How to worship bilva tree


The Bilva Tree - The Divine Embodiment of Lord Shiva -

Maha Shivaratri is considered the most auspicious time to please Lord Shiva to gain his blessings. What is the simplest way of appeasing Lord Shiva? Offer him Bilva leaves.

The most terrible karma is destroyed when a Bilva leaf is offered to Lord Shiva. The unbelievable merits one receives on offering a single Bilva leaf to Lord Shiva are described in the 9 verses of the sacred hymn known as Bilvashtakam.

Glory of the Bilva Tree

Scientific Name – Aegle Mermelos
English Name – Golden Apple/ Stone Apple

Just like Tulsi plant is sacred to Lord Krishna and Durva grass is sacred to Lord Ganesha, Bilva tree is sacred to Lord Shiva. Since the Bilva leaf has such significance in the worship of Lord Shiva, it is common to find Bilva trees cultivated in the vicinity of Shiva temples.

According to Shiva Purana, the great epic on Lord Shiva, the Bilva tree is the manifest form of Lord Shiva himself, while all the great tirthas (pilgrimage places) are said to reside at its base. One who worships the Shiva Linga while sitting under the Bilva tree attains the highest bliss of oneness with Lord Shiva.


For Happiness and Prosperity – Perform Bilva Pooja with flowers and incense
For Supreme Knowledge – Light deepa (lamp) before Bilva tree
For Freedom from Vice – Remove new leaves from one of the branches of Bilva tree and worship the tree with them
For Growth of Virtue – Feed a Shiva devotee under the Bilva

Medicinal Properties of Bilva Tree

Ayurveda (science of health) values the Bilva highly for the medicinal properties contained in its root, fruit and leaves. These are used in various Ayurvedic preparations.

Root – A preparation made from the root with ginger and toasted rice cures vomiting. For the treatment of piles, dysentery and diarrhoea, a preparation is made from the root mixed with another tuberous root. The oil extracted from the Bilva root, boiled with the juice of Bilva leaves and applied to the head is excellent for nasal catarrh and diseases of the ear.

Fruit – Its pale tawny flesh is sweet and astringent, containing tannin, which acts as an astringent to the bowels. It has a pleasant, agreeable and aromatic flavor, and provides an excellent dietary supplement. The pulp of the dried Bilva fruit, powdered and mixed with arrowroot, is called ‘dietetic Bel’. It is both a sustaining food and a curative medicine.

Leaves – The consumption of Bilva leaves alleviates diseases caused by excess vata and kapha (mucus). They are also useful in diabetes mellitus. For this, a few leaves should be chewed daily and their fresh juice drunk. They are diaphoretic (producing more perspiration), thus reducing temperature and lowering fevers, and an aphrodisiac. A decoction of leaves is a favorite remedy for ailments that often occur during seasonal changes, such as fever, flu and fatigue.

Plant a Bilva Tree this Maha Shivaratri

May the next tree you plant be a Bilva Tree! It will not only show your commitment towards greening the environment, but also display your concern for humanity, given such divine merits and medicinal value of the Bilva Tree.

A bilva sapling must be tenderly nurtured and protected until it has reached a certain height right for transplanting. Quite like a fragile baby bird that must be carefully tended until such time it leaves the nest to flourish independently.

AstroVed will arrange to have your sponsored sapling cared for at Tripura Foundation’s charity project ‘HoPE Town’ in the agricultural vocational until until such time in it’s development where it will be donated to a Shiva Temple. It’s leaves will then be used in temple rituals and festivals.

Your sponsorship of a sapling will benefit those who are served in the charity program by giving work, benefit the temple by providing not only the leaves but for the energy that the tree will bring to the surroundings as a place in itself for worship and the mature tree will provide a source of traditional herbal medicine. You’ll be benefited by having the grace of Lord Shiva showered upon you for this act.

Listen to Chant

http://ishare. rediff.com/music/Devotional/Bilvashtakam/51523


Offering One Bilva Leaf = Dissolution of sins done in 3 births
Offering One Bilva Leaf = Merits from performance of auspicious Soma Yagna
Offering One Bilva Leaf = Merits from conducting 1 crore weddings

If such is the value of one Bilva leaf, you can imagine the unsurpassable worth of the Bilva tree itself. It is said that merely seeing and touching a Bilva tree frees one from sins.

madangopal: Beltalāy - under the Bilva tree......


