How to hit a low golf shot under trees


How to Hit a Low Punch Shot Under the Trees

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A reader of the site emailed me the other day, and was looking for help with the low punch shot required to get out of trouble. Luckily this is one of my specialties, so I was happy to help him out.

This is probably one of the most important shots to master at any level, especially for high handicappers. When you hit your tee shot off line, and find yourself in trouble, the next decision you make is very important. I can’t tell you how many times I have saved a hole because of a great punch shot out of the trees.

Many golfers opt to “go for it,” and try and pull off a low percentage shot, which generally compounds your mistake. Usually the smarter play is to find the biggest opening, and just punch your ball back onto the fairway.

Take your medicine, and move on.

How to play it

The shot itself is not that complicated, but the reason most golfers don’t know how to do it is because they never practice it on the range, and/or they are using the wrong technique.

The biggest mistake players make is that they take way too long of a swing, which has a tendency to send the ball on a higher trajectory. Everything about this shot should be abbreviated.

Think of it as more of a chip shot rather than a full swing.

Here are some keys to hitting a low punch shot that can get you out of trouble:

  • You don’t have to hit the ball as hard as you think to advance it 30-60 yards, and running down the fairway. Making clean contact is the most important part. Think about doing 20-40% of your normal swing.
  • Address the ball like a chip shot. Keep your weight forward, hands ahead of the ball (shaft leaning forward), and position the ball further back in your stance. Your goal is to make contact with the ball first, and “trap” it. Clean contact is the most important part!
  • Your follow through is abbreviated, and try to finish with the club face lower to the ground.
  • Your arms, and the rotation of your torso mostly dictate the shot. Your lower body will be completely quiet.

You can vary the height of your shot by the club you select, and the length of your swing. This is where experimentation on the range is crucial.

Personally I will use anything between a 4-iron to 8-iron. If I am trying to hit a really low shot that runs, I choose a 4-iron and try to keep the club face closed through impact. If I have some more room to work with in terms of height, and I don’t want the ball to run, I might use a 7 or 8-iron.

Just like your wedge shots, the length of your swing will help determine how far the ball will travel. I have always found that shorter is better since making proper contact with the ball is your number one goal.

Since I’m not into video lessons yet, I wanted to show you one that illustrates everything I have just said. I think these instructors do a great job. Pay attention to how short his swing is.

This shot is only valuable if you practice it though. It’s not difficult to execute, and can save you a ton of strokes. You just need to work on the range a bit to feel comfortable with the technique and understanding your trajectories and distances with various clubs.

If you ever have questions feel free to email me – [email protected]

I am happy to help anyone out!

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About the Author

Jon Sherman is the owner of Practical Golf, a website dedicated to being an honest resource for the everyday golfer who is looking to enjoy the game more, as well as improve. He is the author of the bestselling book 101 Mistakes All Golfers Make (and how to fix them). You can find him on Twitter here - @practicalgolf, where he is happy to chat about golf with anyone.

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Hitting From Under a Tree

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Know When to Fold Em

Damage Control

So you've smoked it off the tee, but you're in the furniture. Hearing a lot of lumber as your ball bounces around like it's in a pinball machine you now regret trying to kill it off the tee. Instead of looking back with regret though, it's important that you focus on the present and that's the shot that faces you now. At this point it's all about damage control. Now it's simple really. You have only 2 choices. 1) Go for it and try to be a hero or 2) play it safe and stop the bleeding. The obvious answer is #2; play it safe right? Well not always. Like anything else in golf you have to make a calculated decision after you've weighed all the facts. 9 times out of 10, yes, the answer is play it safe, but there is that one time that you may be leading a tournament and the risk is worth the reward. For the purpose of this article though we are going to assume, you, like the rest of us mortals aren't in a sudden death playoff to win the Masters.

Have a Plan

Most of the time when you get caught in the woods you will still have a reasonable shot at par or bogey. That's right I said par. That's because it is not really meant to penalize you an entire stroke, but maybe a half stroke in some cases. If you get it out into play again and sink a good one putt, you won't miss a beat. The decision you make can end in a par, bogey or a quad. It's up to you. Knowing your options and how to get the ball back out in play will help you to make an informed decision when the pressure is on. Taking the following steps will eliminate any doubt and help you execute the shot smoothly:

  • Have a game plan - This means you that you have a strategy and hopefully it's damage control. This doesn't only mean punching the ball back out into play though, it involves picking the perfect target and distance so that you leave yourself the most ideal shot to the green that's possible. The last thing you want to do is punch it too far and end up in trouble on the other side of the fairway or hit a great shot out and end up with another tree in your way.
  • Don't be a hero - Again, 9 times out of 10 you should just focus on getting the ball out and avoid unnecessary risks. You've got to "know when to fold em".
  • Pick a much lower lofted club - Unfortunately some players do go down in loft, but not enough. Then they pull off the perfect shot, but the ball jumps up and hits the tree because they didn't go down in club enough. Better safe than sorry.
  • Choke up on the club - Choking up does wonders for keeping your hands in front of the club head and helping you deloft the face at impact. The shaft naturally becomes a bit stiffer and the ball will shoot out low. It's a simple way to make a big difference in your loft.
  • Play the ball back - To catch the ball with a more hooded face early in the downswing play the ball back of the center of your stance. How much is a judgement call, but the lower you want to go, the more you should probably move it back. Be careful however if you are in the rough as going back too far can make it hard to loft the ball at all.
  • Set your weight forward - The more in front of the ball you get your head and sternum, the lower you will hit the ball. Be carefull not to back up because if your head and upper spine move behind the ball you will add loft on the clubface and balloon the ball upwards.
  • Finish low - When you finish low you typically stay over or in front of the ball and keep your hands further ahead through impact. Both of these help you to deloft the face and start the ball out low.
  • Make a shorter swing - With only a 1/2 to 3/4 length swing it is definitely easier for most players to release later through impact and avoid backing up. With a longer swing things can get kind of wild and it's easier to lose control.
  • Swing smooth - It's easy to want to get more distance on this shot as you really feel you have to make up for your first mistake that got you in this situation to begin with. It's not smart, however, to swing hard because the more speed you generate, the more the ball is going to shoot up. It's also easy to fall back when you are trying to get more power. Swing smooth and the ball will stay down.

That's 9 points to consider. Seems like a lot doesn't it? Well it won't after you get in the habit of automatically running through each point when you have to punch out from under a tree. If you think about it, they are really simple steps to take too. Forgetting one though, can sabotage your entire plan. Even if you pick the right club, set up correctly, try to swing smooth and finish low, if you fall back through the shot the ball will shoot up and hit the tree branch anyway. It's a matter of taking your time and covering all the bases.

The Situation:

You want to know how to successfully hit a ball under a tree.

The Solution:

As illustrated above, there are several steps you can take to ensure that your trajectory will stay down and keep you out of getting in even more trouble. Follow these 9 steps to get the ball back into play:

1) Have a game plan.
2) Don't be a hero.
3) Choke up on your club.
4) Pick a much lower lofted club.
5) Play the ball back in your stance.
6) Set your weight forward.
7) Finish low.
8) Make a 1/2 - 3/4 length swing.
9) Swing smooth.

Maria Palozola

Maria Palozola is a member of the LPGA and has participated in multiple LPGA Tour events. She has provided instruction to thousands of students in the past 20+ years and has won multiple teaching awards from the LPGA, Golf Digest, and Golf Magazine including being ranked as one of the top 50 female instructors in the world.

More Info on Shot Making

  • Shot Making Tips
  • Shot Making Drills
  • Shot Making Lessons
    • Clubbing Correctly With Wind
    • Controlling Trajectory
    • Controlling Trajectory: Getting Loft
    • Controlling Trajectory: How Low Can You Go?
    • Hitting From Under a Tree
    • Hitting Off a Cart Path
    • Hitting Out of a Divot
    • Hitting Out of Deep Rough
    • Hitting Over a Tree
    • How to Hit a Knock Down
    • Uneven Lies
    • Uneven Lies: Hitting a Ball Above Your Feet
    • Uneven Lies: Hitting a Ball Below Your Feet
    • Uneven Lies: Hitting From a Downhill Lie
    • Uneven Lies: Hitting From an Uphill Lie
    • Working the Ball
    • Working the Ball: Drawing the Ball
    • Working the Ball: Hitting a Fade/Slice

Golf technique — Golf Moldova

Have you ever wondered how Tiger Woods, Annika Sorenstem and other professional players manage to completely control their balls? The answer is simple - they have perfected every aspect of the game of golf. This is a very technical game where you need to practice various technical movements. In this section, you will learn how to play golf correctly.

