How to treat rash caused by tea tree oil


On Your Skin and Inhalation

Tea tree oil is a type of essential oil that comes from the leaves of the Australian tea tree. It has several health-related benefits, including antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities.

Tea tree oil can be used to help treat a variety of conditions, particularly issues related to the skin. It can also be found as an ingredient in some cosmetic and cleaning products.

Even though tea tree oil is generally well-tolerated, there are some potential side effects to know about. Continue reading as we explore tea tree oil, its side effects, and how to use it safely.

While research suggests there are health benefits, the FDA doesn’t monitor or regulate the purity or quality of essential oils. It’s important to talk with a healthcare professional before you begin using essential oils and be sure to research the quality of a brand’s products. Always do a patch test before trying a new essential oil.

While research suggests there are health benefits, the FDA doesn’t monitor or regulate the purity or quality of essential oils. It’s important to talk with a healthcare professional before you begin using essential oils and be sure to research the quality of a brand’s products. Always do a patch test before trying a new essential oil.

Research into the benefits of tea tree oil is ongoing. Based on what’s currently known about tea tree oil, it’s sometimes used as a natural treatment for certain health conditions, such as:

  • skin conditions, including acne, athlete’s foot, and dandruff
  • head lice and scabies
  • cuts, burns, and insect bites
  • respiratory symptoms, such as cough and congestion

Tea tree oil is also used in many cosmetic products, such as shampoos, lotions, and soaps. Additionally, it can be included as an ingredient in some household cleaning products.

The possible side effects of tea tree oil depend on how it’s used. The most popular ways to use the oil are by applying it to the skin (topical application) or by inhaling it (aromatherapy).

Side effects from topical applications

Applying tea tree oil to the skin can cause irritation, particularly if it’s not diluted properly and is used in higher concentrations. Symptoms of skin irritation from tea tree oil can include:

  • redness
  • dry or scaly skin
  • itching
  • burning
  • stinging

Some people may develop an allergic reaction to tea tree oil. This is called allergic contact dermatitis and can cause a skin rash that may be red, swollen, and itchy. Use of older or improperly stored tea tree oil is often associated with these reactions, but fresh tea tree oil can cause this skin reaction, too.

A 2007 study found that abnormal breast growth coincided with tea tree and lavender oil use in a young boy who had been regularly using hair products containing both oils. The condition resolved after he stopped using the products.

Side effects from inhalation

Tea tree oil can also be used for aromatherapy. With this method, the oil is inhaled by using a diffuser, or through steam inhalation. Breathing in too much tea tree oil, or inhaling it for too long may lead to symptoms like:

  • headache
  • nausea
  • vertigo

Side effects from internal applications

Tea tree oil should never be used internally. It can be toxic and potentially fatal if you ingest it. If swallowed, symptoms may include:

  • drowsiness
  • confusion
  • uncoordinated movement (ataxia)
  • loss of consciousness

Tea tree oil is toxic if swallowed. That’s why it should be kept in a safe place where children and pets can’t get to the oil and won’t be tempted to swallow it.

Side effects in children

Case reports of tea tree oil poisoning from 1994, 1995, and 2003 occurred in children who swallowed the oil. In these cases, the children recovered following emergency care at a hospital.

The symptoms of tea tree oil poisoning in children are similar to those in adults. They can include symptoms like:

  • feeling sleepy or drowsy
  • uncoordinated movement (ataxia)
  • confusion
  • unresponsiveness or loss of consciousness

Side effects in pets

Toxicity in pets has been reported not only when tea tree oil is ingested, but also when it’s applied topically.

One study reviewed incidents of exposure to 100 percent tea tree oil in cats and dogs over a 10-year period. Researchers found that in 89 percent of cases, tea tree oil was applied intentionally to the animals and not ingested accidentally.

The common symptoms of tea tree oil poisoning in dogs and cats can include:

  • increased drooling
  • extreme fatigue
  • muscle weakness
  • tremors
  • uncoordinated movement (ataxia)

Following essential oil safety guidelines may help reduce the risk of developing side effects. Some tips include:

  • Never consume or ingest tea tree oil.
  • Keep tea tree oil in a place that’s well out of reach of children and pets.
  • Never apply undiluted tea tree oil to your skin. According to the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA), essential oils that are used topically should be diluted in carrier oils, creams, or lotions, typically between a 1 and 5 percent dilution.
  • Dilute tea tree oil more if you have sensitive skin or are applying tea tree oil to a child’s skin. NAHA recommends a 0.5 to 2.5 percent dilution.
  • If you’re concerned about a potential skin reaction, test a little bit of diluted tea tree oil on your skin before using it on a larger area.
  • If you plan to use tea tree oil for aromatherapy, be sure the space you’re in is well ventilated. Avoid prolonged exposure to tea tree oil fumes.
  • Store tea tree oil in a dark bottle, as exposure to light can damage it.

