How to prepare olives after picking from tree


How to Brine and Cure Your Own Olives

If you're lucky enough to have olive trees, you may have considered eating one of the fruits straight from the branch only to discover that there's a big difference between the olive on a tree and the olive on your plate. That's because the olives we enjoy are essentially pickles. Whether steeped in oil or a salt brine, olives only become truly edible after curing. The raw fruit is bursting with oleuropein, a bitter compound that must be removed prior to eating.

Of the various methods of curing, including oil-cured, water-cured, brine-cured, (salt) dry-cured, and lye-cured, the simplest for the novice are water-curing and brine-curing (which is essentially the same process as pickling). After the olives are cured they are placed in a pickling brine.

Illustration: Chelsea Damraksa. © The Spruce, 2019

Choosing the Cure Solution

Green olives, which are young, immature olives, can be cured in water, which removes the bitter taste of the raw fruit. They will have a fresh, nutty flavor and firm texture. After a week or so of water curing, they are stored in a pickling brine, which adds a salty flavor. Brine curing is a similar process, but instead of simple water, the olives sit for a week in a salt and water solution. This method can be used with green olives as well as ripe (purple or black) ones. No matter which kind of cure you select, the brining process is similar.

The longer the olive is permitted to ferment in its own brine, the less bitter and more intricate its flavor will become.

Selecting and Prepping the Olives

Different kinds of olives benefit from different cures. Manzanillo, mission, and kalamata olives are the best varieties for brining or salt curing. Larger fruits, such as Seville olives, may need to be steeped in lye to fully cure.

Lye-Cured Green Olives

First, select olives that haven't been bruised or succumbed to pests, in particular, the olive fly, whose larvae burrow into the fruits. Wash the olives thoroughly. Then slice or crack the olives, depending on how you would like them to look, to allow the brine to penetrate the fruit. Take care not to cut the pit.

Curing the Olives

Once you've decided between a water- or brine-cure, you are now ready to treat the olives. If using a water-cure process, place the prepared olives in a pan and cover with cold water; let sit for about a week, changing the water twice a day. Once the bitterness is gone, you are ready to place the olives in a brine.

For a brine-cure, place the prepared olives in a mixture of 1 part salt to 10 parts water, making sure they're submerged, and leave for 3 to 6 weeks, changing the brine every week and shaking the pan once a day.

Brining the Olives

Once the olives have been cured, they are ready to be put into the brine. Combine 1 part salt to 10 parts water and pour over the olives in a bowl or pot. Weigh them down with a plate and let sit for 1 week. Drain the olives and repeat the brining process for another week. Do this two more times so they brine for about a month or so.

Green olives are usually pitted, and often stuffed with various fillings, including pimentos, almonds, anchovies, jalapenos, onions, or capers. If you would like to have pitted and/or stuffed olives, remove the pits and add the fillings at this point. Then, mix up a similar brine, adding vinegar and herbs if desired. Store the olives in the brine in a jar and refrigerate. The olives will last up to a year this way.

How to Cure Olives in Salt Brine (Step by Step)

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At the end of autumn it is olive picking time in NZ. If you've got access to olives, preserving some is definitely the way to go. My favourite way to preserve them is through making salt brine cured olives. This post will show you how to cure olives in a salt brine.

Salty, flavourful little morsels that beat store-bought by a mile. Many store-bought olives are lye-cured which changes the real olive texture and taste.

Making your own cured olives feels like such an accomplishment. Tending to your olives, refreshing the brine, tasting and testing...

Once they're finished the taste will outweigh the effort spent on the brining. If you have an olive tree (or a few) on your property you'll know how abundantly they can produce. Unless you're planning on pressing for oil, in which case you'll usually need 50kg minimum, there's not much else to do with olives except for curing them.

Picking the Olives

The process for cured olives takes patience but the effort involved is not difficult. Start by picking your olives. Choose the darkest, fattest olives that are unblemished.