2010-08-11 22:26

As discussed in the Stance and Ball Flight sections, how you stand determines the direction of the ball.

Your stops should be in line with the target. If you take your foot off the target, it will cause a deflection or fade. If you get too close, good things are not worth waiting for either. The direction of the face of the club is also of great importance for the trajectory of the ball. When you prepare to hit, try to aim with the bottom groove of the club face. Remember that the stick is designed so that the top edge is aimed at the left side of the target. We present to your attention the types of racks that differ in the position of the feet relative to the target:

Square stance

This type of stance means that your feet and the face of the stick are pointing towards the target. The toes are parallel to the target and the surface of the stick is perpendicular to the target.

Open Stance

This type of stance means that your left foot, or the one closest to the target, is slightly out to the side and your shoulders are in line with the target. Such a stance usually results in a deflection or fade, as the force comes from "outside in" and the ball is directed from left to right. This type of stance is best suited for chip punches.

Closed stance

To get into a closed stance, you need to move the left foot or the one closest to the target to an imaginary line. It may appear that you are aiming to the right side. Your shoulders and legs are pointing straight ahead, but you are aiming for the right side of the target. The result is a right-to-left rotation of the ball as you hit it from the inside out.

As you take a stance and prepare to hit, remember that the distance between your feet and the ball will vary depending on the stick you are using. For short irons, the ball must be placed in the center of the foot. If you are using long irons or 5-woods, the ball should be placed directly in front of the feet in the middle. For long woods, including the driver, the ball is placed directly against the front left foot. In such cases, the face of the club on a downswing must form a right angle with the target line.

The longer the stick, the wider the stance. The driver requires a wider stance, and short irons a narrower one. Shoulder-width stance is good for 5-woods and long irons.

2010-08-11 22:27

Proper stance ensures a firm position throughout the swing and better control of the ball.

Your foot position and posture affect the angle of the swing, which determines the direction of the ball. Good preparation and stance help to maintain balance during the swing, allowing the ball to be hit with the center of the face of the ball. You can make a great swing, but without the right stance, your ball will end up anywhere but on target.

Here are some tips for getting the perfect stance:

  • Feet should be shoulder-width apart. This stance is best for medium length irons. Shorter irons will require a narrower stance, while longer irons will require a wider stance. The general rule is that the longer the stick, the wider the stance; and the shorter the stick, the narrower the stance should be.
  • The toe closest to the target must be rotated 7 cm towards the target.
  • The toe farthest from the target must point to a point perpendicular to the target.
  • Bend your knees slightly and keep your back straight.
  • The sole of the stick must be on the ground.
  • Weight should be slightly transferred to the balls of the fingers.
  • Arms should be extended to form a wedge.
  • The face of the stick must form a right angle with the target, approximately from the middle to the left.

Position of the ball during preparation

The position of the ball during preparation mainly depends on the type of stick you are using. Here are some guidelines on how to place the ball depending on the club:

  • Short Irons: The ball must be placed in the center of the upright.
  • Long irons and 5-woods: Place the ball in front of you in the center of the upright, approximately one ball away from the center of the upright towards the target.
  • Long woods including driver: the ball is placed directly in front of the right foot. That is, approximately two balls from the center of the rack towards the goal.

To test your position on the ball, hold your stick with your arms extended at waist level and parallel to the ground. Then lean forward and relax your arms. The ball must lie where the clubhead touches the ground. If the ball is further away, you will slouch or lean forward too much, i.e. you will have a wrong stance and a bad swing as a result.

In addition to the distance to the ball and its position, you need to maintain the correct posture. This means that the back should be straight, the head should form an angle with the spine and be behind the ball. The knees should be slightly bent, and the weight should be distributed evenly between the instep of the arch of the foot and the heels. Lower your chin, hands should lie freely, while the right hand should be lower than the left. If you follow these guidelines, you will definitely get the right swing.

2010-08-11 22:28

A good grip helps you make a good swing and gives the ball a chance to hit the target. The perfect grip allows you to control the stick in a way that feels comfortable and connected to the head of the stick.

There are three main types of grip. Choose the one that gives you a sense of control and is more comfortable for you.

Ten-Finger / Baseball Grip

This grip places the right hand on the index finger of the left hand. You hold the stick with all your fingers. This type of grip is ideal for those players who do not have very strong hands. Thanks to all ten fingers, the grip becomes stronger. This allows you to more easily relax your wrist when swinging, giving it more power. However, with this grip, it is more difficult to control the head of the stick.

Take the stick with your left hand. Place your right hand below, making sure all joints form a line with the shaft. Index, middle, ring fingers and little finger should be on the handle.

Lock

With this grip, the little finger of the right hand is intertwined with the index finger of the left hand. During the swing, with the “lock” grip, the hands are connected. Due to the fact that this grip requires less force than the overlap, it is ideal for women and players with small hands or short fingers.

Hold the stick with your left hand, three knuckles visible and thumb slightly to the right of the center of the grip. Then grab the stick with your right hand. The index, middle and ring fingers should touch the handle, and the little finger of the right hand should intertwine with the index finger of the left hand.

Overlap

Harry Vardon made him popular. With this grip, the little finger of the right hand is located on top between the index and middle fingers of the left hand. The ring finger of the right hand also touches the index finger of the left hand. With this grip, you feel like your hands are connected and working together during the swing. This type of grip is mainly used by professional golfers. Strong hands are required here as fewer fingers are used to control the stick.

The overlap is almost the same as the lock. The main difference is that in the overlap, the little finger of the right hand should be lower than the index finger of the left hand.

Putting Grip

Putting Grip is how you hold the stick when you putt. These are variations on the types of grips used on the tee-box and fairway. For putt, as a rule, an overlap or cross grip is used.

  • Overlap is a variation of the Vardon grip. You putt by holding the club so that the index finger of the left hand rests on the groove between the little finger and the ring finger of the right hand.
  • Cross grip. Place your right hand on the thick end of the putter handle. Then, with your left hand, grasp the club so that the brush touches the index finger of your right hand.

Look at the club to check if your grip is correct. The face of the stick must not form an angle with the shank. The sole should lie flat on the ground, and the palm of the right hand should be perpendicular to the ground. You can tweak the grip a bit, but try not to make too many changes. For a strong grip, rotate your left hand toward the top of the club handle. If you do this with your right hand, the grip will become weaker.

The most important thing to remember about the grip is that the stick must be held strong enough to control it, but don't overdo it or you'll get blisters. If you squeeze the stick too hard, the part of your hand that comes into contact with the thick end of the stick is likely to form blisters. It will also create tension in your hands and arms, weakening your swing flexibility. Also, do not forget that the position of the palms and fingers should not change throughout the entire swing.

2010-08-11 22:29

The perfect swing requires rhythm and balance.

The swing rhythm can be fast or slow depending on the body type and natural rhythm, but in any case the swing should be done smoothly. If you rush, you may lose your balance. To save it, you need the right stance.

Swing is divided into three stages, the first of which is the swing. When you swing, you move your stick away from the ball by drawing an imaginary line. A good swing gives the club strength and control.

STAGE 1

Feet must be shoulder width apart. Lean forward slightly and bend your knees. Hold the club with an overlap so that it is comfortable (the little finger of the right hand is intertwined with the index finger of the left hand). Don't grip the stick too hard or there won't be enough room for the hand to move, or too loose or the stick will slip out of your hand.

STAGE 2

Move your hands clockwise so that the stick is parallel to the line of your toes: the shaft should be parallel to the ground, your left knee should naturally move towards your right, and the stick and hands should be held at hip level.

STAGE 3

Rotate your back towards the target with your weight on the inside of your right knee.

STAGE 4

Bring your hands over your right shoulder. Rotate your shoulders to help your hands and arms go up. The hips will turn following the shoulders, then the left foot will turn on the inside, as a result of which the left knee will bend slightly towards the right. The heel of the left foot should remain on the ground, the right elbow pointing down.