Avoid using tea tree oil if you have eczema, as it could make your condition worse. Also, use caution with inhaling the oil if you have asthma, as it may worsen your symptoms.

Generally speaking, it’s a good rule of thumb to consult your doctor if you’re considering using tea tree oil but have questions or concerns. This is particularly true if you:

  • are pregnant
  • are breastfeeding
  • take prescription medications
  • have an underlying health condition

If you develop a skin irritation or allergic contact dermatitis after using tea tree oil, discontinue use. See your doctor if you have a skin reaction to tea tree oil that’s severe or affects a large area of your body.

Seek emergency care if you or someone else has swallowed tea tree oil or is experiencing signs of anaphylaxis in response to tea tree oil. Symptoms of anaphylaxis include:

  • wheezing or coughing
  • swelling of the throat or face
  • trouble breathing or swallowing
  • anxiety or confusion

Tea tree oil is an essential oil that can be used to help treat various conditions, including acne, athlete’s foot, and dandruff. It can also be found in some cosmetic and cleaning products.

There are several potential side effects of tea tree oil, including skin irritation and allergic contact dermatitis. Tea tree oil is toxic when ingested and should never be taken internally.

When using tea tree oil, be sure to follow essential oil safety guidelines. This includes diluting the oil properly before applying it to your skin, and not inhaling it for long periods of time. If you have health-related questions or concerns, consult your doctor before using tea tree oil.

On Your Skin and Inhalation

Tea tree oil is a type of essential oil that comes from the leaves of the Australian tea tree. It has several health-related benefits, including antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities.

Tea tree oil can be used to help treat a variety of conditions, particularly issues related to the skin. It can also be found as an ingredient in some cosmetic and cleaning products.

Even though tea tree oil is generally well-tolerated, there are some potential side effects to know about. Continue reading as we explore tea tree oil, its side effects, and how to use it safely.

While research suggests there are health benefits, the FDA doesn’t monitor or regulate the purity or quality of essential oils. It’s important to talk with a healthcare professional before you begin using essential oils and be sure to research the quality of a brand’s products. Always do a patch test before trying a new essential oil.

While research suggests there are health benefits, the FDA doesn’t monitor or regulate the purity or quality of essential oils. It’s important to talk with a healthcare professional before you begin using essential oils and be sure to research the quality of a brand’s products. Always do a patch test before trying a new essential oil.

Research into the benefits of tea tree oil is ongoing. Based on what’s currently known about tea tree oil, it’s sometimes used as a natural treatment for certain health conditions, such as:

  • skin conditions, including acne, athlete’s foot, and dandruff
  • head lice and scabies
  • cuts, burns, and insect bites
  • respiratory symptoms, such as cough and congestion

Tea tree oil is also used in many cosmetic products, such as shampoos, lotions, and soaps. Additionally, it can be included as an ingredient in some household cleaning products.

The possible side effects of tea tree oil depend on how it’s used. The most popular ways to use the oil are by applying it to the skin (topical application) or by inhaling it (aromatherapy).

Side effects from topical applications

Applying tea tree oil to the skin can cause irritation, particularly if it’s not diluted properly and is used in higher concentrations. Symptoms of skin irritation from tea tree oil can include:

  • redness
  • dry or scaly skin
  • itching
  • burning
  • stinging

Some people may develop an allergic reaction to tea tree oil. This is called allergic contact dermatitis and can cause a skin rash that may be red, swollen, and itchy. Use of older or improperly stored tea tree oil is often associated with these reactions, but fresh tea tree oil can cause this skin reaction, too.

A 2007 study found that abnormal breast growth coincided with tea tree and lavender oil use in a young boy who had been regularly using hair products containing both oils. The condition resolved after he stopped using the products.