If you squeeze one, it should release a milky liquid if it's ready to brine.

Once you have your selection, if you have a real difference in colours, you can sort the greener ones away from the black ones. This is because the green ones are less mature and will need a little longer to brine and lose their bitterness.

Washing the Olives

Once your olives are sorted, wash them well and remove any really damaged olives you missed while picking. A little bird pecked is fine, but if they are starting to rot then take those out.

The same goes for any dry and shrivelled looking olives. You want them as plump and damaged free as possible.

Slitting and Soaking the Olives

Now here's the bit that will determine how long your cured olives will take. You can choose now to slit your olives, or leave them whole. Slitting each olive will allow the water and salt to penetrate it faster and remove the bitterness.

If you leave them whole, they'll need to sit in a brine a lot longer.

To slit the olives, use a sharp knife to cut a little slit into each olive. Alternatively, you can carefully 'crush' your olives with a heavy object such as a meat tenderiser or a flat stone. Crush them enough to just break the skin but not to completely flatten the olives.

Now, give them an initial soak in plain water for a 2-3 days, changing the water daily. Keep the olives completely submerged in the water (use a plate or weight to hold them under).

How To Cure Olives

After soaking in water, it is time to soak your olives in brine. You can make a simple brine solution using a ratio of 1 parts salt to 10 parts water. Use an unprocessed salt such as rock salt or sea salt.

Cover the olives with the brine in a bucket, jar or container with a lid. Make sure the olives are again completely submerged. I put mine in a bucket and an upside down plate works to hold them down. Loosely seal the jar or container with a lid. You may need to open it every couple of days for the first week to release some of the gases. Alternatively an airlock can be used.

If you have slit or crushed your olives, they may only need to sit in brine for 1-2 months depending on taste. If you have left them whole they can sit in brine for 6 months or longer.

Changing The Olive Brine

Check the olives weekly to see if the brine needs changing.

How often you change the brine is dependant on the environment and how quickly you want them to be ready. If the olives stay submerged and there is no sign of mould, the brine doesn't need to be changed. If mould is growing, tip the brine out, rinse the olives really well and make fresh brine.

Changing the brine weekly will leach out the bitterness faster.

Taste your olives after a month or so. If they are still too bitter, keep soaking them until you are happy.

Bottling the Olives

Once the bitterness has gone, it is time to jar up your olives in sterilised jars.

My vinegar brine is at a ratio of 2:5:20, salt, vinegar, water. For example, 40g salt, 100g vinegar and 400g water makes about half a litre of vinegar/salt brine.

Cover the olives with the vinegar brine and flavourings. Ensure the olives are submerged under the brine. Pour over a thick layer of olive oil which will stop oxygen touching the olives. Screw the lid on the jars, and let them sit for a week to infuse the newly added flavours before sampling.

Olives like this can store in a sealed jar for up 6 months in a cool dark place, or in the refrigerator for up to a year. Once opened (meaning, once the olives are no longer kept under the olive oil), use within 3 weeks. Try them on focaccia bread! Here's a sourdough version too.

Happy curing!

Ingredients

  • Olives
  • Uniodized salt
  • Water
  • Apple cider vinegar
  • Flavourings (lemon, garlic, herbs, chili..)