Remember that the angle of your body stance determines the angle of the swing and ultimately the flight of the ball. Equally important is the transfer of body weight. Improper weight transfer will result in loss of balance and poor contact with the ball.

2010-08-11 22:30

Swing is the first movement in a full swing When downswinging, you are releasing tension from the backswing.

You "open" the body, first the hips, shoulders, arms, and then the hands. This movement must be directed towards the ball. You stretch your left hand towards the ball. The wrist will automatically straighten out at the bottom of the downswing.

STAGE 1

Bring your hands over your right shoulder. Rotate your shoulders to help your hands and arms go up. The hips will turn following the shoulder, then the left foot will turn on the inside, as a result of which the left knee will bend slightly towards the right. The heel of the left foot should remain on the ground, the right elbow pointing down.

STAGE 2

Rotate the left hip towards the target and return the left foot to its original position. The right foot should roll on the inside, causing the right knee to bend towards the left, which in turn turns towards the target. The right shoulder and stick will begin to drop in amplitude.

STAGE 3

Lower the left hand in front of the line of the toes, the right elbow comes down next to the right knee.

STAGE 4

Rotate the hip towards the target, and tilt the right knee towards the left, the shoulders will repeat this movement. The angle between the club shaft and the left forearm must not change while the club and hands are moving towards the line of the toes.

These are the perfect downswing moves. Study them carefully and practice them the next time you hit the golf course.

2010-08-11 22:34

The drive is the final stage of a complete swing. If you don't complete the swing correctly, you'll lose club head speed, shorten your flight distance, and you could get hurt if you don't let your body finish the motion you started.

The drive is the part of the swing that follows the ball being hit. With a good drive at the end of the swing, your hands should be near your head. The clubhead must be on the target line.

STAGE 1

Rotate the hip towards the target, and tilt the right knee towards the left, the shoulders will repeat this movement. The angle between the club shaft and the left forearm must not change while the club and hands are moving towards the line of the toes.

STAGE 2

Hit the ball. The right shoulder should be lower than the left. Turn the belt buckle towards the target.

STAGE 3

The right heel can rise due to inertia. The right hand and stick should be extended in a straight line. The wedge-shaped position of the hands during the wiring is preserved. This is a sign that the club has hit the ball at top speed.

STAGE 4

When driving, the hand must be behind the left shoulder. Most of the weight should be on the left foot, and the right foot should be on the toe to maintain balance.

These are movements for a perfect wiring. Study them carefully and practice them the next time you hit the golf course.

2010-08-11 22:36

Practicing a full swing is one of the biggest and most important tasks in golf. Many players are obsessed with mastering the perfect swing technique and practice it all the time on the practice and golf courses.

A full swing consists of three parts: backswing/retraction, downswing and drive. The full swing is used on the tee-box and often on the fairway. Other strikes with irons or wedges are only modified and usually shortened versions of the full swing.

STAGE 1

Feet shoulder width apart. Lean forward slightly and bend your knees. Hold the club with an overlap so that it is comfortable (the little finger of the right hand is intertwined with the index finger of the left hand). Don't grip the stick too hard or there won't be enough room for the hand to move, or too loose or the stick will slip out of your hand.

STAGE 2

Move your hands clockwise so that the stick is parallel to the line of your toes: the shaft should be parallel to the ground, your left knee should naturally move towards your right, and the stick and hands should be held at hip level.

STAGE 3

Rotate your back towards the target with your weight on the inside of your right knee.

STAGE 4

Bring your hands over your right shoulder. Rotate your shoulders to help your hands and arms go up. The hips will turn following the shoulders, then the left foot will turn on the inside, as a result of which the left knee will bend slightly towards the right. The heel of the left foot should remain on the ground, the right elbow pointing down.

STAGE 5

Rotate the left hip towards the target and return the left foot to its original position. The right foot should roll on the inside, causing the right knee to bend towards the left, which in turn turns towards the target. The right shoulder and stick will begin to drop in amplitude.

STAGE 6

Lower the left hand in front of the line of the toes, the right elbow comes down next to the right knee.

STAGE 7

Rotate the hip towards the target, and tilt the right knee towards the left, the shoulders will repeat this movement. The angle between the club shaft and the left forearm must not change while the club and hands are moving towards the line of the toes.

STAGE 8

Hit the ball. The right shoulder should be lower than the left. Turn the belt buckle towards the target.

STAGE 9

The right heel can rise due to inertia. The right hand and stick should be extended in a straight line. The wedge-shaped position of the hands during the wiring is preserved. This is a sign that the club has hit the ball at top speed.

STAGE 10

When driving, the hand must be behind the left shoulder. Most of the weight should be on the left foot, and the right foot should be on the toe to maintain balance.

Knowing the step-by-step directions and principles of each swing movement will help you avoid deflection shots, undershots, overshoots and hitting obstacles. Each stage plays an important role in the execution of the perfect swing. The swing gives strength to the swing: the better the swing, the farther the ball will fly. In a downswing, you drive your stick towards the ball and hit it. If you aim poorly, you will hit the left or right side of the ball, resulting in a hook or deflection. The drive completes the swing smoothly, and the correct execution of this movement is essential for a good hit.

2010-08-11 22:42

After making a long tee drive, you will, if everything goes well, get to the fairway, where you have to make the next shot.

On par-4 holes, you will most often cover a distance of approximately 100 yards (91 m). This distance is ideal for pitching. This is a medium length shot that is taken from approximately 40-90 yards (36-82 m) from the green. Pitching is done with a stick - pitching wedge or sand wedge. For longer pitch shots, you can use 5-iron or 6-iron. Learn about the pitching technique in this section:

STAGE 1

Take an open stance with feet to the left of the target line.

STAGE 2

Before you hit, look at the field. Shift your weight onto your front foot.

STAGE 3

Swing. You can raise the stick to waist or shoulder level, or do a full swing. This will depend on the type of impact. Bend your wrist slightly to make a hammer-like strike. The back of the left hand and the face of the stick must face forward.

STAGE 4

Keep your arms and club head still while driving so that the face stays at right angles to the target for longer, increasing the chances of the ball going up and staying on course.

Remember that the purpose of pitching is to get the ball high and over the rough or hurdles. In this case, after landing, the ball will roll less. The higher the ball flies, the shorter the roll.

2010-08-11 22:42

After a tee shot or drive on the fairway, you will most likely only have to go a short distance to the green. For this, a chip-hit or a pitch-hit is used.

A chip shot is a technical short shot that is made within 30 yards (27 m) of the green. Pitch hitting is usually done with irons with a smaller loft - from number 5 to number 7. There are two general types of chip strike:

Bump and run strike (jump and roll)

A bump and run will cause the ball to fly in a fairly low trajectory, bounce on the green, roll on the green, and at best hit the hole. For this type of shot, it is recommended to use clubs with a smaller loft, such as 8th, 7th or 6th iron. Take an open stance and put the ball away. The face of the club must be covered so that the ball does not fly as high as usual. Make a swing that is enough to hit. Then hit like a hammer hitting the ground and the ball at the same time. Finish the blow by sliding on the ground and wiring.

Flop hit

This type of hit is used when you want the ball to fly on a very high trajectory, for example if there is sand or water in the way. The secret is to open the face of the club and bring the club under the ball to make it bounce.

STAGE 1

Take an open stance so you can see the target line clearly. The feet should be slightly to the left of the ball. Lean forward slightly and bend your knees.

STAGE 2

Look at the field before hitting the ball. Look at the place where you think the ball should fall.

STAGE 3

Swing. Bend your wrist slightly to make a hammer-like strike.

STAGE 4

Don't turn your wrist when you pass. It should form a straight line after the impact.

Chipping is a fairly simple technique. Learn to take the right stance and make the right chip punch. Mastering this technique will have a positive impact on your game. Putting technique is one of the most important in golf. Putting decides the outcome of the game at each hole, and the ratio of bogey to body depends on the good mastery of this technique.

Swing requires much finer and finer movements than a full swing. It is also called pendulum swing for the similarity of the club's amplitude with the pendulum. With this swing, the elbow and wrist remain in the same position from beginning to end.

STAGE 1

Stand behind the ball and look at the field, in particular at the line of putt.

STAGE 2

Practice your putt before you actually hit the ball.