Side effects from inhalation

Tea tree oil can also be used for aromatherapy. With this method, the oil is inhaled by using a diffuser, or through steam inhalation. Breathing in too much tea tree oil, or inhaling it for too long may lead to symptoms like:

  • headache
  • nausea
  • vertigo

Side effects from internal applications

Tea tree oil should never be used internally. It can be toxic and potentially fatal if you ingest it. If swallowed, symptoms may include:

  • drowsiness
  • confusion
  • uncoordinated movement (ataxia)
  • loss of consciousness

Tea tree oil is toxic if swallowed. That’s why it should be kept in a safe place where children and pets can’t get to the oil and won’t be tempted to swallow it.

Side effects in children

Case reports of tea tree oil poisoning from 1994, 1995, and 2003 occurred in children who swallowed the oil. In these cases, the children recovered following emergency care at a hospital.

The symptoms of tea tree oil poisoning in children are similar to those in adults. They can include symptoms like:

  • feeling sleepy or drowsy
  • uncoordinated movement (ataxia)
  • confusion
  • unresponsiveness or loss of consciousness

Side effects in pets

Toxicity in pets has been reported not only when tea tree oil is ingested, but also when it’s applied topically.

One study reviewed incidents of exposure to 100 percent tea tree oil in cats and dogs over a 10-year period. Researchers found that in 89 percent of cases, tea tree oil was applied intentionally to the animals and not ingested accidentally.

The common symptoms of tea tree oil poisoning in dogs and cats can include:

  • increased drooling
  • extreme fatigue
  • muscle weakness
  • tremors
  • uncoordinated movement (ataxia)

Following essential oil safety guidelines may help reduce the risk of developing side effects. Some tips include:

  • Never consume or ingest tea tree oil.
  • Keep tea tree oil in a place that’s well out of reach of children and pets.
  • Never apply undiluted tea tree oil to your skin. According to the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA), essential oils that are used topically should be diluted in carrier oils, creams, or lotions, typically between a 1 and 5 percent dilution.
  • Dilute tea tree oil more if you have sensitive skin or are applying tea tree oil to a child’s skin. NAHA recommends a 0.5 to 2.5 percent dilution.
  • If you’re concerned about a potential skin reaction, test a little bit of diluted tea tree oil on your skin before using it on a larger area.
  • If you plan to use tea tree oil for aromatherapy, be sure the space you’re in is well ventilated. Avoid prolonged exposure to tea tree oil fumes.
  • Store tea tree oil in a dark bottle, as exposure to light can damage it.

Avoid using tea tree oil if you have eczema, as it could make your condition worse. Also, use caution with inhaling the oil if you have asthma, as it may worsen your symptoms.

Generally speaking, it’s a good rule of thumb to consult your doctor if you’re considering using tea tree oil but have questions or concerns. This is particularly true if you:

  • are pregnant
  • are breastfeeding
  • take prescription medications
  • have an underlying health condition

If you develop a skin irritation or allergic contact dermatitis after using tea tree oil, discontinue use. See your doctor if you have a skin reaction to tea tree oil that’s severe or affects a large area of your body.

Seek emergency care if you or someone else has swallowed tea tree oil or is experiencing signs of anaphylaxis in response to tea tree oil. Symptoms of anaphylaxis include:

  • wheezing or coughing
  • swelling of the throat or face
  • trouble breathing or swallowing
  • anxiety or confusion

Tea tree oil is an essential oil that can be used to help treat various conditions, including acne, athlete’s foot, and dandruff. It can also be found in some cosmetic and cleaning products.

There are several potential side effects of tea tree oil, including skin irritation and allergic contact dermatitis. Tea tree oil is toxic when ingested and should never be taken internally.

When using tea tree oil, be sure to follow essential oil safety guidelines. This includes diluting the oil properly before applying it to your skin, and not inhaling it for long periods of time. If you have health-related questions or concerns, consult your doctor before using tea tree oil.

What properties of tea tree oil give it its ability to treat acne?

There are many cosmetic preparations on the market for acne and other skin rashes. But often their use does not bring the desired effect, and sometimes it exacerbates the situation. The fact is that some products contain components of artificial origin, which have a detrimental effect on the skin.

One of the most gentle ways to get rid of rashes on the face is therapy with tea tree essential oil. After using this product, the skin of the face acquires a well-groomed appearance. Let's consider its properties.