Instructions

  1. Pick your olives, choosing the fattest, darkest olives. Squeezing an olive should release a milky liquid if it's ripe enough to brine.
  2. Once picked, if you have a real difference in colours, sort the green ones away from the black ones. The green ones are less mature and will need a little longer to brine and lose their bitterness.
  3. Wash them well and remove any really damaged olives and dry shrivelled olives.
  4. You can choose now to slit your olives, or leave them whole. Slitting each olive will allow the water and salt to penetrate it faster and remove the bitterness. If you leave them whole, they'll need to sit in a brine a lot longer.
  5. To slit the olives, use a sharp knife to cut a little slit into each olive. Alternatively, you can carefully 'crush' your olives with a heavy object such as a meat tenderiser or a flat stone. Crush them enough to just break the skin but not to completely flatten the olives.
  6. Now, give them an initial soak in plain water for a 2 days, changing the water each day. Keep the olives completely submerged in the water (use a plate or weight to hold them under).
  7. Now soak the olives in brine using a ratio of 1 parts uniodized salt to 10 parts water, measured in weight.
  8. Cover the olives with the brine , making sure the olives are again completely submerged. Loosely seal the jar or container with a lid. You will need to open it every couple of days to release some of the gases if the lid is on tightly.
  9. If you have slit or crushed your olives, they will only need to sit in brine for 3-6 weeks depending on taste. If you have left them whole they can sit in brine for up to 6 months or longer.
  10. How often you change the brine is dependant on your environment and how quickly they cure. Changing the brine weekly will leach the bitterness out faster, but if the olives stay submerged and there is no sign of mould, the brine doesn't need to be changed as often. This will slow down the process though.
  11. If mould is growing, tip the brine out, rinse the olives well and clean the olive container and make fresh brine.
  12. Remove the lid and check the olives weekly.
  13. Taste them after a month or two. If they are still too bitter, keep soaking them until you are happy with it.
  14. Once the bitterness has gone, it is time to jar up your olives in sterilised jars.
  15. I use a vinegar brine, at a ratio of 2:5:40 salt, vinegar, water. For example, 40g salt, 100g vinegar and 400g water makes about half a litre of vinegar/salt brine.
  16. Add in any other flavourings you like such as lemon, lime, garlic, oregano, rosemary, chilli.
  17. Cover the olives with the vinegar brine and flavourings. Ensure the olives are submerged under the brine. Pour over a thick layer of olive oil which will stop oxygen touching the olives. Screw the lid on the jars, and let them sit for a week to infuse the newly added flavours before sampling.
  18. Olives can store in a sealed jar for up 6 months in a cool dark place, or in the refrigerator for up to a year. Once opened keep in the fridge and use within 3 weeks.

Nutrition Information:
Serving Size: 1 grams
Amount Per Serving: Unsaturated Fat: 0g

90,000 olives (olives) of their own preparation, step -by -step recipe for 3468 kcal, photo, ingredients

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Svetlana Metaxa

1 month, 2 weeks and 6 days and 6 days and 6 weeks and 6 days and 6 days and 6 days and 6 days and 6 days and 6 days and 6 days and 6 days and 6 days and 6 days and 6 days and 6 days

Recipe for:

15 pers. According to legend, in a dispute between Athena and Poseidon over the possession of Attica, Athena won due to the fact that she gave the Greeks an olive. Grateful Greeks from that very moment began to grow this beautiful tree.

Nowadays olive trees grow everywhere in Greece and it is hard to imagine Greek cuisine without this product. Olives (olives) are very useful and tasty. But in order for them to be eaten, they must be pre-processed to get rid of bitterness. In order to get rid of bitterness and at the same time retain useful properties, they are salted.

There are several ways to cook olives. I offer one of them.

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Ingredients for

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9005 900,000

5 g

wine vinegar

6 tbsp. l.

olives

3 kg

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To prepare olives at home, we need coarse salt, water and wine vinegar, if desired, spices, lemon juice.


Select fresh olives (olives) by size and degree of maturity, remove bad berries, stems. Rinse well and several times in cold water. On each olive, make a couple of cuts on the side. We make incisions so that the bitterness goes away as quickly as possible, otherwise it will take much longer to soak.


After that pour olives with cold water and change it every day, preferably 2 times a day. Repeat this for 10 days. Then, changing the water again, add salt to it and leave it for 5-10 days, but ideally for a month. We check the salt solution for the sufficiency of salt by putting an egg in it, if the egg floats, then there is enough salt. Change the saline solution every 2 days.


Drain the brine, fill the olives with clean cold water, add wine vinegar and leave for 3 days. Then drain the brine.