STAGE 3

Move closer to the ball. Look straight at the ball. Look at the line of putt to check if the position is correct. Move the putter about 10 inches (25 cm) away from the ball.

STAGE 4

Hit the ball.

STAGE 5

The wiring will be approximately 10 inches. Remember that the movement of the club should resemble the pendulum of a clock. If done correctly, the ball will roll longer (downhill) and shorter (uphill). The secret of putting is distance control. Practice swinging and swinging from different distances. This way you can determine how far the ball will roll based on a particular swing.

Mastering the technique of putting is a matter of practice during which you gain a feel for the putter and learn to "read" the green. It will help you a lot on the field.

2010-08-11 22:44

Overcoming obstacles in golf is the most difficult task. It is always frustrating when it seems to you that you made a good swing, but in reality you made a mistake in calculating the distance, and the ball landed in an obstacle - water, sand, under a tree or in a hole.

However, one of the great things about golf is when the ball hits the bunker, almost sinks into the sand, and you manage to kick it out of the hazard and into the hole. Making a good hit from an obstacle is the most difficult and interesting task that will bring great pleasure. In this section you will learn how to hit in a bunker and how to overcome other obstacles:

Sand Traps and Fairway Bunkers

Description: A bunker is a hole in a golf course. If it has sand in it, it is called a Sand Trap. If the bunker is on a fairway, it is called a fairway bunker. If you hit this hazard, you won't get a free kick, the only problem is that you have to return the ball to the fairway and the green.

Solution: Use a sand wedge or a pitching wedge to get the ball out of a sand trap or fairway bunker. Forget about distance, this shot requires high precision. However, if you are still quite far from the green, you can use the 6-iron for a long shot. Take an open stance and mark a spot 20 yards (18 m) from the bunker. Dig a little sand with a stick and knock the ball to the surface. In this case, you must hit the ball and the sand at the same time.

Ball positions in bunker

Lay is the position of the ball after it has been hit. It can be good and bad. If you hit the fairway, the ball will definitely have a good position and it will be easier for you to hit the green. However, if the ball hits the sand bunker, its position cannot be called good. If you are lucky, the ball will simply fall on the sand, if not, it may hopelessly get stuck in the sand. To return it to the fairway or the green, you first have to analyze the position of the ball. To try to knock the ball out of the hazard and return it to the court, you can use a special stick called a sand wedge. In this section, you will learn about different positions and how to deal with bad ball positions.

Good position

Description: Golfers sometimes face the problem of getting the ball into the bunker. You can only hope for the ball to fall on a relatively flat surface, i.e. took a good position. So it will be easy for you to cope with the obstacle in case the ball hits it.

Solution: To get the ball out of the sand, take an open stance and try to dig your feet into the sand so you don't lose your balance on impact. Focus on a point about two inches (5 cm) behind the ball, slowly lower your stick and kick the ball off the sand.

Fried Egg

Description: The name Fried Egg refers to the position of the ball. A ball in the sand resembles an egg yolk and a white around it.

Solution: Use an aggressive "bump and run" punch. Take an open stance and turn the stick so that the face is facing the ball, not the sky. Then try to hit the ball and the sand at the same time.

Burial

Description: The ball is in a position where it sinks deep into the sand, while most of it is under the sand. If the ball is "buried", it is more difficult to cope with this situation than with "fried eggs".

Solution: You can use the same technique as with fried eggs. Use the "bump and run" punch, but you need to swing harder. Instead of a sand wedge, use a pitching wedge to kick the ball out of the sand.

Water Hazards

Description: Most beginner golfers are afraid to hit the ball near a water hazard such as a pond, lake or marsh that is along or on the golf course. Hitting a water hazard is really confusing, especially when the ball is still in the air, and you bitterly realize that this threatens you with a penalty point.

Solution: If you have a water hazard in front of you, all you have to do is focus on a spot 15 yards (13 m) past the hazard. Keep your eyes on this point and make a full aggressive swing. Aim with reserve. It is better for the ball to fly over than to fall into the water.

Trees and other obstacles

Description: If the ball goes over the fairway, it may get stuck in the trees surrounding the court, or you will have to shoot blindly, ie. without seeing the target.

Solution: To get out of difficult situations on the golf course, such as when the ball is stuck in the trees, try to find a small open area that leads to the fairway. If there is such an area, use a 3-iron or 4-iron and make an aggressive "jump and roll" punch. This will cause the ball to bounce on a low trajectory, then roll across the lot and back onto the fairway. Don't let the ball fly, you don't want it to get stuck in the tree branches.

Blind Shot

Description: As mentioned earlier, sometimes the ball accidentally hits an area where you can't see the green or even the fairway. Trees, rocks, or other obstructions can obscure the view of the green, making it harder to hit.

Solution: The secret to hitting blind is to try to find a spot to look at. Walk or roll forward and look at the target. Look for some landmarks to help you when you get back to the ball. For example, you saw a tree growing in the background of your target. When you do a blind shot, aim for the top of this tree.

Swamps and weedy areas

Description: At some point in the round, you may encounter a weedy area, swamp, or other similar obstacle.

Solution: If the distance to the fairway is approximately 150 yards (137 m) or less, hit as if there was a water hazard in front of you. Aim at a point 15 yards (13 m) behind the obstacle and use a medium iron to increase the ball's trajectory. So the margin for error you will have more and higher chance to overcome this barrier.

Dealing with other bad ball positions

The ball does not always stay in good position after being hit. Sometimes it lands in a hole that looks like a miniature sand trap, or under a tree. Such positions require a certain skill and technique.

In the hole

Description: The hole is the groove that is left after you use a club to pull a piece of turf out of the field. In some cases, the ball may hit it. It is unpleasant when your ball ends up in a hole left by another player. It is etiquette for golfers to restore the turf. Most players carry a "repair" kit with them.

Solution: If your ball lands in a hole, it is recommended to use a club with a large loft to get the ball out of it. Then take a stance, stepping back from the ball. Swing high and lower the club quickly as you hit the ball. It will likely roll longer than usual since this shot will not have spin.

Under the tree

Description: If your ball accidentally hits the rough, it may fall under the tree. The branches of the trees are intertwined, so if the ball flies too high after your hit, it can get stuck there.

Solution: If the ball lands under a tree, it is better to use 3-iron and 4-iron. Your goal is to make the ball roll out of this obstacle. Punch like you're doing a hard putt. The trajectory must be low so that the ball does not get stuck in the branches.

Solid Seam

Description: A hard seam is a rocky hard surface. The problem is that when hit on such a surface, the ball rolls for too long, i. e. distance increases. When hit on a hard formation, the stick bounces, so the top of the ball is often hit.

Solution: Here it is better to use a 9-iron or pitching wedge and use the same technique as for the fried egg position.

Needles or leaves

Description: Since trees grow along the field, leaves or needles lie on it. Although these obstacles can be brushed away, sometimes you have to hit the ball surrounded by foliage. Such leaves serve as a sand trap.

Solution: To get out of this situation, use a fairway bunker shot. Get into an open stance, focus on a spot two inches behind the ball, slowly lower your stick and hit the ball.

Uncomfortable stance

Description: Uncomfortable stance is when you stand on an uneven surface where it is difficult to get the correct stance. For example, one leg is inside the bunker, the other is outside or on a steep slope.

Solution: In this situation, bend your knees and try to find your balance. Make a big swing with the sand wedge.

Getting the ball out of a difficult position is not easy. It requires patience, practice and skillful wiring.

2010-08-11 22:45

A golf ball can go anywhere depending on your stance and swing. As discussed in the stance types section, an open stance will result in a fade or deflection of the flight path as the swing is "outside in". On the other hand, a good full swing will result in the ball going straight to the target. The type of ball you use will also affect its flight. If your shot gives the ball too much lateral twist and you use a ball that tends to spin, the fade (hit with a little deflection) is bound to turn into a slice (hit with a lot of deflection).

Hook

When the ball flies with a significant deflection from right to left, this is called a hook. The cause of a hook is the opposite of that of a slice, but the ball usually rolls longer after the hook than after the slice. A hook typically occurs when the face of the club is covered or pointed at the left side of the target on impact. Here are some tips on how to avoid the hook:

  • Swing back and stop at the top to check the stick position.
  • See if the toe of the club face is pointing up. If so, then the facial surface is closed, which only happens when the right wrist is bent. In this case, you need to slightly straighten your wrist, and the head of the club will drop more evenly on impact.
  • You can also adjust the grip. Try to move your right hand closer to the top, and not to the sides. The farther you move your hand, the weaker your grip and the more difficult it is to close the head of the club.