This is a picture of the Bael or Bilva-tree under which Sādhu Bābā delivered his powerful sermons in his ashram in Prāchīn Māyāpur, Navadwip, and with whose leaves and flowers he cured his followers' ailments. Lord Shiva lives under a Bilva- or Bael tree too.

The following description of Bilva is from yogamag.net:

Bilva – Lord Shiva’s Tree

Swami Vibhooti Saraswati

lakṣmyāś ca stana utpannam 

mahādeva sadā priyam,

bilva vṛkṣam prayacchāmi 

eka bilvaṁ śivārpanam

darśanaṁ bilva vṛkṣasya

sparśanaṁ pāpa-nāśanam

aghora pāpa saṁhāram 

eka bilvaṁ śivārpanam.

"Born from the breasts of Goddess Lakshmi, the Bilva tree is ever dear to Mahadeva. So I ask this tree to offer a Bilva leaf to Lord Shiva. To have darshan of the Bilva tree, and to touch it, frees one from sin. The most terrible karma is destroyed when a Bilva leaf is offered to Lord Shiva." - Śrī Bilvāṣṭakam (v. 6–7)

Indians believe that the knowledge of medicinal plants is older than history itself, that it was gifted hundreds of thousands of years ago to the original inhabitants by Brahma, the divine creator himself. Thus when the sages of the Ayurveda sought to heal human suffering, they were able to draw on knowledge that had already been evolving for millennia in the forests of India. One tree about which they had a very deep knowledge was the Bilva tree. The science of Ayurveda values the Bilva highly for the medicinal properties contained in its root, fruit and leaves. According to Swami Sivananda, it is a healing tree which cures all diseases caused by vata (wind) and gives strength to the body.

About the Bilva tree

The Bilva tree grows in almost all parts of India, irrespective of the nature of the soil, and is bitter, astringent and dry by nature. Tall and austere, with a stern aspect, gnarled trunk and sharp thorns, the Bilva is undoubtedly Lord Shiva’s tree. Shiva is always worshipped with its leaves, and it is said that this tree is much loved by him. It is to be found in all Shiva temples throughout India. The Bilva is also found in Devi temples, where it is worshipped. At midnight, on the evening before Durga and Kali pooja (worship), a tantric ritual called Bel Varan is performed with the appropriate mantras. A particular energy is taken from the tree and placed in a kalash (pot). This energy is then transferred to the statue of Durga or Kali to charge or empower it for the coming pooja. The process is called prana pratishtha, the establishing of the life force in the statue. When the pooja is over, the energy is released, a process called visarjan. The English name for Bilva is Bael, also called ‘stone apple’ as its rather large fruit is like pale yellow suns when ripe. The Hindi appellation is Bel or Bael Sripal. In Sanskrit it is also called Bilva or Sriphal. The botanical name for this tree is Aegle Marmelops, and it belongs to the Rutaceae family. In the Atharva Veda it is described as being so sacred that its wood may not be burned for fuel. It is still worshipped today as a totemic deity by the Santhal tribes in India.

Medicinal properties

The fruit has a hard wood-like rind, which is pale green when unripe, turning pale yellow to brown as it ripens. Its pale tawny flesh is sweet and astringent, containing tannin, which acts as an astringent to the bowels. It has a pleasant, agreeable and aromatic flavour, and provides an excellent dietary supplement. This fruit contains gums, vegetable acid and a very small quantity of sugar. It also contains white seeds and a tenacious transparent gel. The pulp of the dried Bilva fruit, powdered and mixed with arrowroot, is called ‘dietetic Bel’. It is both a sustaining food and a curative medicine, and is traditionally called by Indians ‘the fruit of plenty’. Puranic legend calls it ‘the breasts of the goddess of plenty’. The unripe fruit is roasted with a covering of mud, and the softened pulp mixed with water and sugar or buttermilk. It is more medicinal than the ripe fruit, particularly if dried in the sun. According to Swami Sivananda, “This is highly beneficial in sub-acute and chronic dysentery or diarrhoea, and is particularly useful in irregularity of bowels in children, because it acts as a mild stimulant to the intestinal mucus membrane and therefore stops diarrhoea, acting as a laxative when there is constipation. The unripe fruit cures excess vata and kapha, indigestion, stomach ache and dyspepsia.” A confection is made out of the pulp with amrita and honey, which stops vomiting. The half-ripe fruit is astringent, digestive and anti-diarrhoeal; it binds the bowels. The ripe fruit acts as a laxative, and is aromatic and cooling. The juice is an appetiser and blood purifier.