At the end, put the olives in glass jars (800 gr), compacting a little, add 1 tbsp. l. salt, a third of a glass of wine vinegar, a third of a glass of olive oil, you can spices to taste, chopped garlic, herbs, lemon.


Serve olives with olive oil.


And enjoy!


Olives are healthy and tasty! They can be added to salads, used in baking or eaten just like that!


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How are bad olives - Greek olive

Live olives - what is it?

Olives in iron cans: is there any taste and benefit?

Do you remember how, 15 years ago, we rushed into the mind-blowing huge supermarkets with burning eyes and saw stacks of cans with treasured food that we had never even tasted? Yes, how long ago it was. .. We indiscriminately grabbed foreign products and happily crushed them on both cheeks. Since then, our "consumer basket", let's be honest, has changed a lot. We have become more choosy, more whimsical, we have instilled in ourselves a taste brought from far abroad. Many fine restaurants have appeared in the capital. All this has nurtured in us a culture of consumption that corresponds to a high-quality and dignified lifestyle.

But there are products that millions of Russians put into their shopping carts in the old fashioned way while in the supermarket. It is curious that among such products that are “automatically” swept off the shelves, it is olives in a jar that are in the lead. Unfortunately, only a very few people know that the habit of buying olives in cans with an almost unlimited shelf life can turn out to be very deplorable for them.

Let's see what retail chains and other grocery stores offer us.

First of all, you see on the shelf a clear simple distinction: the store sells either green olives or black - there is no third. And if it is said that olives are black, then they will be blue-black, there is no blacker, as it is written on the bank.

Another distinction is whether olives are pitted or unpitted.

In addition, there is another criterion for distinguishing olives: by caliber, but even here there are two options: either large or ordinary size.

Reading the composition of these jars of olives, you will soon get bored, because you will not find any differences between all the possible options for store-bought olives. The difference can only be in a modest choice of “fillers” - as a rule, manufacturers love the removed bone, as if apologizing for the seemingly “pale” taste of the fruit, to replace it with lemon, tuna, almonds, sweet pepper, seafood.

Producers of olives from cans are not wiser with taste, counting on the most ignorant and unpretentious segment of the population: no matter what producer of olives you buy, having tried at least everything, you will not feel the difference. The "favorite" brand can be chosen only on the basis of the degree of tenderness of the pulp. The country of origin of the olives will also not affect the taste of the fruit, although you can choose olives from Tunisia, Morocco or Spain.

Poor taste sensations are far from the worst thing, although we stand up for a tasty life. The most important thing is that such olives not only do not contribute to the improvement of your body, but also harm your health. And this is due to the hasty desire of manufacturers to make money, and as soon as possible.

How are bad olives made?

In fact, it takes 15 years for an olive tree to grow to the age when it begins to bear fruit. Harvested olives must be soaked in brine for about six months before serving them on the table. Due to their natural bitterness, fresh olives cannot be eaten. However, cunning merchants have come up with a way to sell you olives just a few weeks after the harvest. True, in this case, you will get a product that is practically devoid of taste and benefit.

Harvested green olives are placed by unscrupulous producers in an alkaline solution - caustic soda and kept for seven days. During this time, all the beneficial substances that nature has put into this fruit are washed out with soda - only empty fiber remains.

After that, the olives are washed and settled in clean water, periodically enriching the solution with olives with oxygen - so that the fruits acquire a ripe, dark color. Such olives prepared in a "quick" way are called "oxidized" . After that, a color stabilizer is added (so that black olives do not turn back into green) - ferrous gluconate (E579), taste stabilizers - lactic and citric acids, which allow you to extend the shelf life of olives up to 3 years instead of the usual 6 months, and monosodium glutamate (E621) - flavor enhancer. And, finally, olives are pasteurized or sterilized - for this, the fruits are heated for 15-30 minutes at a temperature of 80-120 degrees. Green olives from iron cans are prepared in the same way, excluding the oxidation process.


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