The healing properties of tea tree oil

Oil eliminates diseases provoked by too active work of the sebaceous glands. Hormonal failure, stress, malnutrition, diseases of the liver and intestines, bad habits - all these are the causes of acne. Such prerequisites lead to the formation of black spots, acne, acne.

Sebum production is a natural process that occurs in the skin. But if an excess of fat is formed, clogging of the pores occurs. Microparticles of dirt, dust clog them and promote the growth of bacteria that cause acne.

You can fight rashes at home. Tea tree oil helps with this.

The oil is extracted from the foliage of a plant called Melaleuca alternifolia which grows in Australia. It is pale yellow or transparent in color.

Tea tree essential oil is part of the Siberian Wellness universal antiseptic agent from the Siberian Balsams collection - Elbeshen Floraseptic Balm. natural for 96% herbal product for external use combines the activity of a "pharmacy" antiseptic and natural floraseptics in the form of essential oils and Macleia extract.


Therapeutic effect

When tea tree oil is applied to the affected area, the pores open and the process of cleansing and disinfecting them takes place. The product is able to cope with various bacteria. It acts as an antiseptic and has a healing effect on the skin.

The effects of the drug:

  • antifungal;
  • antibacterial;
  • antiseptic;
  • antiviral.
Attention! The oil has really wonderful properties, but it is highly concentrated, which is why it is suitable only for external use. Before use, individual sensitivity to it should be tested: drop on the back of the elbow and wait 20 minutes. If there is no redness, burning and itching, then you can use the oil. .

It is preferable not to use the oil in its pure form, but to dilute it in water, neutral oils, cosmetics.

Methods of use

1 recipe:

  1. Dilute 4 drops of product in ½ cup of hot water.
  2. Use a clean cotton pad to apply the mixture to problem areas. The exposure period is 20 minutes.
  3. After drying, apply a moisturizing cosmetic to the skin. Washing off the mixture is not recommended.

Helpful Hints:

  • Cleanse the face before applying the oil;
  • slight burning - the usual effect of the drug;
  • The required amount of oil depends on the type of skin;
  • if there is a desire to speed up the achievement of the result, you can carry out the procedure twice a day.

2 recipe (more popular):

  1. Take 1-2 tablespoons of aloe vera gel and add 3 drops of oil.
  2. Stir the mixture, spread over the entire face, avoiding areas around the eyes, or apply to certain areas.
  3. Wait for the mask to dry and absorb. Then wash it off with warm water.
  4. Apply moisturizing lotion to the skin.

3 recipe:

  1. You will need oil, water and some green clay.
  2. Pour 1 or 2 tablespoons of clay into a small container, add 4 drops of the product, pour in water until a paste-like mass is obtained.
  3. The mask is applied to the most problematic areas of the face.
  4. Allow the mask to dry, then rinse off with warm water.
  5. The skin is then treated with a moisturizer.

As a moisturizer, a moisturizing foam cleanser can work well. Light gentle foam with aloe hop and lactic acid gently cleanses, soothes and moisturizes the skin, helps to make it smooth and even, and also prevents the appearance of black spots.


Helpful Hints:

  • tingling sensation is normal for this formulation;
  • green clay has the ability to purify the skin.

Green and china clay, as well as tea tree oil contains Mattifying face mask from a series of cosmetics with the ENDEMIX ™ complex. Two types of clay mattify the skin throughout the day, effectively remove impurities from the surface of the skin, help cleanse pores, and the complex of natural essential oils has an anti-inflammatory effect and has an aromatherapeutic effect.

Tea tree oil is an effective acne treatment, but don't wait until the next day for results. Much depends on the type of skin. In any case, it is better to first consult a dermatologist or cosmetologist.

Acne aromatherapy

Aromatherapy is treatment with scents. In addition to the local effect from the use of oils, there is also a systemic effect that occurs through the olfactory center.

With systemic action, odors are perceived by receptors in the upper nasal passages. Impulses are transmitted to the olfactory center of the cerebral cortex, which is located in the region of the temporal lobes. Different smells cause different reactions: spicy, bright smells excite the nervous system, fresh, moist smells soothe. It is known that with acne, the psycho-emotional state of patients is extremely unbalanced, long-term treatment causes stress, negative emotions can provoke an exacerbation of the disease or spontaneous refusal of treatment, as a result, a vicious circle is obtained. In addition, essential oils can help a beautician to obtain an antiseptic and sebum-regulating effect without the use of aggressive substances. Aromatherapy uses complex combinations of essential oils, which makes it possible to select individual compositions based on the needs of the skin and the personality of the patient. Of course, aromatherapy is a technique that requires deep study, because the proportions, properties, synergism and antagonism of essential oils in aromatherapy are the determining factors.