Pool

Antonym of push. The ball flies straight ahead, but to the left of the target. Pooling occurs when the path of the club head through the touch zone lies on a line to the left of the target and the face is perpendicular to that line.

Draw

The ball spins from right to left, creating a slight deflection from right to left. Any player dreams of such a flight of the ball. A draw is a controlled hook. It can be achieved by ceasing to cover the face of the stick and bend the right wrist. Draw is the antonym of fade.

A draw is obtained if the path of the swing during the hit goes from the target line, straightens out on the hit, and goes to the target line after the hit. During the stroke, the face of the club must be directed directly at the target line.

Fade

The ball flies with a slight deflection from left to right. A fade is similar to a slice, the only difference being that the left-to-right deflection is smaller in a fade than in a slice, and this flight path is usually deliberately chosen to follow the contour of the hole from left to right.

Push

The ball flies straight but to the right of the target - this occurs when the path of the club head through the touch zone lies on a line to the right of the target and the face is perpendicular to that line.

The swing path is too "inside out" and the club face faces directly into this path.

Slice

A common beginner mistake is to hit the ball from the outside to give it spin from left to right. For this trajectory, the club hits the ball from right to left. A sharp deviation from left to right is called a slice. Typically, this flight of the ball is due to the fact that the player raises his hand too high during the swing, and the subsequent looped swing goes out. To avoid this unwanted trajectory, follow these tips:

  • Take a normal stance with a 5-iron or 6-iron.
  • Grip as usual and lower your right hand slightly along the shaft towards the head of the club until the distance between your right and left hand is about three inches (7-8 cm).
  • Practice doing 10-15 strokes as often as you can.
  • When downswinging, do not turn the stick with your right hand. Let the left hand control the swing. You should feel the left hand turning, creating a perfect angle for the club head.
  • It is better to take a closed stance, as it gives the ball a spin from right to left.

We talked about several types of flights. Learn to distinguish between them. For more information, check out our Golf Balls section.

Golf technique

Golf rules in brief

No one really knows when people started playing golf. Some historians claim that as far back as the first century BC, the Romans played this game, only under the name "paganica", using a curved stick and a stuffed leather ball. The Chinese claim that their ancestors also played a similar game, which they called "chuiwan", however, later than the Romans, between the 8th and 14th centuries.
However, it is only more or less certain that the modern game of golf originated in Scotland in the 15th century during the reign of King James II. Who soon banned this game (in 1457), since it allegedly diverted attention from learning to shoot from a bow.

Dutch golf historian Steven J. H. van Hengel, who is one of the recognized experts on its origins, believes that golf probably appeared as a result of a combination of equipment used in the Belgian "chole" and the rules of the French "jeu de mail" - two games "brought" to Holland in the 17th century. The game was called "kolf" (kolven).

It is known that the first official tournament was the Scottish Open, which took place on October 7, 1860 in Ayrshire.

Players are allowed to carry a set of no more than 14 clubs or clubs that vary in size, shape or length. According to the USGA, a golf ball can be no larger than 1.68 inches (4.26 cm) in diameter. On the other hand, the British ball is slightly smaller than its American counterpart.

A golf course typically has 18 holes set in landscaped ground that typically includes many hazards - water, bumps, sand traps (also known as bunkers), trees - that are designed to make the game more playable. difficult. Difficulty is also increased by varying distances between holes. Play for each hole begins at the teeing area from which players tee off or dribble into the fairway. At the end of the hole territory - which can vary in length from 150 to 600 yards (135 to 550 m) - there is a "green" area surrounding the hole proper, or "cup" into which the ball must be driven in order to complete the hole.

Golf is usually played in groups of two to four people moving around the course together. Each player takes turns playing their own ball. The ball must be played from where it lies, except in unusual cases where the rules allow the ball to be moved to a slightly better position. In a stroke competition, the total number of strokes used to move the ball from and to the hole is recorded as the player's score for that individual hole. The player who uses the fewest strokes to complete the field is the winner.

In match play, scores are compared after each hole and the player wins, loses or shares (tie) each hole.

The Official Rules of Golf is approximately 100 pages long booklet published by the USGA and R&A. Therefore, here is a brief version of the rules - a kind of introduction to the full rules of the game.

Rule 1: Play.

Holes on a golf course must be played in order (1-9 or 1-18) unless the committee decides otherwise.

You must always play by the Rules. You are not allowed to change or ignore them.

Rule 2: Match play.

In match play, each hole is a separate competition.

then you go "with an even score" ("all-square").

You have won the match when you put more balls into the holes than there are left to play. For example, if you are 3 points ahead of your opponent and there are only two holes left to play, you are

won with a score of "three - two".

Anyone you play against is your "opponent".

Rule 3: Stroke Play Competition.

In a stroke competition, the competitor with the lowest total score per round (or rounds) is the winner.

You must hole your ball before starting the next hole.

Anyone you play with is a "fellow-competitor".

It is not possible to play match play and stroke play at the same time.

Rule 4/Rule 5: Clubs and ball.

You may carry no more than fourteen clubs.

You may not change balls during the play of a hole unless the rule allows it. However, if you damage your ball or it loses shape, you may change the ball after consulting your competitor or “fellow competitor”.

Rule 6: Obligations of a player.

Read the notices given to you by the tournament leaders.

Know your starting time and be ready to play at that time.

Make sure you can identify your own ball (put a mark on the ball in case someone else is using an identical ball).

In a stroke contest, make sure your score for each hole is correct and sign your card before returning it.

Do not unnecessarily drag out the game - keep up with the group ahead. If there are dangers from lightning, you get sick, or the leader tells you to stop, then stop playing, otherwise keep playing.

Rule 7: Practice.

You may not practice while playing a hole or from any obstruction. Generally, practice is not allowed on the field before a hitting competition, but is allowed on the field before match play. However, the committee can change this rule, so always check the conditions of the competition.

Rule 8: Advice on how to play.

During a round, you may not ask advice on how to play from anyone other than your caddy or partner. However, you can ask anyone about the Rules or the position of the obstacles or the flagpole.

You cannot advise your opponent or fellow competitor.

Do not place any markers to mark your line of play.

Rule 9: Notifying the opponent of hits taken.

In match play, you must tell your opponent the number of strokes, including penalties you have taken, if asked.

Law 10: Order of play.

The player with the lowest score on the hole is entitled to play his/her ball first on the next hole. This is called "honor".

When playing a hole, the player whose ball is furthest from the hole plays first.

In match play, if you play out of turn, your opponent may force you to replay your stroke. This is not the case in stroke play.

Rule 11: Placement of the ball for the first stroke.

Position your tee-ball between or slightly behind the tee-markers. You may place your first-stroke ball up to two club-lengths behind the markers.

If your ball accidentally falls off the tee before you make your first hit, you may replace it without penalty.

Rule 12: Finding a ball in an obstruction/ball identification.

An obstruction is any bunker (depression containing sand) or water obstruction (lake, stream, drainage ditch, etc.).

In a bunker or water hazard, if sand or leaves cover your ball, you can remove enough sand or leaves to see part of the ball.

You may lift your ball to identify yourself anywhere on the field. You must tell your opponent or fellow competitor before you pick up your ball to identify him.

Rule 13: Play the ball from where it lies.

You must play the ball from where it lies. You cannot move it to a better place.

You cannot improve your position by pressing behind the ball. The stick may only be placed on the ground slightly behind the ball.

You cannot improve the area of ​​your position, the line of impact or the ball by bending or breaking anything that grows, such as tree branches or long grass.

In a bunker you may not touch the sand, in a water hazard, touch the ground or water with your club before or during your kickback.

At any obstacle, you cannot remove loose obstacles (natural objects such as leaves or branches), but you can remove obstacles (artificial objects such as bottles or rakes).

Law 14: Striking the ball.

You must hit the ball with the head of the club. You may not push, clean or move the ball, accept any assistance or use any artificial assistance in making your stroke.