The leaves.

The dark trifoliate leaves symbolize the three eyes of Lord Shiva, and contain a small percentage of Shiva’s alchemical substance – mercury. These leaves have a very pleasant aroma, are used in the worship of both Shiva and Devi, and form an essential ingredient in tantric rituals. It is said that offerings of water sprinkled on these leaves at any shrine will always remain fresh. Sri Bilvāṣṭakam (v. 5) states, ‘

dāntī koṭi sahasrāni 

aśvamedhaṣṭāni ca

koṭi kanyā mahā-dānam 

eka bilvaṁ śivārpanam’

“Donating a thousand elephants, and horses, and giving daan (offering) of crores of kanyas (virgin girls) is equivalent to offering one Bilva leaf to Lord Shiva.”

The consumption of Bilva leaves alleviates diseases caused by excess vata and kapha (mucus). They are also useful in diabetes mellitus. For this a few leaves should be chewed daily and their fresh juice drunk. They are diaphoretic (producing more perspiration), thus reducing temperature and lowering fevers, and an aphrodisiac. A decoction of leaves is a favourite remedy for ailments that often occur during seasonal changes, such as fever, flu and fatigue. There are sadhus who sustain themselves on Bilva leaves alone. According to Swami Sivananda, “The fresh juice of the leaves is given with the addition of black pepper in cases of jaundice, and when diluted with water or honey, this is highly praised remedy in catarrh and feverishness.” The root is the most important part of the tree medicinally, after removing the outer skin. A preparation made from the root with ginger and toasted rice cures vomiting. For the treatment of piles, dysentery and diarrhoea, a preparation is made from the root mixed with the tuberous root of Padha. The oil extracted from the Bilva root, boiled with the juice of Bilva leaves and applied to the head is excellent for nasal catarrh and diseases of the ear. The confection Vilvadi Lehiam is also made from this root. The flowers cure diarrhoea, vomiting and thirst, while the gum of the inside pulp of the fruit is an aphrodisiac (kama-vardhani).

The Bilva tree in the Shiva Purana

According to the Shiva Purana the Bilva tree is the manifest form of Lord Shiva himself, while all the great tirthas (pilgrimage places) are said to reside at its base. One who worships the shivalingam while sitting under the Bilva, claims this great epic, attains the state of Shiva. Washing the head by this tree is said to be the equivalent of bathing in all the sacred rivers. One who performs Bilva pooja with flowers and incense achieves Shiva loka, the abode of pure consciousness, and has happiness and prosperity bestowed upon them. The lighting of the deepak (lamp) before this tree bestows knowledge and enables the devotee to merge in Lord Shiva. The Shiva Purana also claims that if the devotee removes the new leaves from one of the branches of that tree and worships the tree with them, they will be freed from vice, while one who feeds a devotee under the Bilva will grow in virtue.

