a tree fern?

    Tree ferns are plants which, although there are many different species, require more or less the same care. This means that if you buy for example Blechnum and then get Cyathea, I am almost 100% sure that both of them will be valuable if you take care of them like this:

    • Ubicación :
      • Outdoor: Place it in a bright place, but out of direct sunlight. It is best to place it in the shade of a large tree with a wide crown or under a shading net.
      • Interior: the room should be bright, without drafts.
    • irrigation : often, especially in summer. You should keep the soil moist, except during the winter, or if you have it indoors, when it's best to let it dry out a bit. If possible, use lime-free water and do not wet the leaves.
    • follower : in spring and summer with organic fertilizers such as guano (available here).
    • Pickup or transfer time : in spring when the minimum temperature rises above 15ºC.
    • Plagues and diseases : they are very persistent. But you have to control the risks, and if the environment is very dry and hot, mealybugs.
    • multiplication : in spring spores to be stored in the seed bed near a heat source.

    Where to buy tree fern?

    These plants are usually sold in nurseries, but from my own experience I recommend that you search the Internet for nurseries or online stores that are manufacturers and specialize in selling .

    Be very careful when purchasing large specimens as they may have been illegally stolen from their respective habitats. To be on the safe side, always look for small specimens, without a stem, as this way you will be sure that these seedlings were obtained by spores.

    We are done with this. Which of the tree ferns you saw did you like best?


    8 tree ferns that can be grown in pots or in the garden

    Image - Wikimedia / Hedwig Storch exceed two meters in length. From afar, they look like palm trees, but do not confuse them - there is nothing in common between them (palms are angiosperms, and ferns are gymnosperms).

    These plants are also much older; in addition, fossils dating back about 420 million years have been found. They don't produce flowers, but that doesn't stop them from being one of the most beloved plants in gardens, patios, and terraces.

  • 2.8 Fibrous dixonia
  • 3 How to grow a tree fern?
  • 4 Where can I buy tree fern?
  • What are ferns?

    Fern is a gymnosperm plant characterized by large fronds (leaves), usually pinnate, usually greenish in color . They may or may not have a stem that serves as a stem, formed by the rhizome of the roots. They reproduce by spores that form in sporophils and they are found on the underside of the pinna and look like this:

    Do you see those little reddish dots? They are called sporophylls, from which spores arise.

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    Where do they live?

    Ferns they live in shady and humid regions of the world. However, the vast majority of tree ferns only grow in temperate or warm (including tropical) climates.

    Types of tree ferns for cottages or pots

    Blechnum gibbum

    Image - Wikimedia / Krzysztof Ziarnek, Kenraiz

    Known as the pale or robust fern, this fern native to New Caledonia is characterized by a very dense crown of green leaves 3-4 meters long. The trunk is short, up to 1 meter high. about 20 centimeters thick.

    It is fairly easy to grow: it needs fertile, moist soil (don't let it dry out completely in summer), and as if that weren't enough, it can handle both light frosts (down to -3ºC) and high temperatures (38ºC).

    Cyathea australis

    Image - Flickr / Poet Pete

    Known as the rough tree fern, this plant is native to southeast Queensland, New South Wales and southern Victoria in Australia. Can reach 12 meters in height. , rarely 20 meters, with a trunk thickness of about 30 cm. The leaves are long, 4 to 6 meters long, the upper surface is dark green and the underside is pale green.

    It is grown both in gardens and in pots, in fertile and well-drained soils. The frequency of watering should be high, as it does not withstand drought. On the other hand, it tolerates light frosts down to -3 ° C, if they are punctual and short.

    Cyathea arborescens

    Image - Wikimedia / Xemenendura

    Known as the giant fern or shrimp stick, this is a fern native to the Antilles. can reach 9 meters in height , with a thin stem 7 to 13 cm thick. The leaves reach a length of up to 4 meters, green.

    Due to its origin it is cultivated under delicate conditions. They live outdoors only in a humid tropical climate, without frost. It can also be stored indoors, such as on a patio protected from the sun. Requires very frequent watering.