You must not hit the ball while it is moving (unless it is in the water).

Law 15: Playing a wrong ball.

If you play a ball that is not yours, you lose a hole in match play or incur a two-stroke penalty in stroke play.

Rule 16: Golf course.

If any part of your ball touches the level ground around the hole (“green”), the ball is considered to be on the level ground around the hole.

When your ball is on level ground around the hole, you may remove leaves and other loose obstructions, but may not otherwise touch your line of play.

You may not check the surface of the level ground around the hole by rolling the ball or cleaning the surface.

Always mark your ball by placing a small coin or other marker behind it when you want to pick it up to clear it or get it out of the way of another player.

If your ball is overhanging the rim of the hole, you can wait ten seconds to see if it falls in. If it falls after 10 seconds, add a free kick to your score.

Rule 17: Flagpole.

If your ball is on level ground around a hole, do not put the ball into the hole if there is a flagpole in the hole. Either take out the flagpole, or have another player take it out and hold it when you play your ball. In match play, if you put the ball into the hole and your ball hits the flagpole while it is in the hole, you lose the hole. In stroke play, you must add two free strokes to your score.

Law 18: Ball moved.

If you or your partner touch or move your ball on purpose or by accident, add a free kick to your score and replace the ball. If you do not return the ball to its place, add two free kicks.

If someone or something else moves your ball, there is no penalty, but you must replace the ball.

If the ball is moved by wind or water, you must play it from where it lies.

If the ball moves while you are preparing to kick, add a free kick and replace the ball.

Law 19: Ball Deflected or Stopped While Moving.

If your ball hits you, your partner, your caddy or your equipment, you are penalized one stroke and must play your ball from where it lies.

In match play, if your ball hits your opponent, his caddy, or his equipment, there is no penalty; You can play the ball from where it lies or replay the stroke.

In stroke play, if your ball hits a fellow competitor, caddy, his equipment, or anything else, there is no penalty and the ball is played from where it lies.

If your ball hits another ball and moves it, you must play your ball from where it lies. The owner of the other ball must replace it. If your ball is on level ground around the hole when you play, and the ball your ball is hitting is also on level ground around the hole, you are penalized two strokes in stroke play. Otherwise, there is no penalty.

Law 20: Lifting and dropping the ball.

If you are going to lift your ball under a rule and the rule requires the ball to be replaced, you must place the ball-marker before you lift the ball.

When you throw in the ball, stand straight and keep your arm in a straight line.

If you play a ball from the wrong place, you lose a hole in match play or receive two free strokes in stroke play.

Rule 21: Cleaning the ball.

You may clean your ball when you pick it up, with a few exceptions: when you check if it is unplayable, identify it, or if it interferes with another player's play.

Law 22: Ball Interfering with or Assisting Play.

If another ball interferes with your swing or is on your line of play, you may ask the owner of the ball to pick it up.

If your ball is near the hole and could help another player, you may lift your ball.

Rule 23: Loose obstacles.

Loose obstacles - natural objects that do not grow or are not fixed - such as loose leaves, twigs, fallen branches, stones and insects. You may remove a loose obstruction unless both your ball and the free obstruction are in a bunker or water hazard. (For an exception, see rule 12-1).

If your ball moves as a result of the removal of a loose obstruction, you incur a one-stroke penalty if your ball is not on level ground around the hole.

Rule 24: Barriers.

Barriers are non-natural or man-made objects. Bottles, cans, rakes, etc. are moving obstacles.

Sprinkler heads, kart lanes, etc. are immovable barriers.

Movable obstacles anywhere on the field can be removed.

If the ball moves when the hazard moves, there is no penalty and the ball must be replaced.

Rule 25: Random water; repaired piece of land; holes made by animals.

Intermittent water is any temporary water caused by rain or overwatering. A patch of land being repaired is any damaged area that the Committee has identified as such.

If your ball or position is in random water, on a patch of ground being repaired, or in an animal burrow, you can either play the ball from where it is or find the closest spot, not closer to the hole, that gives you the best position , and drop the ball within one club length of that spot.

If your ball is in random water etc. and you cannot find it, determine where the ball hit that area and drop the ball within one club length of that spot without penalty.

Rule 26: Water obstacles.

Water hazard boundaries are identified by yellow stakes or lines. The boundaries of a lateral water hazard are identified by red stakes or lines.

If your ball is in a water hazard or a laural water hazard, you may play the ball from where it is.

Law 27: Ball lost or out of bounds.

A ball is lost if it is not found within five minutes after you first started looking or you put another ball in play.

The ball is out of bounds when it is entirely behind the inside line of objects such as white stakes, a fence or a wall that marks the boundary of the field.

If your ball is lost or out of bounds, you must add a free kick to your score and play a different ball from where you made your last kick (known as "stroke and distance").

If you think your ball may be lost or out of bounds, you may play a provisional ball from where your first ball was played.

You must tell your opponent or fellow competitor that you are playing a provisional ball and play it before you leave the area to look for the first ball.

If you cannot find your first ball, or if it is out of bounds, you must count all strokes with the first ball and provisional ball, add a penalty stroke, and end the hole with the provisional ball. If you find your first ball inbounds, you must continue with it and pick up the provisional ball.

Law 28: Unplayable ball.

If your ball is under a bush or in another bad position and you decide you cannot play it, add a free kick.

Rules 29, 30, 31, 32: Other forms of play.

Threes, fours: Partners play alternately with one ball. If you play out of turn, you forfeit your hole in match play (or incur a two-stroke penalty in stroke play). Penalties do not change the order of the game. Three-ball, four-ball, best ball: Each player plays with his own ball. A player may play alone if his partner cannot be there. Partners can choose in which order to play.

Stableford is a type of stroke play that uses a scoring system rather than total strokes. It does not involve the need to put the ball into the hole on every hole.

On October 9, 2009, at the 121st IOC session in Copenhagen, golf was included in the program of the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

Many of the famous tennis players are also fond of golf, and after the end of their playing career, their number is increasing. For example, one of the tennis legends, Ivan Lendl, after his “retirement” tried to become a professional golfer and at 1994, 1996, he competed at the Czech Open, but both times he fell out of the race at the initial stage. He is a member of the "Royal Golf Club" in Marianske Lazne (Czech Republic). Lendl played tennis as a right-hander, but golf as a left-hander. It is interesting that the naturalized American introduced his three daughters not to tennis, but to golf. Yevgeny Kafelnikov, after finishing his professional tennis career in 2011, won the Russian Golf Championship. He is also the 1st Vice President and a member of the Presidium of the Russian Golf Association. Bob Falkenburg Wimbledon 19 winner48 ”, after the end of his tennis career, he became the triumphant of the Brazilian amateur championship three times, as well as many international tournaments. Good golfers: Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer, Tomas Berdych, Mardy Fish, James Blake, Tim Henman, Andy Roddick, Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Patrick Rafter, Scott Draper, Vitas Gerulaitis, Tim Gallickson, John McEnroe, Jimmy Connors, Rod Laver, Ellsworth Vines (professional) Among tennis players, there are also lovers of waving a stick. These are: Ana Ivanovich, Daniela Gantukhova, Caroline Wozniacki, Althea Gibson (professional), Lottie Dod. And the first of the eminent tennis players who successfully performed in golf was Mary Brown. After the end of her career, she was fond of golf and Beverly Baker-Flitz.

Roddick plays golf

Nadal and Djokovic are also good with golf clubs

More related materials: Games similar to tennis and its varieties

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Contents

  • Golf Terminology - A-B
  • Golf Terminology - G-M
  • Golf Terminology - P
  • Golf Terminology - R-C
  • How does it work?
  • What else do you need to know?
        • Brief History Holph
        • The Basics in Golf
        • Golf and Golf-Snowing Blows
        • Golf Thorns
        • Golf Rules
        • Golf-Etiquet
        • What is Gandirop?
        • So, if you are interested in golf, remember:

Golf Terminology - A-B

Iron, or piece of iron - a club with a flat hook. The standard composition of the irons in the set is number three through nine clubs, as well as a sand wedge and a pitching wedge.

Albatross, a term used for par 5 holes or more, means the number of shots on a hole that is three shots below par.

Birdie is the number of strokes taking place on a hole that is one less than its par.

Bogey is the number of shots that take place on a hole that is one more than its par.