The hunter and the Bilva tree

The Shiva Purana also relates the following story or myth. Once there was a cruel-hearted hunter by the name of Gurudruh who lived in the lonely forest. On the auspicious day of Maha Shivaratri he had to go out hunting because his family had nothing to eat. Maha Shivaratri (the great night of Shiva) is the most sacred time for fasts, prayers and offerings, when even the most involuntary acts, if pleasing to Lord Shiva, are made holy. By sunset Gurudruh had not been successful in the hunt. Coming to a lake, he climbed a tree and waited for some unsuspecting animal to come and drink. He did not notice that the tree he had climbed was the Bilva tree. Neither did he notice the shivalingam beneath it, nor the water pot hanging in the branch just above it. After some time a gentle deer came to quench her thirst, and Gurudruh prepared to shoot. As he drew his bow, he accidentally knocked the water pot hanging in the tree and some water fell down on the shivalingam beneath, along with a few Bilva leaves. Thus, unknowingly and unwittingly, Gurudruh had worshipped Shiva in the first quarter of the night. As a result his heart was a little purified by this act performed on such an auspicious night. Meanwhile the deer, startled by the movement in the tree, looked up and saw the hunter about to release his arrow. “Please do not kill me just yet,” pleaded the deer. “I must first take care of my children, and then I will return to be food for your family.” The hunter, whose heart had been softened a little by the accidental worship, on noticing the beauty of the deer, let her go on condition that she would return on the morrow to give her body as food for his family. Later that same night, the sister of the deer came looking for her. Once more the hunter took aim and once more, without his being aware, the water and the Bilva leaves fell down upon the shivalingam. Again, unknowingly, the hunter had worshipped Shiva in the second quarter of the night. The effect of this was that Gurudruh’s heart was further purified. His pranas softened a little more, and he allowed this animal to also go and tend to its young, provided it returned the next day to provide him and his family with food. In the third quarter of the night, the mate of the first deer came in search of her, and again the strange worship took place as the hunter took aim for the third time. But the hunter’s heart was beginning to melt due to the worship, and he let the deer’s mate go also for the same reason and under the same conditions. Later when the three deer met together, they discussed who should go and offer themselves for the hunter’s food. Even the children offered to give their lives. Finally the whole family decided to surrender to the hunter together, for none of them could bear to live without the others. Thus they set off towards the lake with heavy hearts. When they arrived at the Bilva tree, Gurudruh was very pleased and relieved to see them, and he immediately prepared for the kill. He took aim for the fourth time, but in the same accidental manner as before, worship in the fourth quarter of the night took place unknown to him. This final action of Gurudruh brought about a complete change of heart and, as he was about to release the first arrow, his heart overflowed with pity for the innocent deer. Tears filled his eyes at the thought of all the animals he had killed in the past, and slowly he lowered his bow. Greatly moved by the selfless action of these animals, he felt ashamed and allowed the whole family of deer to leave unharmed. Such is the purity and spiritual power of the Bilva tree that, even without his knowledge or conscious effort, the cruel-hearted hunter had been transformed into a man of compassion and understanding, and was delivered from his past bad karma by the grace of Shiva and the Bilva tree."

I do believe western Vaiṣṇavas must study these things and not reject them as 'demigod worship' since we don't really know anything yet about Hinduism, not even after 30 or 40 years of practise. It will not compromise the exclusivity of our Radha-Kṛṣṇa worship at all. It needs to be known in general, and in particular for Radha-Kṛṣṇa worship also, because so many stories about different gods are mentioned in Gaudiya Vaiṣṇava literature that we often don't know anything about due to our lack of Vedic/Hindu upbringing.

Om Sai Ram!: Sacred Plants of India Bilva

Bilva, bael, marble apple tree, Hungarian quince, aegle marmelos (lat), wood apple, stone apple, Bengal quince (eng), bel, sriphal (ind).
Bilva is a small thorny tree, a kind of wild apple tree. Homeland - India. It grows throughout South and Southeast Asia - in dry forests and in the valleys of India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Burma, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Pakistan, as well as Java, the Philippines, Fiji and the Malay Peninsula.

Leaves are dark green, three-toothed. The bark is soft and peeling. Some branches have thorns. The fruits are oval, large, comparable in size to a pomelo or grapefruit. They are covered with a smooth and very strong green or gray shell, which can be broken with a hammer or a large knife, or with a stone. The yellow flesh is very aromatic.

The fruits are eaten raw and dry. The fruit juice is used to make a drink similar to lemonade. In India, the pulp and juice of the bilva fruit is the basis for the popular refreshing drink sharbat/sharbat, which contains water, sugar, lime juice and ice. Bilva leaves and shoots are used to make salads.

Bilva is a sacred tree. Shamrock-shaped bilva leaves are used in worship of Shiva and Shakti. The offering of bilva leaves to Shiva provides the worshiper with three vargas: righteousness, wealth and well-being, as well as enjoyment of the joys of life. The bilva fruit symbolizes Lakshmi, the Goddess of wealth and happiness.