    Cyathea Cooperi

    Image - Wikimedia / Amanda Coffin

    Known as Queensland Tree Fern, Australian Tree Fern, Lace Tree Fern, Scaly Tree Fern or Cooper Tree Fern, this is a native Australian plant. Grows up to 15 meters in height. , with a barrel thickness up to 30cm. Its leaves are green, 4-6 meters long.

    It can be grown in partial shade in fertile gardens or in large pots in temperate climates. Resistant to frost down to -4 °C if short and short term. Keep in mind that at these temperatures it may lose its foliage, but it recovers well in spring. High temperatures (30, 35 or even 38ºC) will not affect you if you have damp soil.

    Cyathea dialbata

    Image - Wikimedia / CT Johansson

    Known as silver fern, silver fern, kaponga or pong, this plant is endemic to New Zealand. May exceed 10 meters in height. , with a dense crown consisting of leaves 4 meters long, on the underside of white or silver. Its trunk does not exceed 30 centimeters.

    The care he needs is similar to that of his sister. C. Cooperi : Fertile soil or substrate, frequent watering and in a temperate climate. Resistant to light frosts down to -2ºС, although it prefers not to fall below 0º.

    Cyathea medullary

    This tree, known as the black fern, is endemic to New Zealand. Reaches a height of 6-7 meters. , with a completely black trunk, the thickness of which does not exceed 35 cm. Its leaves or leaves reach 5 meters in length.

    This is a relatively easy plant to grow and requires a warm temperate climate, frequent watering and soil rich in organic matter.

    Dixonia Antarctica (currently Balantium antarctica )

    image - Flickr / Jungle Garden

    Known as Dixonia, this is a fern native to Australia, particularly New South Wales, Tasmania and Victoria. Can reach 15 meters in height. , although they usually do not exceed 5 meters. Its trunk thickens by about 30 cm and is crowned with very long leaves from 4 to 6 meters.

    It can usually be found in temperate gardens, with a mild climate (up to 30 ° C maximum) and humid. Requires soil rich in organic matter and frequent watering. Its cultivation in the Mediterranean is not recommended due to its low resistance to extreme temperatures (minimum 35-38°C). Otherwise, it is resistant to frost down to -5ºС.

    Fibrous Dixonia

    Image - Wikimedia / CT Johansson

    Known as the golden fern, this is a fern native to New Zealand. reaches 6 meters in height , with a trunk thickness of 30cm. The fronds or leaves are 3 to 4 meters long, so this is undoubtedly one of the smallest tree ferns.

    Its cultivation consists in cultivation in fertile, well-drained and moist soils. Irrigation should be frequent. Withstands light and occasional frosts down to -2ºС.

    Article subject:

    Cyathea tomentosissima, a tree fern that won't leave you indifferent

    How to grow a tree fern?

    Tree ferns are plants which, although there are many different species, require more or less the same care. This means that if you buy for example Blechnum and then get Cyathea, I am almost 100% sure that both of them will be valuable if you take care of them like this:

    • Ubicación :
      • Outdoor: Place it in a bright place, but out of direct sunlight. It is best to place it in the shade of a large tree with a wide crown or under a shading net.
      • Interior: the room should be bright, without drafts.
    • irrigation : often, especially in summer. You should keep the soil moist, except during the winter, or if you have it indoors, when it's best to let it dry out a bit. If possible, use lime-free water and do not wet the leaves.
    • follower : in spring and summer with organic fertilizers such as guano (available here).
    • Pickup or transfer time : in spring when the minimum temperature rises above 15ºC.
    • Plagues and diseases : they are very persistent. But you have to control the risks, and if the environment is very dry and hot, mealybugs.
    • multiplication : in spring spores to be stored in the seed bed near a heat source.

    Where to buy tree fern?

    These plants are usually sold in nurseries, but from my own experience I recommend that you search the Internet for nurseries or online stores that are manufacturers and specialize in selling .


    Learn more