Lateral water hazard - a hazard on a golf course, which is indicated by special red pegs.

A break is an artificial slope of the green that causes the ball to deviate slightly to one side when hit.

Bunker - a trap that complicates the player's task on the field, artificially created from sand. As a rule, bunkers are located near greens or in shipyards.

Bag - golfer's bag for storing clubs.

Collar, aka collar - a section that is cut above the green, but shorter than the fairway; located around the green.

Wood (wood) - a club with a large head. Traditionally, the larger it is, the shorter the club handle and the higher the angle of inclination of the striking surface of the head. A golfer's bag usually contains three woods - the first, which acts as a driver, as well as the third and fifth.

Golf Terminology - GM

Green - The area with the shortest grass around the hole.

Grip - covering the handle of a club, it can be rubber or leather.

Double (triple, quadruple) gods - strokes on one hole, the number of which is two (three, four) more than par.

Divot - a piece of turf knocked out upon impact.

Drive - a blow made by a driver.

Driver ("wood number one") - a club that has the smallest head tilt, and at the same time the longest handle, is used for the farthest shot.

Draw - A shot that shoots the ball straight ahead and then leans slightly to the left if the player is in a right-handed stance.

Eagle - Strokes on one hole that are two strokes less than par on that hole.

Car - vehicles for moving around the field, as a rule, a small car, it can be electric or gasoline.

Caddy - an assistant who carries golf clubs to the player, during the game he can prompt, give advice during the game.

Hole - 1) a hole into which a ball is driven; 2) one playing field, which includes the distance from the tee to the green.

Marker - 1) a circle that marks the position of the ball on the green; 2) the referee or scorer who counts the strokes.

Marshal - a person who monitors the speed of the players and compliance with the rules of etiquette.

Match - a type of game during which there is a competition between specific players, the result is calculated separately for each hole, and the one who wins the most holes wins.

Golf Terminology - P

Par - a conditional standard that is constantly used to calculate the results and evaluate the player's level. In other words, par is as many strokes as a golfer must make either on one hole, or, depending on the chosen rules, on the entire field, and with a successful game. In order to determine the pars of one hole, it is necessary that the distance from the tee to the green be no more than two hundred meters, that is, the player must hit the green with just one shot. In the event that the distance is not more than four hundred meters, then two blows. Well, if more, then three strokes should be used. When the ball hits the green, it can be considered that it hit the hole with two strokes. Pretty good result. After these steps, the first type of holes will be called "par 3", the second type - "par 4", the third type - "par 5". Keep in mind that the sum of the pars of all holes is the total par of the course (as a rule, for a standard course of 18 holes, it is equal to 72). Any player can score either higher or lower than a pair. Then his result - the number of points - will have a "+" or "-" sign. For example: a player on a hole, say, 150 meters long (and this is equal to "par 3") made, for example, 5 strokes, which means that his result is - "plus 2".

Putt is a rolling shot that is played on the green.

Putter - a special putt club.

PGA - Association of professional golfers, brings together instructors and golfers who constantly play in the Tour (professional tournaments). They exist in all countries, Russia is no exception.

Pitch - A high trajectory shot where the ball hardly rolls.

Pitching wedge - an iron stick that comes after No. 9 in the set.

An obstacle is any element on the playing field that is specially constructed or deliberately left on it in order to make it difficult to play.

An obstruction is an object that prevents a player from making a kick, it is something that should not be on the field, even according to the architect's intention. According to the rules, the player can remove the obstacle that prevents him, or move the ball to another point.

Professional Tour is a cycle of professional competitions that take place throughout the year. Golf is the only sport where there are several professional Tours. The largest - male - American. There are also European, and Australo-Asian. Women's - American and European type. There are also tours for young and old players. There are also various other tours: for example, for veterans or still too young players.

A straight water hazard is a hazard marked with yellow stakes.

A pool is a shot during which the ball flies to the left of the target.

A push is a hit when the ball flies to the right of the target.

Golf Terminology - R-Ch

Rough - a kind of area where tall grass grows, which is specially left on the side of the fairway. Naturally, a ball that hits the rough is much harder to hit.

Swing is a movement during which strokes are made with all clubs, except for the putter. It consists of several specific actions: retracting the club, the so-called swing, then moving down, then directly hitting and, finally, completion.

Slice - a type of strike during which the ball first flies straight, but then deviates significantly to the right - these actions are for a player with a right-handed stance.

Sand wedge is the name of the iron stick, it follows in the set immediately after the pitching wedge. Mainly used for kicking the ball out of bunkers.

Tee - 1) the name of the stand made of wood or plastic on which the ball is placed in order to make the first stroke, and at each hole; 2) the name of the site on the field - it is usually raised - it is from there that the game begins on each hole.

Fade - a blow during which the ball flies straight at first, but then slightly deviates to the right - these actions are for a player with a right-handed stance.

Fairway is the name given to a patch of medium length grass that occupies the majority of the playing field and is located between the tee and the green.

Hook - A hit during which the ball first goes straight, but then there is a significant deflection to the left - this is an action for a player with a right-handed stance.

Shenk - a blow that is made by the “heel” of the club, after which the ball most often flies to the side.

Chip - the name of a low short hit, after which the ball first rolls a relatively long distance; this stroke is applied during play in the immediate vicinity of the green itself.

What is your association with the word "golfer"? An elderly grey-haired gentleman with a cigar in his mouth and a typewriter? Yes, golf is surrounded by hundreds of stereotypes. You will be surprised, but in the British Isles everyone plays golf - men and women, young and old. What is the secret of such popularity?

The fact that British people familiar with the game since childhood see the game primarily as entertainment and a way to have a good time, and only then as a professional sport. All professional golfers started out in love with golf and enjoyed the game first and foremost. Many of them did not even think that their hobby would someday become a job and would bring them a lot of money.

Despite the seeming simplicity and relaxation, golf is a serious workout, during which all the muscles of the body are worked out properly. During a standard game of 18 holes, which lasts about four and a half hours, the player covers a distance of at least 10 km, and walking is considered one of the most balanced types of physical activity. Golf improves motor and cognitive skills, since during the game the golfer needs good coordination and eye, and it is also important after each stroke to quickly adapt to the new game situation. Also, in most sports, there comes a time when the years take their toll and it's time to sheath your racket or hang up your boots. In golf, there is even a special Senior Tour, where professionals or amateurs over 50 fight, continue to show decent results and enjoy the game. A huge advantage is that age is not a hindrance to golf.

How does it work?

Of course, in order to "get involved" in golf, there is nothing better than just seeing the game with your own eyes and immersing yourself in its atmosphere. However, if you have already decided to try it, you will probably be interested to know what rules the game is based on.

The object of the round is to hit the ball in each of the 9 or 18 holes in the least number of strokes. To do this, you have different types of clubs (a complete set includes up to 14 pieces). Here are their main types:

  • "Wood" is a club for hitting long distances. They usually start the game with the most long-range "Wood" No. 1, which is called the "Driver".
  • "Iron" - a club for a medium distance, most often a golfer has about 6 of them. They differ in length, degree of impact surface and number. The higher the number, the shorter and higher the stick hits.
  • "Wage" - stick for accurate short hits, as well as for knocking the ball out of the sand and tall grass. It features a heavy heel and a large impact surface angle.
  • "Putter" - with its help, golfers roll the final shot into the hole, which is carved on the shortest cut part of the field called the "green".

Golf ball - the fastest of all sports balls, a kind of sandwich made of hard rubber and a mixture of different types of plastic. The game is played on a specially designed outdoor field.

The rules of golf are based on the overriding principle - honesty. On the cover of the official edition of the rules, which is regularly updated, it says: "Play the ball as it lies, play the field as you find it, and if the above is not possible, do the right thing."

The rules of golf are international and apply to any club in the world where golf is officially played. Also, a golf club can supplement the basic golf rules with local ones, which are developed and approved by the administration of a particular Club, taking into account its specifics and game features. In addition to the official rules, there is the so-called golf etiquette.

While the rules regulate how to behave in certain situations on the field and how penalty points are awarded in case of violation of them, then etiquette regulates such aspects of the game as safety, fairness, speed of play and respect for other players and for the field. Etiquette imposes requirements both on the appearance of the players and on their behavior.