In India, this small thorny tree is considered sacred. Bilva root balances Vata, the juice from the leaves helps to cope with diabetes, and also relieves fever and chills. The fruit, one of the few used unripe in Ayurveda, is hot, oily, potent, stimulates digestion and balances Vata and Pitta. Bilva oil ear drops are used to treat deafness.
Bael (Bilva) is one of the three most important fruits for Ayurveda and Tibetan medicine.
All parts of Ayurveda are used.

Bilva is part of the well-known composition of chyawanprash.

The spiritual meaning of this tree is even more important.

Shiva Purana reads:

53-54. Divine rites should always be performed facing the north at night. In general, the worship of Shiva should always be done with the face facing north, not east. (But) Shakti-samhita should not be read with the face facing north or west, as that is the reverse (side).

55-56. Shiva should not be worshiped without tripundra, rudraksha and bilva leaves. O best among the Rishis!
Chapter 22. (Conclusion on the acceptance (use) of Naivedya Shiva by others and on the greatness (glory) of Bilva)

The Rishis said:

should be accepted by others (outsiders). Please tell us your final opinion on this matter and the greatness of Bilva."

Suta said:

2. "O rishis, listen very carefully to what I say. I will gladly explain everything. All of you who have taken upon yourself the observance of the sacred rites of Shiva are indeed blessed.

3. A devotee of Shiva is pure (in body and soul) - one who faithfully conducts (performs) good rites and with a concentrated (steady) decision (determination) should accept the Naivedya of Shiva. He should give up all thoughts that are not suitable (not worthy) to occupy (the mind in vain).

Now - listen me attentively - I will explain the greatness of Bilva.0004

22. Bilva is the symbol of Shiva. Even the gods revere her. It is difficult to comprehend its greatness. This can only be understood to some extent.

23. Whatever sacred center exists in the world, it is under the roots of Bilva.

24. The worshiper of Mahadeva in the form of Lingam at the roots of Bilva becomes a purified soul. Surely he will reach Shiva.

25. He who pours water on his head near the roots of the Bilva must be considered as having bathed in all the holy waters of the Earth. Indeed, he is a saint.

26. Seeing a groove full of water near the roots of the bilva, Shiva becomes very pleased.

27. A person who honors the root (trunk) of bilva with incense and flowers reaches the world of Shiva. His happiness increases and his family prospers.

28. He who arranges the lit lamps in a row near the roots (trunk) of the bilva, with reverence, becomes the owner of the knowledge of the truth and plunges into Shiva.

29. He who honors the bilva tree, which abounds in numerous fresh shoots, becomes free from sins.

30. If a person gives a gift to a devotee of Shiva near the trunk of a bilva, he gets the fruit (of good merit) 10 million times greater than the gift donated in the usual way.

31. Who feeds a devotee of Shiva with rice boiled in milk near the trunk of a bilva will never be poor.

So in the sacred "Shiva Mahapurana", in the section "Vidyeshvara Samhita" ("Section of the Lord of Knowledge") ends the 22nd chapter, dedicated to the description of Shiva's Naivedya and the greatness of Bilva.

Skanda Purana speaks of bilva.

I used to listen to (discuss) the Dharma in the assembly of sadhus. Hearing (about the ways of worship), I began to worship Lord Shiva with whole bilva leaves./26/ Neither jasmine, nor madara, nor lotus, nor mallika, is so loved by the Enemy of Madana as sri vriksha (bilva)./27/

bilvAshhTakam Bilvashtaka

tridalaM triguNAkAraM trinetraM cha triyAyudham. h .
trijanmapApasaMhAraM ekabilvaM shivArpaNam.h .. 1..

The image of the three gunas, consisting of three leaves, three-eyed, three-armed, eliminating the sin of three births - One (leaf) of Bilva, offered to Shiva.|1|

trishAkhaiH bilvapatraishcha hyachchhidraiH komalaiH shubhaiH .
shivapUjAM karishhyAmi hyekabilvaM shivArpaNam.h .. 2..