Essential oils are practically harmless if you follow the rules of selection and dilute them in natural and high-quality base oil.

Essential oil Properties Use of
in dermatocosmetology
Side effects
Bergamot Antiseptic, bactericidal, deodorant, analgesic, antispasmodic Eliminates irritation and inflammation, dries up herpetic pustules, normalizes the secretion of sweat and sebaceous glands, tightens pores, brightens age spots Photosensitizing effect
Ginger Antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, decongestant Enhances blood circulation, effective for acne, promotes wound healing, accelerates the resorption of hematomas Do not take on an empty stomach, may cause skin irritation when applied to the skin, do not use in children under seven years of age
Ylang Ylang Antidepressant, relieves emotional stress, headaches, high blood pressure Effective for oily skin with acne, porous and sensitive skin, moisturizes and smoothes the skin, promotes tanning Causes a slight tingling sensation when applied to the skin, do not use in children under 12 years of age
Cypress Antiseptic, antispasmodic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, expectorant, diuretic Normalizes the functioning of the sebaceous glands, is used to care for sensitive skin, helps to eliminate warts, reduces sweating, and prevents hair loss. Irritant action. Contraindications: pregnancy, mastopathy, thrombophlebitis, increased skin clotting
Cedar Antiseptic, antiviral, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, expectorant, diuretic, stimulates blood circulation Effective for acne, dermatosis, hair loss, prevents the formation of dandruff, rejuvenates the skin, improves elasticity Irritation may occur. Contraindications: pregnancy, irritability, epilepsy
Coriander Bile and diuretic, antiseptic, analgesic, mucolytic, antioxidant, lowers blood sugar For skin care prone to inflammatory processes, pustular rashes Do not use during pregnancy, thrombophlebitis
Lavender Antiseptic, wound healing, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, choleretic, stimulates the kidneys, lowers blood pressure Eliminates redness, itching, peeling, inflammatory reactions, has a refreshing and regenerating effect on the skin Joint use with iodine- and iron-containing drugs is not recommended
Juniper Bactericidal, antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, expectorant, diuretic, decongestant, stimulates the central nervous system Eliminates acne, prevents the formation of coarse scar tissue, effective in allergic dermatitis, improves skin elasticity, promotes skin cell regeneration Contraindications: pregnancy, kidney disease
Mirra Wound healing, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal It has an anti-inflammatory effect, promotes the resorption of fresh scars, refreshes and tightens the skin Contraindications: pregnancy. In high concentrations - toxic
Myrtle Antiseptic, astringent, bactericidal, sedative Eliminates comedones, acne, infiltrates, increases local immunity
Melissa Antihistamine, antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, immunostimulating, decongestant Eliminates pustular rash, infiltrates, normalizes the function of the sebaceous glands, effective for insect bites, eczema
Mint Antiseptic, analgesic, bactericidal, antioxidant, healing, expectorant, tonic Promotes the elimination of acne, reduces the manifestations of rosacea, increases local immunity allergic reactions
Rosemary Antiseptic, bactericidal, antioxidant, immunostimulating, choleretic, antispasmodic, hypertensive Effective for infected wounds, abscesses, normalizes the secretion of sebaceous glands, promotes narrowing of pores, promotes resorption of scars, stimulates hair growth Contraindications: pregnancy, epilepsy, hypertension
Sandal Antiseptic, antispasmodic, bactericidal, antidepressant, hypotensive, diuretic, deodorant Relieves inflammation, reduces inflammation in acne, tones, moisturizes Contraindications: kidney disease in the acute stage
Tea Tree Antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, immunostimulating Eliminates acne rashes, has a regenerating effect on tissues, is used for pediculosis, for the prevention of fungal diseases
Eucalyptus Antiseptic, antiviral, antispasmodic, analgesic, expectorant, healing, balsamic Eliminates acne rashes, promotes healing with herpetic eruptions, is effective for furunculosis, anesthetizes the skin after burns, frostbite Contraindications: pregnancy, individual intolerance

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