Penalty points in golf are awarded for violation of the rules or when the ball, after being hit, falls into a position that does not present opportunities for further play. For example, a ball that has flown out of the field is punished with a free kick, and the player is forced to make a third hit from the same place where he hit the ball into touch. When hitting someone else's ball, the player also receives a free kick and is forced to return and play his ball. Sometimes, for example, for a deliberate violation of the rules or cheating, a player may be disqualified.

Golf will help you discover harmony in yourself, learn to treat things philosophically, get the support and approval of others. In addition, you can play golf in the immediate vicinity of Moscow. What other arguments do you need?

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If you have just started learning golf and don't know the rules yet, don't worry! The practical minimum, along with club etiquette, is usually set out on the player's scorecard. But if your goal is not just participation, but a confident victory, you need to know the rules of golf by heart: penalties are awarded for mistakes, and in a match game you will have to give up the hole to the opposing side.

The essence of golf comes down to three basic principles:

Play the field as it is.
Play the ball as it lies.
And if neither is possible, do what is right.

There is a strict prohibition against changing the disposition of the ball before the impact, that is, you can not push, correct, part or crush the grass, bend or break branches of bushes. If the ball has flown into an obstacle course or into a ditch with water, the rules of golf allow you to touch the obstacles surrounding it with your body or club only at the moment of striking.

In stroke play, it is also a violation to hit the ball by another golfer who is already on the green. If the ball was moved by another participant in the game, the owner is recognized as having the right to correct it, but the referee and other golfers must be notified about this.

GOLF ACADEMY CLUBHOUSE

What else do you need to know?

Rules of Golf:

It is legal to handle the ball on the putting green.
It is permitted to remove the turf from the ball for play.
It is allowed to level potholes from completed holes and previously played balls (but only if they were left by you).
Traces left by opponents are forbidden by the rules of golf.
It is considered an extremely gross oversight if the ball hits the flag.
Penalties may apply for causing inconvenience to other golfers - for example, taking the line of play of one of the opponents at the moment when he is preparing to shoot.
Incorrect placement of the ball is also regarded as an attempt to unlawfully relieve oneself. The classic rules of golf require the ball to be placed strictly between the tee markers, without looking ahead. Some clubs allow the ball to be placed behind the tee-markers, but no more than two clubs long.
During the competition, to facilitate the keeping of scores, the rules of golf oblige participants to put identifying marks on the balls in advance. "No one's" ball is recognized as lost. If the ball is lost on the field or out of order, the player is given five minutes to replace, and sanctions are imposed for absent-mindedness.

Stop! You found what you were looking for! If you don't know anything about golf yet, a quick guide to golf for beginners will help you.

A Brief History of Golf

Golf originated 1000 years ago in China, but the modern version of this game originated in Scotland in the 1400s. The first official mention of golf was in 1457, when the Scottish Parliament banned the game, as it was a distraction from military training, which harmed the country's national security. Obviously, the Scots preferred the game of golf to the art of archery.

The modern game of golf and the first golf clubs appeared in Scotland. The first written rules of golf were also created there. The first tournaments with a well-thought-out concept were held between Scottish cities. Soon the game of golf spread throughout England, and then around the world. The oldest golf course is Old Links at Musselboro Racecourse.

Basic golf terms
  • Hole (hole) - 1 - one playing field from the tee to the green inclusive; 2 - a recess in the green into which the ball is driven.
  • Golf tee (golf tee) - 1 - a platform on the field, from where play begins on each hole; 2 - a stand made of wood or plastic on which a ball may be placed to make the first stroke of each hole.
  • Fairway - An area of ​​medium length grass covering the majority of the playing field between the tee and the green.
  • Green (green) - the area with the shortest soft grass immediately around the hole.
  • Rough (rough) - a "wild" area of ​​tall grass with trees, specially left on the sides of the fairway. A ball that hits the rough is much more difficult to knock out.
  • The bunker is a sand trap, specially made on the field to complicate the player's task. Bunkers may be located on fairways or near greens.
  • Barrier (hazard) - an element of the playing field, specially constructed or deliberately left on it (bunker, water barrier) to make it difficult to play.
  • Stroke (stroke) - swing (swing movement) with the intention of hitting the ball. You keep track of the score, but you count the strokes. You also need to remember that a miss on the ball can be considered a stroke.
  • Divot (divot) - a piece of turf, knocked out upon impact.
  • Clubhouse (clubhouse) - a building on the golf course, which usually combines administration offices, locker rooms, lounges, a bar, a restaurant for players and guests.
  • Driving range - a separate area for processing long shots.
  • Practice green / putting green (putting green) - an area with short - like on ordinary greens - grass, in which several holes are cut. It is located outside the playing field, usually near the driving range.

Scoring (account maintenance):

  • Ace (ace) / hole-in-one (hol-in-one) - hitting the hole from the first (one) hit.
  • Eagle - The number of strokes on one hole is 2 strokes lower than the par of that hole.
  • Birdie - the number of strokes on one hole is one less than par.
  • Par (par) is a conditional standard used to calculate the result and assess the level of players. Par is the number of strokes that a golfer must make on one hole or on the entire course in case of a successful game.
  • Bogey (bogey) - the number of shots on one hole is one more than par.
  • Double (triple, quadruple) bogey (double (triple, quadruple) bogey) - the number of strokes on one hole is two (three, four) more than par.
  • Handicap (handicap) - a figure indicating the level of skill of a golfer, calculated according to a rather complex system and allows you to equalize the chances of beginners and experienced athletes.
Golf clubs and golf equipment

Sure, good golf clubs and golf equipment will improve your game, but they don't make a big difference if you're new to golf. Your first golf clubs can get frayed, scratched, and even broken, so don't spend a fortune on a good set until you get the hang of it. Also, remember that there is always the possibility that you will not perform well in this sport.

Tip for beginners:

  • Borrow golf clubs from a friend;
  • Rent a set at a golf club;
  • Buy used golf clubs on EBay and similar sites;
  • Do not buy the complete set. For starters, the following types of clubs are suitable: wood, 2 or 3 irons, send or wage and putter.

It is also very important to take some golf lessons. Many note that golf is not intuitive at first, so you need to train your body so that the playing technique becomes natural for you. It is very important at this stage that the coach corrects the mistakes and gives appropriate recommendations.

In any case, golf lessons with a professional are much better than any golf manual.

Golf tournaments

If you are really starting to play sports, you will most likely discover watching tournaments on TV, perhaps even attending some of them in person.

The main well-known professional golf tournaments are listed below with a brief description of them:

- Four Majors - an annual series of the four most prestigious tournaments in men's professional golf:

  • Masters Tournaments are held every year at the beginning of April at the Augusta National Golf Club.
  • US Open (US Open) is held in mid-June at various fields in the USA.
  • The Open takes place in mid-July at various golf courses in England and Ireland. The tournament is also known as the British Open.
  • The
  • PGA Championship takes place in mid-August at various golf courses in the eastern United States.

- The Ryder Cup takes place at the end of September.

You can also visit or participate in amateur tournaments (if your handicap permits) to experience this fascinating unifying golf atmosphere.

The schedule and review of the brightest amateur golf tournaments in Russia can be found at www.putter-club.com.

Rules of Golf

There are few official documents in golf that govern the rules of golf. The main international golf rules approved by the sports association R&A Rules Limited (St. Andrews, Scotland) and the US Golf Association (Far Hills, New Jersey) can be found at www.randa.org, www.usga.org.

Golf etiquette

Golf is the most sophisticated sport where etiquette must be observed with the utmost care.

Here are some basic golf etiquette tips for beginner golfers:

  • Do not talk while hitting someone;
  • Do not go to another player's line of play;
  • Do not kick the ball if you see a group playing in front of you;
  • Don't get angry after every bad hit;
  • Don't be late/arrive on time;
  • Have fun.
What is a handicap?

The handicap is an indicator of the skill of a golfer, the lower it is, the stronger the player in front of you. Handicaps can be applied in any format of the game, but only among amateurs, there is no handicap system in professional golf.

The handicap is calculated according to certain rules based on the rounds played by the golfer, subject to certain requirements (qualifying rounds). The handicap system allows players of different levels to compete on an equal footing.

Most golf courses will not allow playing on a course without a handicap no higher than that set by a particular club.


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