With three branches with whole bilva leaves and beautiful lotuses, I worship Shiva, (who has everything) one (leaf) of Bilva offered to Shiva.|2|

akhaNDa bilva patreNa pUjite nandikeshvare .
shuddhyanti sarvapApebhyo hyekabilvaM shivArpaNam.h .. 3..

An infinite number of bilva leaves when worshiping Nandikeshvara cleanse from all sins (all this) - one (leaf) of bilva offered to Shiva.|3|

shAligrAma shilAmekAM viprANAM jAtu chArpayet.h .
somayaGYa mahApuNyaM ekabilvaM shivArpaNam.h .. 4..

Out of (many) brahmins, perhaps one can read Shaligrama sila. Great merit from the sacrifice of soma - one (leaf) of Bilva offered to Shiva. |4|

dantikoTi sahasrANi vAjapeya shatAni cha .
koTikanyA mahAdAnaM ekabilvaM shivArpaNam.h .. 5..

The great gift of offering a million elephants, hundreds of sacrifices of soma (vajapeya) and millions of daughters - (there is) one (leaf) of Bilva offered to Shiva.|5| 9ishhTvA hyekabilvaM shivArpaNam.h ..
mUlato brahmarUpAya madhyato vishhNurUpiNe .
agrataH shivarUpAya hyekabilvaM shivArpaNam.h .. 8..

Vision of Kala Bhairava Dwelling in Kashi and Madhava (Vishnu) in Prayaga (grants) one (leaf) of bilva offered to Shiva.
At the base in the form of Brahma, in the middle in the form of Vishnu, at the top in the form of Shiva (revered) one (leaf) of Bilva offered to Shiva.|8|

bilvAshhTakamidaM puNyaM yaH paThet.h shivasannidhau .
sarvapApa vinirmuktaH shivalokamavApnuyAt.h ..

One who reads this good octaht, (dedicated) to Bilva in the presence of Shiva, he, free from all sins, will reach the World of Shiva.



Bilva, bael or Aegle Marmelos - the sacred tree of Shiva / Blog them.

OmNamaha / Vaikuntha Ru

The Skanda Purana speaks of bilva.

I used to hear (discuss) the Dharma in a sadhus' assembly. Hearing (about the ways of worship), I began to worship Lord Shiva with whole bilva leaves. / 26 / Neither jasmine, nor madara, nor lotus, nor mallika, is not loved so much by the Enemy of Madana as sri vriksha (bilva). / 27/

Bilva is part of the well-known composition of chyawanprash, an Ayurvedic drug of life.
Bilva is a sacred tree (“marble apple tree”). Shamrock-shaped bilva leaves are used in worship of Shiva and Shakti. The offering of leaves to Shiva < bilva > provides the worshiper with three vargas (see): righteousness, wealth and prosperity, as well as enjoyment of the joys of life. The bilva fruit symbolizes Lakshmi, the Goddess of wealth and happiness;

All parts of Ayurveda are used.

used part: Fruit, root, leaves, leaves juice

Systems: digestive

Acts: Antiviral, adhesive, binding, windbreaker

Indications: diarrhea, glides, context : mature fruits are difficult to digest and can upset the doshas.

In India, this small thorny tree is considered sacred. Bilva root balances Vata, the juice from the leaves helps to cope with diabetes, and also relieves fever and chills. The fruit, one of the few used unripe in Ayurveda, is hot, oily, potent, stimulates digestion and balances Vata and Pitta. Bilva oil ear drops are used to treat deafness.
Bael (Bilva) is one of the three most important fruits for Ayurveda and Tibetan medicine.

The spiritual meaning of this tree is even more important.

Shiva Purana says:

53-54. Divine rites should always be performed facing the north at night. In general, the worship of Shiva should always be done with the face facing north, not east. (But) Shakti-samhita should not be read with the face facing north or west, as that is the reverse (side).

55-56. Shiva should not be worshiped without tripundra, rudraksha and bilva leaves. O best among the Rishis!

Chapter 22. (Conclusion on the acceptance (use) of Naivedya Shiva by others and on the greatness (glory) of Bilva)

The Rishis said:

should not be accepted by others (outsiders). Please tell us your final opinion on this matter and the greatness of Bilva."

Suta said:

2. “O rishis, listen to what I say very carefully. I'll be happy to explain everything. All of you who have taken upon yourself the observance of the sacred rites of Shiva are truly blessed.

3. A devotee of Shiva - pure (both in soul and body) - who faithfully performs (performs) good rites and with a concentrated (steady) decision (determination) must accept Shiva's naivedya. He must leave all thoughts that do not correspond (are not worthy) to occupy (the mind in vain).

Now - listen to me carefully - I will explain the greatness of Bilva.

22. Bilva is the symbol of Shiva. Even the gods revere her. It is difficult to comprehend its greatness. This can only be understood to some extent.

23. Whatever sacred center exists in the world, it is under the roots of Bilva.

24. The worshiper of Mahadeva in the form of Lingam at the roots of Bilva becomes a purified soul. Surely he will reach Shiva.

25. He who pours water on his head near the roots of the Bilva must be considered as having bathed in all the holy waters of the Earth. Indeed, he is a saint.

26. Seeing a groove full of water near the roots of the bilva, Shiva becomes very pleased.

27. A person who honors the root (trunk) of bilva with incense and flowers reaches the world of Shiva. His happiness increases and his family prospers.

28. He who arranges the lit lamps in a row near the roots (trunk) of the bilva, with reverence, becomes the owner of the knowledge of the truth and plunges into Shiva.

29. He who honors the bilva tree, which abounds in numerous fresh shoots, becomes free from sins.

30. If a person gives a gift to a devotee of Shiva near the trunk of a bilva, he gets the fruit (of good merit) 10 million times greater than the gift donated in the usual way.

31. Who feeds a devotee of Shiva with rice boiled in milk near the trunk of a bilva will never be poor.

So in the sacred "Shiva Mahapurana", in the section "Vidyeshvara Samhita" ("Section of the Lord of Knowledge") ends the 22nd chapter, dedicated to the description of Shiva's Naivedya and the greatness of Bilva.

bilvAshhTakam Bilvashtak

tridalaM triguNAkAraM trinetraM cha triyAyudham.h.

trijanmapApasaMhAraM ekabilvaM shivArpaNam.h… 1…

The image of the three gunas, consisting of three leaves, three-eyed, three-armed, eliminating the sin of three births — One (leaf) of Bilva, offered to Shiva.|1|

trishAkhaiH bilvapatraishcha hyachchhidraiH komalaiH shubhaiH.

shivapUjAM karishhyAmi hyekabilvaM shivArpaNam.h… 2…

With three branches with whole bilva leaves and beautiful lotuses, I worship Shiva, (who is everything) one (leaf) of Bilva offered to Shiva.|2|

akhaNDa bilva patreNa pUjite nandikeshvare.

shuddhyanti sarvapApebhyo hyekabilvaM shivArpaNam.h… 3…

An infinite number of bilva leaves when worshiping Nandikeshvara purify from all sins (all this) — one (leaf) of bilva offered to Shiva. |3|

shAligrAma shilAmekAM viprANAM jAtu chArpayet.h.

somayaGYa mahApuNyaM ekabilvaM shivArpaNam.h… 4…

Out of (many) brahmins, perhaps one can read the Shaligrama sila. Great merit from the sacrifice of Soma is one (leaf) of Bilva offered to Shiva.|4| 9ishhTvA hyekabilvaM shivArpaNam.h…

mUlato brahmarUpAya madhyato vishhNurUpiNe.

agrataH shivarUpAya hyekabilvaM shivArpaNam.h… 8…

Vision of Kala Bhairava Dwelling in Kashi and Madhava (Vishnu) in Prayaga (grants) one (leaf) of bilva offered to Shiva.

At the base in the form of Brahma, in the middle in the form of Vishnu, at the top in the form of Shiva (revered) one (leaf) of Bilva offered to Shiva.|8|

bilvAshhTakamidaM puNyaM yaH paThet.h shivasannidhau.

sarvapApa vinirmuktaH shivalokamavApnuyAt.h…

Translated by Erchenkov O. N.

Whoever reads this good octave, (dedicated) to Bilva in the presence of Shiva, he, free from all sins, will reach the World of Shiva.


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